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Author Topic: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)  (Read 5081 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2012, 21:32:59 »
These are great additions, thank you :)

I didn't find anything further in the Times unfortunately.

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2012, 20:07:59 »
This is Rickon's entry from the Post Office Directories for Esses, Herts and Kent, dated 1855. 

Sorry its a bit big, Kyn, I could not seem to crop it properly.


Offline Lutonman

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2012, 19:49:50 »
Dates tie up with this link in the London Gasette for the start up at Waterside lane.

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/23042/pages/5763/page.pdf

The two remaining Gas holders at Gillingham are more recent.

Offline kyn

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2012, 13:35:48 »
That is great, thank you :)

I wonder what else we can find about him, he must have been involved in quite a lot to set this up!

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2012, 13:05:27 »
At around a similar date, John Rickon is listed as being at Rome Lane Foundry, which is perhaps where the gasometers were manufactured.   

DTT

merc

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Re: Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2012, 11:35:58 »
I think it may have been, Kyn. The inquest was held at the Green Dragon.

From an 1866 map:

Offline kyn

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Gas Works Explosion (Chatham/Gillingham)
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2012, 10:55:54 »
Monday 5th December, 1853

Fatal Explosion at Chatham.

On Friday night, about half-past 9 o’clock, the inhabitants of Chatham were thrown into a state of excitement in consequence of a rumour, that a dreadful explosion had occurred at the new gasworks recently erected near the St. Mary’s Barracks for supplying the out-parish of Gillingham with gas, and by which two lives had been sacrificed.

It appears that two brothers, the Messrs. Rickon, have erected, at their own expense, extensive works near the river Medway, for the manufacture of gas on a large scale.  The gasometer had been erected, and everything was so far completed that it was determined to fill the gasometer, preparatory to lighting up the parish on the following (Saturday) night.  A large quantity of gas had been admitted into the gasometer, Mr. Rickon himself superintending the operation, when it was found that the gas was escaping from some part of it, and the engineer (John Ormsby Culyer), and also a workman named William Hall, proceeded to the top of it to see from what part the leakage came, incautiously taking with them a lighted candle.  Mr. Rickon requested Culyer not to venture, but he appears to have disobeyed the order, for, immediately after reaching the top of the gasometer, the gas, coming in contact with the flame of the candle, blew up with a loud report.  Culyer, the engineer, was blown a great distance into the adjacent marshes, and, when discovered, was frightfully mangled, and, of course, quite dead.  The body of Hall has not yet been discovered.  The force of the explosion was so great as to blow out the top of the gasometer and break three of the guide lines.  The other parts of the premises have received little or no damage.

The body of Hall is supposed to be under the gasometer, which has several feet of water in it.  It will be considerable time before the works are in a fit state for the manufacture of gas, owing to this untoward accident.

The inquest on the body of Culyer, the engineer, through whom the accident originated, will be held in Monday before the coroner, Mr. T. Hills.


I have checked my plans but I can't find where these works were.  It says Chatham but the description is Gillingham.  Could this be the first gasometer at the Strand?

 

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