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Author Topic: Petition Spinning rooms  (Read 8851 times)

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Far away

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2013, 09:28:12 »
I found it surprisingly much like what people write today, and much different to the warbly waffle often found in descriptive texts by educated people in, for example, the 1912 Encyclopaedia Britannica, or the church descriptions by Arthur Mee.

I believe that, from the point of view of understanding history as recorded in such texts, we should divorce ourselves from the auto-social response of criticising modern life and realize that everything written in this forum is written by people living today - in the modern world, normal people.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2013, 18:16:36 »
The petition is a very good attempt, nice choice of words - but the punctuation is abysmal and some of the sentences are never ending, switching subjects, going on elsewhere, then adding some stuff irrelevant to the sentence, what a great age we live in, before returning to the point.

All in all, the writer has some experience, though probably more in speaking to a group than in the actual writing. And she/he has that rather odd habit of unpractised writers of capitalising nouns that happen to feel important.

For something written as late as 1875 I agree the punctuation is poor but probably not that unusual. If it was a legal document it would not be unusual at all as any family historian who's tried to transcribe a Will or any other official document from that time or before will testify. It was thought that the use of punctuation could confuse how a document was read leading to disputes. In fact it was not until the 1881 Conveyancing Act that Parliament began to insert full stops in Acts of Parliament and commas were not introduced until the 1925 Law of Property Act!

Just a bit of useless irrelevant info!  :)

cliveh

Far away

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2013, 15:01:04 »
The petition is a very good attempt, nice choice of words - but the punctuation is abysmal and some of the sentences are never ending, switching subjects, going on elsewhere, then adding some stuff irrelevant to the sentence, what a great age we live in, before returning to the point.

All in all, the writer has some experience, though probably more in speaking to a group than in the actual writing. And she/he has that rather odd habit of unpractised writers of capitalising nouns that happen to feel important.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2012, 20:52:01 »
Good stuff Longpockets, thanks.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline kyn

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2012, 20:16:11 »
Thanks Longpockets :)

Offline peterchall

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2012, 19:54:36 »
Many thanks :)
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful


Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2012, 18:43:31 »
It is not written in 'management speak' either. A nice piece of writing all round, just goes to show how misled we are by others who know about education during this era.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2012, 13:11:04 »
How I agree with you Bromptonboy, so much better than all the 'text speak' these days.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2012, 11:56:41 »
On reading the petition I am moved to comment on how well written and worded it is. Far better indeed than much of what is written today by our educated classes.

Offline kyn

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2012, 07:28:52 »
Thank you for adding that Herb Collector.

I haven't managed to find out more about the petition yet.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2012, 00:09:15 »
I was intrigued by this;

............  and taking into account the extraordinary effect the dust has upon our constitution which prevent us looking like the same woman after a few months confinement in the Ropery.   

And did a little research.
An occupational hazard of rope making, as well as similar trades such as cotton mill workers, was that the dust produced caused eye infections and the lung disease Byssinosis.
Byssinosis, also called brown lung, cotton workers lung and mill fever, was caused by exposure to dust from hemp, flex, cotton and sisal in inadequately ventilated working conditions.
Symptoms. Breathing difficulties, chest tightness, wheezing and coughs.
Can lead to chronic bronchitis.

Offline kyn

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2012, 23:51:19 »
I don't know, I just post the information I get my hands on :)

I will have a look around and see if I can find out!

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2012, 22:38:03 »
What was the result?

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline kyn

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Petition Spinning rooms
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2012, 16:48:00 »
To the Captain Superintendent of HM Dockyard Chatham.

Sir,

We the undersigned beg most respectfully to state, that we have heard with regret and alarm the alteration of working time that is about to take place in the Spinning Room and we beg if you most seriously and earnestly to use your powerful influence in preventing the same from being carried out for the following reasons.  A great portion of us are widows, with families and would be injured in a pecuniary point by a longer absence from our families than at present, for we shall be compelled to pay more the care of our children.  Many of us take them to nurseries for the Day, but then we should be prevented for they would not be open early enough in the morning and they are closed before six at night, besides the money received for our days work is not sufficient for the maintenance of our families and we are compelled to work at night and if retained until a quarter past six instead of twenty minutes past five o’clock it would deprive us of the money we should earn in that time, hence starvation would exist and the workhouse would follow and taking into account the extraordinary effect the dust has upon our constitution which prevent us looking like the same woman after a few months confinement in the Ropery.  And we do beg of you; for the sake of our children and for the sake of ourselves both physically and pecuniary, that you will comply with this very humble request.  We beg to Remain, Honoured Sir, your very Humble Servants.

1Louisa Good
2Mary Lynch
3Susan Weaver
4Sarah Foreman
5Mary Ann Munden
6Mary Stanton
7Sarah Trelligar
8Hannah Connor
9Agnes Ledger
10Jane Tucker
11Amelia Malory
12Sarah LEaking
13Elizabeth Daly
14Eliza Medhurst
15Priscilla Newey
16Harriet Lister
17Harriet Lister
18Rosanna Frederick
19Sarah Moon
20Mary Ann Coufield
21Margrate Collins
22Mary Thomas
23Emma Miller
24Sarah Fryer
25Sarah Akherst
26Elizabeth Frisby
27Anne Bath
28Ellen Guesstead
29Mary Anne Grubb
30Margaret Corking
31Hannah Dowdells
32Fanny Greenstead
33Henetray Sedgwick
34Eliza Drage
35Emma Stroud
36Mary Brudsman
37Ellen Gibbons
38Sarah Wren
39Louise Hall
40Margaret Wells
41Margaret Quinn
42Priscila Bush
43Margaret O’Brien
44Elizabeth Dingle
45Mary Morris
46Margrata Blaney
47Emily Foster
48Mary Ann Giibson
49Charlotte Broad
50Maria Browning
51Rachel Bush
52Charity Peaks
53Ann Thorscroft
54Jane Weekess
55Eliza Leurman
56Mary Constable
57Lydia Seward
58Mary Bush
59Mary Hoskins
60Elizabeth Lexford
61Mary Hillayson
62Lusia Lourdell
63Mary McDonough
64Carrie Gallaven
65Caroline Tapsell
66Charlotte Grey
67Eliza Marshall
68Eliza Larrington
69Eliza Crust
70Luisa Coggar
71Mary Jane Lusiman
72Ellen O’Connor
73McCarthy
74Anne Taylor
75Annie Long
76Agnes Mills
77Sarah Thorscroft
78Sarah Dessfaton
79Mary Ann Elland
80Elizabeth Brooker
81Luisa Knight
82Elizabeth Baker
83Kate Winehouse

Letter received on 2nd July 1875

 

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