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Author Topic: HMS Namur  (Read 6865 times)

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Brett

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 10:24:20 »
http://youtu.be/MEyNHtrMyEo

I scanned this earlier this year. It is part of a project that is underway, its going to look great when they have finished.

Offline davpott

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2013, 14:25:24 »
Here's a follow up article in Current Archaeology to the link posted by Herb Collector.

http://www.archaeology.co.uk/articles/features/finding-hms-namur.htm

WO1RNR

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2013, 20:26:55 »
fyi
HMS Namur
Built at Chatham Dockyard between 1750 and 1756, HMS Namur saw 47 years of active service in her lifetime, and was engaged in nine fleet actions – seven of which were instrumental in enabling the Royal Navy to secure and maintain worldwide command of the oceans in the second half of the 18th century. One of her more well-known captains was Charles Austen – Jane Austen’s brother – who served as her captain between November 1811 and November 1814 when she was stationed at the Nore Anchorage off Sheerness as flagship of Sir Thomas Williams.

HMS Namur was broken up in 1833 in Chatham and around 25 per cent of her hull timbers and planking were used to make a new floor in the dockyard's Wheelwrights Shop the following year. Rediscovered in 1995, these remains are now part of an £8.5 million project to preserve and interpret the finds.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2012, 16:26:03 »
That much is unclear and more research is going on into this. What is clear is that a number of the older buildings in the Dockyard have frames made from recycled ships timbers. The Sail and Colour loft is one example and it may be that the timbers were stored in there with the intention being to use them in a future building.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Far away

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2012, 07:32:08 »
Were the timbers used to support the floor? I assume that they must have had some heavy machines in that building?

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: HMS Namur
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2012, 15:45:12 »
Short BBC video, includes letter from press ganged teenager on board.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-19302621

Olaudah Equiano, the black writer and anti-slavery activist of Georgian England, served on board the Namur.
'The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African: Written by Himself.'
The latter part of chapter 3 and the first part of chapter 4 detail his time on board the Namur.
Book available free @ http://archive.org/details/theinterestingna15399gut
Extract.
"My station during the engagement was on the middle-deck, where I was quartered with another boy, to bring powder to the aftermost gun; and here I was a witness of the dreadful fate of many of my companions, who, in the twinkling of an eye, were dashed in pieces, and launched into eternity. Happily I escaped unhurt, though the shot and splinters flew thick about me the whole fight. Towards the latter part of it my master was wounded, and I saw him carried down to the surgeon; but though I was much alarmed for him and wished to assist him I dared not leave my post. At this station my gun-mate (a partner in bringing powder for the same gun) and I ran a very great risk for more than half an hour of blowing up the ship. For, when we had taken the cartridges out of the boxes, the bottoms of many of them proving rotten, the powder ran all about the deck, near the match tub: we scarcely had water enough at the last to throw on it. We were also, from our employment, very much exposed to the enemy's shots; for we had to go through nearly the whole length of the ship to bring the powder. I expected therefore every minute to be my last; especially when I saw our men fall so thick about me; but, wishing to guard as much against the dangers as possible, at first I thought it would be safest not to go for the powder till the Frenchmen had fired their broadside; and then, while they were charging, I could go and come with my powder: but immediately afterwards I thought this caution was fruitless; and, cheering myself with the reflection that there was a time allotted for me to die as well as to be born, I instantly cast off all fear or thought whatever of death, and went through the whole of my duty with alacrity; pleasing myself with the hope, if I survived the battle, of relating it and the dangers I had escaped to the dear Miss Guerin, and others, when I should return to London."

Jane Austen's brother, Charles, captained the ship 1811-1814.
Cable Street The Young'uns

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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HMS Namur
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2012, 21:57:31 »
Cable Street The Young'uns

 

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