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Author Topic: Scotney Castle  (Read 4794 times)

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Offline Lutonman

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Re: Scotney Castle
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2017, 18:56:02 »
Kyn,
It's a great place to go, we've been many times.

Offline kyn

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Re: Scotney Castle
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2017, 00:16:18 »
We had a little visit here today :)

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Scotney Castle
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2012, 17:02:40 »
There are some lovely old (18th Century ish)  bottles above the fireplace in the second picture. I do love the iridescence on these early bottles, the onion shaped bottle to the left is earlier. Looks a super place for a visit.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Scotney Castle
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2012, 14:59:35 »
Thanks cliveh, great write up and pics of this lovely castle. The 'new' castle wasn't open to the public last time we visited , but the white Wisteria was in bloom over the old castle and looked stunning. We shall have to visit again  :)

Thanks Lyn L.  :)

It's well worth you going again. Meanwhile here's some photos of the inside of the 'New' castle to whet your appetite:
















cliveh

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Scotney Castle
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2012, 14:25:18 »
Thanks cliveh, great write up and pics of this lovely castle. The 'new' castle wasn't open to the public last time we visited , but the white Wisteria was in bloom over the old castle and looked stunning. We shall have to visit again  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline cliveh

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Scotney Castle
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2012, 09:37:17 »

Scotney Castle, near Lamberhurst on the Kent / Sussex border, is actually two castles. The ‘Old’ castle was built about 1378-80 by Roger Ashburnham, the nephew of the M.P. Sir John Ashburnham, as a response to the threat of a French invasion. It was built, more as a fortified manor house than a fortress, with towers in each corner.

By 1580 the estate was in the hands of a prominent Catholic family, the Darells, who re-built the south wing adjoining the, by now, one remaining tower. Between 1591 and 1598 Catholicism was illegal in England and in 1598 Thomas Darrell hid the Jesuit Father, Richard Blount in a priest’s hole in the castle. During a raid on the castle by the authorities the Father fled, escaping across the moat.

In the 1630’s William Darell demolished much of the castle, using the masonry to build a new, three-storey east range. In the 1720’s George Darell made further alterations capping the now named Ashburnham Tower with a cupola and conical tiled roof. By the mid 18th century family discord and lawsuits forced the Darells to place Scotney up for sale.

In 1778 the castle was bought by Edward Hussey, a barrister who later played regular cricket for the M.C.C. Following Edward’s suicide at the castle and the subsequent death of his son and heir barely a year later his remaining family including his grandson, Edward, moved to St. Leonards.

Edward Hussey III moved back to Scotney in 1835 and commenced building a new house there. He chose a young architect, Anthony Salvin, to build this ‘New’ castle. Salvin and Hussey designed it in the revived ‘Elizabethan’ style and construction began in 1837 using sandstone dug from a small quarry in the grounds of the estate.

Edward lived in the new house until he died in 1894 and the estate passed to his eldest son, Edward Windsor Hussey who continued to live there until his death in 1952.

Edward Windsor Hussey’s nephew, Christopher Hussey, inherited the estate after his uncle’s death. He been editor of ‘Country Life’ magazine the 1930’s and was a mjor influence on Lord Lothian, the mastermind of the National Trust Country Houses Scheme which had been formed to preserve and protect Britain’s historic country houses.

Christopher died in 1970 leaving the estate to the National Trust. His widow, Betty, continued to live in the house until her death, aged 99, in 2006.

The ‘New’ castle is now fully open to the public as are the gardens and the remains of the ‘Old’ castle.

















cliveh

 

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