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Author Topic: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard  (Read 7066 times)

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Offline cliveh

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2012, 09:15:48 »
Off topic slightly, but those steps are where Nelson left to take command of HMS Agamemnon (64) at the start of the French Revolutionary War in 1793. As an amusing aside, Hugh Jackman slipped at the bottom of those steps and ended up on his backside in the mud while filming a scene of 'Les Miserables' earlier this year to cries of 'Hugh, Hugh are you ok?' from the various assembled flunkeys. You had to be there to see it to see how funny it was :)

I believe the steps are known as 'The Queen's Stairs'. After which Queen I do not know. I think there's another set of steps further along the wall near the dry docks known as the 'King's Stairs'?

cliveh

busyglen

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 16:28:08 »
That picture brings back memories of the hours I used to spend with my husband at that building when the Sea Cadets used to have boat races on Sports Day, years ago.  That point, was the end of a race.  I can still hear the cheering when whatever Unit was winning, passed the flag. :) 

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 16:02:52 »
Off topic slightly, but those steps are where Nelson left to take command of HMS Agamemnon (64) at the start of the French Revolutionary War in 1793. As an amusing aside, Hugh Jackman slipped at the bottom of those steps and ended up on his backside in the mud while filming a scene of 'Les Miserables' earlier this year to cries of 'Hugh, Hugh are you ok?' from the various assembled flunkeys. You had to be there to see it to see how funny it was :)
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline kyn

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2012, 12:51:33 »
A view from the river.

Jupiler

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2008, 07:31:48 »

We're running trains again this weekend so I'll be there on Saturday - I'll try to find out a bit more about the period for which it was open.

I think it closed as a club/pub about two/three years ago but some of my 'colleagues' may remember better than me.

Although it was technically a club which required membership to get served, casual visitors were covered by a day membership so it wasn't exclusive at all.

The bar was on the ground floor (to the right of the main part of the building in your photograph), the small kitchen was in the area of the two downstairs windows in your photo, and it
was also possible to sit upstairs and out on the river-facing balcony up there too.

Offline kyn

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2008, 21:34:59 »
I've never known this building to be open!  Thank you for adding that info  :)

Jupiler

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Re: Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2008, 21:32:38 »

......and for a few years recently the building served as The Harbourmaster's Club, a licensed premises within the grounds of the Historic Dockyard where (amongst other things) one could buy the brews of the brewery in the Dockyard.

Pity it closed down, was only a short walk for refreshment after a driving or firing turn on the Dockyard Railway.

Still, the KGV in Brompton is a suitable replacement watering hole!


Offline kyn

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Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster's Office, Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2008, 13:14:10 »
Built in 1770, this Scheduled Ancient Monument was built next to the main entry point from the river during the age of sail.  The building was the office of the dockyard's two Master Attendants who were generally ex-naval Captains or Masters and were principal officers of the dockyard.  They were responsible for the ships moored in the River Medway, whether for repair of in reserve.

During the 19th Century the job was taken over by the King or Queen's Harbourmaster, the was usually taken by a senior officer of the yard and the duties performed were carried out by his assistant who worked form this building.  The whole of the tidal part of the river, from Allington Lock in Maidstone to sheerness was designated as a Dockyard Port and became the responsibility of the Assistant Queen's Harbourmaster who was in charge of all movement within the river between these points.


 

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