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Author Topic: Clay Pipes  (Read 15094 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2013, 12:09:05 »
Some pictures from Greyuncle.  One is Royal Ancient Order of Buffaloes but he is unsure of the other crest, both thought to have been found at a Victorian skip in Strood.  Can anyone identify it for him?

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2013, 17:05:47 »
Some parts from the Amherst Hill site in Brompton.

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2013, 10:34:46 »
That is great, thank you :)

Offline scoop

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2013, 10:13:04 »
Possible maker?
1901 Census RG13 piece 723 folio 45 page 28

67a, The Common, Rochester St Nicholas

LEACH, Charles - Head - 48 - Tobacco Pipe Manufacturer
LEACH, Emma - Wife - 47
LEACH, Charles - Son - 24 - General Engine Fitter
LEACH, Arthur - Son - 19 - Tobacco Pipe Maker
LEACH, Leonard - Son - 15 - Tobacco Pipe Maker
LEACH, Sidney - Son - 17 - Labourer Oil Mills


Offline Paul

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2013, 20:56:12 »
The smaller ones tend to be older as Tobacco was more expensive, As it got cheaper the pipes got bigger.
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2013, 18:47:17 »
The picture below shows part of a pipe found at Fort Amherst, it is small and about the size of all the ones I have so far seen or found.  The larger one I found in my back garden!

Offline Alastair

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2013, 12:57:48 »
In the last house we lived in, a new build, I dug up handfuls of clay pipe fragments while digging the garden. I thought at the time that a great deal of these pipes must have been used, given their fragile nature. I suspect the life of a clay pipe was very short.

Regards makers - in my research in Parish Baptism records the Father's occupation is sometimes recorded as 'clay pipe maker' so Parish Records may be a place to start looking for the makers of Kyn's pipes.

Alastair

Chatham Boy

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2013, 12:41:34 »
I remember walking along the beach between Upnor and Cockham wood a couple of times, probably about ten or fifteen years ago now, with a female friend of mine, collecting fragments of clay pipes that she used to make jewellery with. We didn`t have to look very hard to find plenty. I remember she had a large box filled to the brim of fragments she had found both there and at Riverside Country Park in Gillingham.

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2012, 11:56:54 »
Most of these bits were found along by Cockham Wood Fort, if that helps.

Offline smiler

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2012, 11:04:06 »
A mate of mine was foreman when the houses near the Pier were built in Upnor. These were built on top of a Victorian tip where 100s of bottles of different shapes and sizes were found and 1000s of pieces of clay pipes, probably a lot of these found their way to the beach.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2012, 09:50:37 »
There were so many comings and goings up the Medway in the victorianish period. Cargo, sailors, hay on the barges and rubbish and ash coming back for cleansing the city or brick making etc. The pipe could have originated from many places and, as you say, especially London. It would be really nice if Leach/leack was a local maker or retailer though. I found the KHF thread on Hinkins, a local Chatham pipe maker where I thought there was a photo of a pipe, when I have time I will take a picture and put one on there.

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2012, 21:48:35 »
Thanks sheppey_bottles, I know some of the items found along the Medway originated in London so it may not be a local manufacturer.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2012, 21:42:34 »
I had a search to see if I could find your pipe maker Kyn but no luck. If someone has local directories for Chatham and Rochester the name may be listed in one, looking at the decoration on the stem it is probably later 19th century. The trouble is so much went on in this area the pipe could have come from any town and tossed over the side of a ship maybe. Some of my pipes have the makers name on one side and the town on the opposite which makes life easier.

Offline kyn

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2012, 19:56:43 »
I really like the first one, I couldn't find any information on the makers though.

Offline busyglen

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Re: Clay Pipes
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 19:49:08 »
Interesting!  :)
A smile is a curve that straightens things out.

 

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