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Author Topic: HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)  (Read 9775 times)

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petermilly

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Re: HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2013, 08:23:06 »
Thank you Bilgerat as you say off-topic but helps greatly to understand and appreciate the articles. Please consider a 'glossary'  :)
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Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2013, 22:48:27 »
the difference between say a '5th rate frigate' or a 1,2,3,4th or even what makes a 'ships of the line' is a bit of a mystery

A good point which deserves an answer, albeit slightly off-topic, but here goes anyway. The rating system classified a ship by the number of guns carried.

First Rate - 100 or more guns (not including carronades). These were the largest and most powerful ships in the world and owing to their prestige, were only given as flagships to the best connected or most famous flag-officers (Admirals etc.).

Second Rate - Between 81 and 99 guns. A (slightly) cheaper alternative to a first-rate. Up to about 1840, these carried their guns on three gundecks.

Third Rate - Between 61 and 80 guns. The most common type of ship of the line.

Fourth Rate - Between 45 and 59 guns. Until the mid-1750's, these were the smallest ships of the line. After about 1800, larger frigates carrying between 50 and 59 guns began to be built - these were also classed as 4th rate ships.

Fifth Rate - Between 31 and 44 guns.

Sixth Rate - Between 20 and 30 guns. The smallest ships which would normally be commanded by an officer with the rank of Captain.

Sloop of War - An ocean-going warship not carrying the minimum of 20 guns needed to be included in the rating system.

Post-Ship - A sixth-rate ship carrying less than 28 guns.

Frigate - A ship of at least 28 guns carrying her main guns on a single enclosed gundeck. Also referred to as 'Cruisers'.

Ship-of-the-line - A ship built to participate in set-piece naval battles, where stability, strength and firepower were more important than speed and agility. Mounted her guns on multiple gundecks.

Maybe this needs to be the subject of a separate topic - I'll leave that to the powers-that-be to decide. In the meantime, if anyone wants me to produce some kind of 'glossary of terms' I'd be happy to.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline mikeb

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Re: HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2013, 13:48:28 »
Another fine read about a Chatham ship Bilgerat, many thanks.

Have you thought of collating these write-ups into a book on Chatham built / based ships?

petermilly

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Re: HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2013, 09:04:25 »
Once again Bilgerat, a very interesting article. Thank you. As a newcomer to the historical maritime world, the difference between say a '5th rate frigate' or a 1,2,3,4th or even what makes a 'ships of the line' is a bit of a mystery but I eagerly await another article?  :)
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Offline Bilgerat

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HMS Tenedos (1812 - 1875)
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2013, 22:10:56 »
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

 

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