News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)  (Read 15952 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 974
  • Appreciation 74
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2017, 00:13:01 »
1001 cleans a big big carpet for less than half a crown

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3wacuIsdug

Sorry Bilgerat, couldn't resist  :) but congratulations are in order
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Bilgerat

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1017
  • Appreciation 235
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #24 on: October 11, 2017, 21:37:05 »
The original post has been updated with plans, a rewritten introduction and pictures restored....

Oh and I've just noticed, this is my 1001st post :)
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Piglet 88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Appreciation 0
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2017, 19:23:12 »
and WITH a figurehead.
Sorry....just noticed my error.

Offline Piglet 88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Appreciation 0
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2017, 09:19:26 »
An excellent ship model.
HMS Temeraire and her figurehead. There is an argument that she started off without, then 'later' during a refit / rebuild was given a figurehead....but it is something I still do not know for definite. A while back I was in correspondence with Cliff Lloyd, who made a model of the Temeraire for HMS Temeraire, Portsmouth. He decided to go with the fiddle head.
So if proved right...the Temeraire can be portrayed with a fiddle head and without a figurehead.

Offline Bilgerat

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1017
  • Appreciation 235
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2017, 23:48:45 »
I found these while reviewing my essay about HMS Temeraire's sister-ship HMS Neptune. These photos are of a 15ft model of HMS Temeraire built by Stephens and Kenau in South Africa for a New Zealand movie company. What is interesting is that contrary to the post about the ship having a nondescript fiddle-head rather than a figurehead, the ship did actually have a figurehead. Stephens and Kenau do extensive research into the subjects of their models and strive to make them as accurate as possible, so the figurehead shown on this model is accurate.



"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Piglet 88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Appreciation 0
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2017, 06:28:41 »
Edward William Cooke painted - Ships of war in the Medway, off Sheerness, in 1833.
According to Grant Uden, in his book, The Fighting Temeraire (1961), he found evidence that this is also our Temeraire. This painting is also in the Victoria and Albert Collection ....  and has nothing about the Temeraire in the write up.

Offline Piglet 88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Appreciation 0
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2017, 07:25:02 »
Thank you Conan.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 974
  • Appreciation 74
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Piglet 88

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Appreciation 0
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2017, 10:03:19 »
Has anyone seen the other painting of the Temeraire, by John Constable? It is called - His Majesty's ship "Victory", Capt. E. Harvey, in the memorable battle of Trafalgar, between two French ships of the line.
It is in the Victoria and Albert collection. If you look at the main ship, it is not the Victory, she is probably the one on the right of the picture. Another clue is in the title, as it clearly shows Eliab Harveys name, not Hardy.

There are one or two drawings about showing the Temeraire with her 'Fiddlehead' instead of a figurehead. Both Turner and Pocock have this detail in there sketches.

I am not sure how to attach pictures, maybe someone more computer aware could?

It was Turner`s picture which got me interested the the Temeraire. I went the the National Gallery`s exhibition back in about 1995. Since then, my two main interests have been the crew at Trafalgar and the surviving items made from the Temeraire.

Offline Dave Smith

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 260
  • Appreciation 10
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2016, 13:37:53 »
Maid of Kent; you sound a bit like me, a bit of a perfectionist (not always successful I'm afraid). I too prefer the Turner as it is giving atmosphere, not necessarily accuracy- as bilgrat says, a fantasy- painting.

Offline Maid of Kent

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 141
  • Appreciation 11
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2016, 22:52:40 »
I hardly dare to raise this query, having read this most interesting of themes. It is a painting I have always admired greatly and the last picture by a different artist has its merits too. BUT surely it must be sunrise not sunset, if they are leaving Sherness at 7.30 am and moving in an north west direction to get into the Thames, the sun is being shown on the RHS behind the ships would roughly be in the setting position for October at that point (and for the sunrise it would have to be on the painting's LHS). The answer could be that it shows it being moored for the night and they are facing down stream for the sun to be in the position it is shown. Doesn't matter really I suppose - its a great painting and not many will worry about the topography of the Thames!

Offline Bilgerat

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1017
  • Appreciation 235
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2016, 21:57:39 »
Although "The Fighting Temeraire" is without doubt a truly beautiful piece of art, it is nevertheless, a fantasy.

This picture below, by Ivan Berryman is a much more accurate depiction of how the ship looked when towed to the breakers:

"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2013, 09:13:56 »

   Britains greatest landscape artist Joseph (J.M.W.) Turner finished this painting in 1838 which he affectionately referred to as "my darling". It is called The Fighting Temeraire and it shows the great gilded man-of-war being towed to her last berth, belching black smoke against the background of a brilliant sun.
   The picture was inspired by the fate of the warship which was launched at Chatham in 1798 as a substantial 98 gun fighting ship built of 5,000 Kentish oaks and manned by more than 700 men. She fought alongside Nelson's flagship The Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar and distinguished herself.
   Yet less than 40 years after that decisive victory she was no longer wanted. Sold to a London ship-breaker in 1837 this "heart of oak" was towed to Rotherhithe.
   J.M.H. Turner was 66 at the time and refused all offers to sell the painting. Many critics agreed that this four foot canvas was a "thing of beauty". Thackeray likened it to "a magnificent national ode, or a piece of music".

Offline Bilgerat

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1017
  • Appreciation 235
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2013, 12:51:00 »
I couldn`t say without either seeing the picture or perhaps knowing when it was painted. Many ships performed the role of Guardship at Sheerness of perhaps HMS Temeraire was the most famous.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 466
  • Appreciation 36
Re: The Fighting Temeraire (1798 - 1838)
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2013, 08:56:00 »
Billgerat, lovely blog re the Temeraire. Please would you know if a painting in the Royal Holloway University of London picture gallery titled "Guard Ship at Sheerness " is of the Temeraire, the staff at the Uni weren't sure.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines