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Author Topic: Lympne Castle  (Read 5720 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Lympne Castle
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2017, 21:09:21 »
The Times – 3rd October 1916

Castle as Canadian Hospital

Lympne Castle, Kent, has been lent by Mrs. Frederick Tennant to Mrs. Fleming, daughter-in-Law of the late Sir Standford Fleming, engineer of the Canadian Pacific Railway, for use as a convalescent hospital for Canadian non-commissioned officers and men.  It was opened yesterday by Princess Arthur of Connaught.

Offline kyn

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Lympne Castle
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2012, 16:15:11 »




Lympne Castle was built during the 13th century on the site of a Roman castle, Port Lemanis (locally called Stutfall Castle).  The remains of this earlier castle can be seen below the hill on which Lympne Castle stands, having slipped down the hill over the years.



Stones from the ruined castle were used to build an abbey and a church, (believed to be where Thomas à Becket once stayed) it is these remains that were strengthened and extended to construct the new castle.



During Tudor times the castle was rented as a farmhouse and was sold in 1860, after which it was left to decay.  The castle was bought in 1905 by Sir Richard Lorimer and was restored.  During the restoration the original buildings were extended and modern buildings were incorporated into the castle.



The castle still has its ‘great hall’, wooden roof beams and gothic arched windows, helping to earn it Grade I listed status.



The castle was used during the Second World War as an observation post.



 

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