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Author Topic: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury  (Read 5957 times)

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TWWW

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2013, 14:09:53 »
Or possibly a Dene Hole.

Offline Far away

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2012, 12:49:10 »
Well, the maps for around 1870 seem to show a 'Chalk Fm' or 'Old Chalk Fm' in about that location. I suppose it could mean it is a former well or basement?

Offline stewyrey

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2012, 22:58:05 »
The "structure" seems to be marked on the old maps.
 
  The 1970 map shows a "structure" and so does a 1932-38 map, which could mean
 no wartime connection.

   stewyrey.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2012, 12:42:03 »
The position with a wide field of fire makes sense if it were a gun position or observation post, rather than a covert 'hide-away' for HG special forces.
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Offline Admiral D Ascoyne

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2012, 12:12:28 »
The defensive theory a strong one, the view from this position does cover the whole of what would have been a valley and marsh across to the dockyard and the approaches to Frindsbury.
The slabs are proper polished granite, there is is a disused chalk pit very nearby which could be a link?
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2012, 17:03:25 »
As far as I can recall, the tank-trap cylinders were about 3ft high by about 2ft 6in dia, so what the object in the photo is depends on its size, but it does have a fair amount of green moss. They were quite common - there were at least 6 at the top of Queen Street, Rochester, and many scattered on the pavements around the bottom of Star Hill.

A Home Guard bolt hole would make a nice story and the only thing I can think of against is that it's in open country, but was the area wooded during WW2?
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Offline grandarog

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2012, 16:43:16 »
There doesn't seem to be enough age to the concrete cylinder to be WW2. Looks more like it is a home made garden roller that has been put there as a marker because it was redundant and just right to do the job. It would be nice if the slabs were covering a wartime bolthole for the Home Guard Special Defence Force. They had dugouts all over Kent in case of invasion. That would be too much to hope for. Definitely appears to be there to cover some underground hazard that the farmer wants to avoid.

Offline Far away

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2012, 13:45:43 »
Are the slabs granite or a concrete composite? From the photos that could be the granite look-alike composite of the type that was used here in Poland in Socialist times for anything from stairs to grave monuments.

They could be covering a former chalk mine, which I believe were often dug on field boundaries.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2012, 11:52:49 »
The cylindrical concrete block is a WW2 anti-tank block. They were kept on pavements at strategic road junctions, ready to be rolled into the road. The hole was for a steel bar to be inserted to give leverage to pull them on their sides for rolling, and to push them upright again. When in place the steel bar could be hammered into the road through the hole, to secure them.
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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2012, 10:32:35 »
Seems to be an expensive way to cap a well. These look polished, or was it wet? The normal way to cap a well was to throw as much junk down it as possible first then lay a mat of branches and cover with earth. Then tell all the farm hands where not to plough. Fine for a couple of generations then it gets forgotten and finally some poor soul falls through. Then it is capped with a concrete raft. However these look like decent pieces of granite that could have been bought for some specific purpose.

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Offline Admiral D Ascoyne

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Mystery granite slabs at Frindsbury
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2012, 10:23:05 »
Whilst out performing my employment duties I noticed a tree in the middle of a ploughed field nr Frindsbury Barn.
There are two granite slabs which at first I thought were graves but there are no markings etc, beside them is a round concrete marker.

I think the marker is to warn tractors not to go too near, perhaps its an old well?

Anyone have an idea?
Nostalgia's not what it used to be

 

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