News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
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Author Topic: All Saints, Ulcombe  (Read 6678 times)

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grantleydawn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2013, 21:12:19 »
Thankyou, yes I had noticed those photos. (Versions of which I already had)

I also have a photo of the brass that you describe as "has been mounted on the wall, it is from the tomb of Rudolph St. Leger and his wife and is dated 1470".
The photo that I have was taken when it was on the floor.
I don't think that I can post it, as I failed to record it's source.

Regards
Grantley

Offline kyn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2013, 11:32:43 »
You may have already seen these two but they are the same name you are looking for :)

grantleydawn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2013, 01:50:32 »
If you or anyone else ever visits this church again and would love to post some more photos, I have a couple of requests, please. They are my ancestors.


As per “The Peerage of Ireland” Vol. VI. by John Lodge (1789) page 93 ;
"He lies buried in Ulcomb Church, with this inscription over his grave ;
     Here lyeth John Seintleger Esquyer, and
     Margerie his Wyfe, sole Daughter and
     Heir of James DONNETT ----- 1442.

(I believe that your photo of, the knight in brass, is supposed to be the above John St. Leger.)



As per “The Peerage of Ireland” Vol. VI. by John Lodge (1789) page 92 ;
"Ralph St. LEGER who about 1195, was one of those Kentish gentlemen, that accompanied K. Richard I. to the siege of Acon in the Holy-Land, in which war, he served the space of fifteen years, as an inscription, on the lid of his coffin in the church of Ulcomb, imports."

Regards
Grantley

Offline kyn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2013, 23:35:42 »
You are very welcome :)

grantleydawn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2013, 20:43:39 »
Living in South Australia means that I will never get to this church.
The photos helped me look through the church of my ancestors.
And the real bonus was an image that I had been searching for.
Thankyou.
Grantley

Offline kyn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 16:06:10 »
Thank you :)  It was so light in here it was reasonably easy to photograph!

busyglen

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 14:44:23 »
Great pictures Kyn!  :)

Offline kyn

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2012, 20:45:24 »
Thanks :)  This one was full of treasures!  And yes there were a few green patches!

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2012, 14:57:41 »
Great pics Kyn - looks like it needs a little damp proofing and mould scraping in the chapels :-(

Offline kyn

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All Saints, Ulcombe
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2012, 14:22:51 »


From the minute I entered this church I fell in love with it.  The sense of room and light was unusual; with only a few I have visited being so large. 



The church is larger than those usually found in small villages and the reason for this is that a College of priests was established here by Archbishop Stephen Langton between 1213 and 1215.  It is said that William the Conqueror stood on the site of the church and ordered the erection of a church at this spot.


 


The church is built of Kentish ragstone and is of Norman origin, some features still exist to reflect this.  In the nave the north wall has the outlines of two typical Norman windows. 
 


Many early features can be found in the church, pointed arches from the transitional period can be found in the chancel alongside a 13th century screen and five misericords for the use of the five priests at the nearby college.


 


















The arch into the chancel is of 14th century origin and is said to be one of the highest in Kent.   In the sanctuary there is an aumbrey flanked by two arched recesses, a result of a complaint during a Visitation in 1560.  One of the recesses holds a piscina.





In the Lady Chapel you can find a piscina and three stone corbels used to support statues.  On the arcade leading to the chapel is a ragged scar where an image of Our Lady was hacked down during the Reformation.








The north chapel, known as the St. Leger Chapel, was built in the Tudor period, it has a 15th century screen thought to be the remains of a rood screen.


 




The font is from the 19th century but seems to have the original lead bowl from the earlier font.





In the north aisle a brass has been mounted on the wall, it is from the tomb of Rudolph St. Leger and his wife and is dated 1470.  Another is for William Maydeston, Knight and is dated 1419.


 

 






The north aisle also has the rood stairs that once led to the rood loft.







In various areas of the church, but mostly in the south aisle, are some beautiful medieval wall paintings and decoration.  The most striking, and the one you see as you walk through the door, is of St. Michael and the Devil weighting souls.  Others include Dives and Lazarus, Christ on the cross and an interesting sketch of five faces, thought to be priests.



















The tower is 14th century which holds six bells.



Some other pictures…











 

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