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Author Topic: Roydon Hall, East Peckham  (Read 23585 times)

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Offline JohnWalker

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 12:52:25 »
I seem to recall that this was the headquarters of a religious society for a while - unless i'm thinking of the wrong place.

Offline Islesy

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2012, 09:28:28 »


Three Peaks Challenge 2012 - raising funds for Help for Heroes
www.bmycharity.com/Islesy

Offline kyn

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2012, 19:05:07 »
Thursday 7th August, 1862

The Murder and Roydon-Hall – Yesterday afternoon the prisoners now in custody, charged with night-poaching and the murder of James Gray, a keeper in the employ of Major Cook, Roydon-hall, East Peckham, were brought up on remand before Mr. J. Savage.  There are six persons in custody, while two others implicated in the affair, and whose names for obvious reasons we do not give, are still at large.  The men in the hands of the police are labourers residing at some distance from the estate upon which the affray took place, which was, up to the time of commission of the offence, unknown to them.  They give their names as Joseph Obey, 52; Thomas Stevens, 32; George Alchin, 29; John Clapson, 29; John Hawkes, 25; and Stephen Burgess, 22.  The Chief Constable of Kent (Captain Ruxton) said that the officers had not yet succeeded in apprehending the other men who were concerned, and he should therefore merely offer such evidence as would justify the magistrate in further remanding the prisoners.  For this purpose he should tender the statements made by one of the prisoners.  John Hawkes, having been duly cautioned, made the following statement:-  “I live at Snodland, in this county.  Burgess and another man not in custody came and called me.  I do not remember on what day, and we three walked together to Hamhill, where we called up Stevens and Clapson.  We went to Larkfield and called out another man (not in custody), and we then went on to East Malling, where we were joined by two of three others whose names I do not know.  After leaving the Ship at East Malling we travelled on further.  I did not know where we were.  I was quite lost.  We came to the wood where the birds were and shot several times – I don’t know how many, and we were leaving the wood, when a man, whom I do not know, came round before us and ordered us to stop.  We asked him to let us go on our journey, and he said he had been waiting for us a long time, and would meet us presently.  The man came round before us, and at last struck at one of our men with a flail, and, after a little bit of a tussle, the man he struck at (Alfred Burr) fired the gun.  The man that was shot fell right upon him and collared him, and they went down together, and there was a good deal more tusselling afterwards.  I and three others then went right away, and I saw no more.  The whole of the prisoners were there.  Our leaders were Burr and one of the others not yet taken.  I do not know how long ago it was.”  The prisoners asked no questions, and they were further remanded.

Offline kyn

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2012, 20:18:25 »
I prefer to see members getting involved than just keep replying to myself :)

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2012, 17:31:30 »
Hope I didn't jump the gun then Kyn, sorry if I did.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline kyn

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2012, 16:57:03 »
I have grabbed all the newspaper reports so will be posting the details up later  :)

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2012, 16:53:17 »
It looks as though the trial of these men took place on Nov 29th 1862 at Maidstone Assizes.
Joseph Obey, Thomas Stevens and Thomas Allchin  received 4 months each for Night Poaching. Stephen Burgess received 12 mths for Night Poaching . John Hawkes was charged with Manslaughter and Night Poaching but his trial was postponed with admitted evidence. Yet to find out about that one, will carry on looking for it.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline kyn

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2012, 14:43:01 »
Saturday 2nd August, 1862

The Roydon-Hall Murder – It has already been stated that five men were apprehended a few days ago by Mr. Hulse, the superintendent of the Kent Constabulary, stationed at West Malling, upon the charge of being concerned in the brutal murder, committed on the 21st of January last, of James Gray, a gamekeeper, in the service of Major Cook, of Roydon-hall, east Peckham.  Since then another man had been apprehended, and it is believed that the whole of the party concerned in the outrage, with the exception of one man, are in the hands of the police.  A preliminary inquiry took place yesterday, at the magistrate’s chief office, West Malling, before Mr. J. Savage, one of the county magistrates.  The names of the prisoners are Thomas Stevens, John Hawkes, John Hodge, alias “Happy Jack,” Joseph Obey, Thomas Allchin, and Stephen Burgess.  They are mostly young men, and are strangers to East Peckham, where the murder was committed, but reside in different villages within a distance of five or six miles, and they are all known to the police as notorious, poachers.  Ever since the murder took place they have been suspected, but it appears that it is only recently that information has been obtained such as would justify their apprehension.  Captain Ruxton, the chief constable of the Kent constabulary, was present to assist in the inquiry, which, as may be expected, created a great deal of interest.  The facts connected with the murder were briefly stated.  It appeared that the deceased, who was about 40 years old, and a fine courageous man, had been keeper to Major Cook for about three years, and there appeared to be no doubt that the poachers in the neighbourhood – of which class, unhappily, there is a considerable number – entertained a great deal of ill-feeling towards him, on account of the strictness with which he performed his duties.  On the morning on which he lost his life he had gone to bed, but one of his assistants, hearing guns fired at 1 o’clock in the morning in a wood called Moat Wood, went to his cottage and informed him of the fact.  He got up, and immediately proceeded to the spot where the firing was heard, and on their way they met some labouring men, who accompanied them, the party being composed of six persons.  They had not gone far before they came upon a number of men, all of whom were armed with guns, and the moment the latter observed the keepers they formed a line and presented their guns.  The deceased called out that they would not surely be so cowardly as to shoot, and one of the men, with an oath, declared that they would do so if they attempted to take them.  Gray, who was a very determined man, immediately told his party to advance and seize the poachers.  The instant he did so one of the men discharged a gun at him, and the whole of the charge entered the thick part of his thigh.  A desperate struggle then took place between the keepers and the poachers, but in the result the whole of the latter, who were eight in number, succeeded in getting away.  The unfortunate keeper was removed to his own cottage, where he died at half-past 5 o’clock the same morning from loss of blood and the shock to the system.  A great number of persons were subsequently apprehended and charged with being concerned in the murder, bit two only were eventually committed for trial.  The only additional evidence gone into was that of Mr. Hulse, the superintendent of police, who stated that he went to Allchin’s cottage, accompanied by some of his constables, and the moment Allchin saw him he said that he had expected him for some time, and that he intended to have gone to him himself if the officers had not come.  The other prisoners were subsequently apprehended, and when they found themselves in custody they all appeared anxious to give information in reference to the crime.  Burgess, however, declared that he knew nothing of the charge, and he said that “Tom Stevens,” who was one of the men in custody, could clear him.  Upon this Stevens was brought forward, and when Burgess saw him he lost all his confidence, and he admitted that he was at the affray, but denied, as did all the other prisoners, that he was the man actually fired the gun.  The prisoners were asked by the magistrate whether any of them desired to say anything in answer to the charge, and they all replied in the negative.  They were then remanded to the county gaol at Maidstone.  There is reason to believe, form inquiries that have been made, that Allchin really intended to have given information to the police, but it has also been ascertained that he had sent round to all the other prisoners advising them to get out of the way, and he, no doubt, expected they would have been able to make their escape.

Offline kyn

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Re: Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2012, 11:24:46 »
Saturday, 25th January, 1862

Murder by Poachers – For some time past great depredations have been committed by gangs of poachers in the woods surrounding Roydon-hall, East Peckham, the seat of Mr. Cook, and that gentleman has been compelled to employ extra watchers to look after his extensive game preserves.  On Wednesday morning these watchers discovered a gang of eight or nine poachers, in pursuit of game, when an encounter took place, in which the head keeper in the employ of Major Cook, son of the proprietor, lost his life.  Grey, who was a powerful and determined man, exclaimed, “I know you all, you are east Malling men,” and rushed in among them.  The poachers had a desperate struggle, in the course of which two of the latter were knocked down.  They called to their brother poachers for assistance, one of them exclaiming, “Shoot the ------!” and a gun was discharged, the contents of which entered the right thigh of Grey, who notwithstanding fought on, knocking down two more of the poachers with his life-preserver.  At length he failed through loss of blood, when the other keepers conveyed him to his cottage, where he was promptly attended by Mr. Biggenden, of east Peckham.  He lingered in great agony until nearly 6 o’clock, when he expired.  In the meantime the poachers retreated in something like military order, presenting their guns at the keepers and threatening to “floor them as they had done the other man.”  It is evident that some of the gang were severely injured, as marks of blood were traced.  None of the poachers have yet been arrested.

Offline kyn

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Roydon Hall, East Peckham
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2012, 11:13:08 »
Information on the residents of this estate can also be found here:  http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=14458.0

Tuesday 10th June, 1834

Kent – The Roydon Hall Estate, within 8 miles of Maidstone, 6 of Tunbridge, and 33 of London, with the Park and Demesne Lands, Manors, Grant of Free Warren, Rights, Royalties, &c. – By Messrs. Morris, at the ?????, London, on Wednesday, July 5, at 12. in 1 lot, by order of the Devises for Sale of the late Sir William Jarvis Twysden, Bart.

The ancient Mansion called Roydon Hall, for more than three centuries the property and residence of the Twysden family, and last occupied by Sir W. J. Twysden, Bart., deceased, with the gardens, shrubberies, &c., adjoining, consisting about 5 acres, and the contiguous park, commanding from several points extensive and picturesque views over the most fertile and highly cultivated portion of Kent.  The estate is freehold, and comprises in the whole, by a recent admeasurement, 6½ acres of hops, arable, meadow, pasture, and wood, in the several parishes of East Peckham, Wateringbury , and Nettlested; part of the land, including about 178 acres of highly valuable wood land, is in hand; the remainder ? let to most respectable tenants, and the annual rent of value, upon a reasonable estimate, exceeds £1,500.  Also the Freehold Manors of Chart, Eastmore, Albans, Westburyes, and Lornewood, with the heriots, quit rents, and other services incident to them, together with the rights of free warren granted to Sir William Twysden, Knight and Baronet, in the 15th year of the reign of James the First.  It would be superfluous to enlarge upon the value and advantages of this estate either as a residence or for investment.  The whole is in a high state of cultivation.  The hop grounds, in Wateringbury particularly, possess a distinguishing feature, that in?lighting years they have generally been found to escape the attack in other grounds, thus rendering the produce doubly valuable.  The property is in the most fertile part of the highly favoured county of Kent, surrounded by good roads, at an easy distance from the county town, the fashionable resort of Tunbridge-wells, and the metropolis.  It may be viewed by application at Roydon Hall, where more detailed particulars and lithographed plans of the estate may be had 1 ½ days prior to the sale; also the Rose and crown, Tunbridge; Crown, Rochester; Fountain, Canterbury; of John Sheringham, Esq., Raymond-buildings, Grays-inn; of John Dudlow, Esq., Town Malling; at the Auction <art; (the rest is unreadable).

 

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