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Author Topic: Suicide burial  (Read 5262 times)

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Offline davpott

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2016, 14:59:50 »
I am not sure of the date of this " burial of the dead " as ,I think it was in the Eastchurch church notes " that any person found drowned on the beach ,shall be buried  where found on the beach .I have the date of this record somewhere .

Many years ago when I began tracing my family tree I used the Eastchurch parish records. I remember seeing a number of burial entries stating something like 'stranger found floating in the sea' or 'stranger washed up on the shore'.
There must have been a fair few greenhorns falling over the side of sailing ships and vessels heading east on the Thames.

I'd guess the reference CDP found may have been in place during a period of financial hardship to save the parish the expense of burying strangers.

Offline CDP

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2016, 10:48:29 »
I am not sure of the date of this " burial of the dead " as I think it was in the Eastchurch church notes, " that any person found drowned on the beach, shall be buried where found on the beach. I have the date of this record somewhere.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Lutonman

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2016, 19:44:04 »
The cannon of the Church of England says
"B 38 Of the burial of the dead
1. In all matters pertaining to the burial of the dead every minister shall
observe the law from time to time in force in relation thereto, and, subject
to this paragraph in general, the following paragraphs of this Canon shall
be obeyed.
2. It shall be the duty of every minister to bury, according to the rites of
the Church of England, the corpse or ashes of any person deceased within
his cure or of any parishioners or persons whose names are entered on the
church electoral roll of his parish whether deceased within his cure or
elsewhere that is brought to a church or burial ground or cemetery under
his control in which the burial or interment of such corpse or ashes may
lawfully be effected, due notice being given; except the person deceased
have died unbaptized, or being of sound mind have laid violent hands
upon himself, or have been declared excommunicate for some grievous
and notorious crime and no man to testify to his repentance; in which
case and in any other case at the request of the relative, friend, or legal
representative having charge of or being responsible for the burial he
shall use at the burial such service as may be prescribed or approved by
the Ordinary, being a service neither contrary to, nor indicative of any
departure from, the doctrine of the Church of England in any essential
matter: Provided that, if a form of service available for the burial of
suicides is approved by the General Synod under Canon B 2, that service
shall be used where applicable instead of the aforesaid service prescribed
or approved by the Ordinary, unless the person having charge or being
responsible for the burial otherwise requests."

Offline CDP

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2016, 09:39:33 »
When I was a lad in the 1940s, I was told that suicides (or was it Jews ?) were buried in a very, very small plot in the extreme right hand corner at the Halfway Cemetery facing the main road. It was sectioned off with a few headstones. It is still there I believe.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline linyarin

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2013, 12:18:16 »
Normally at an inquest if the person had committed suicide it was adjudged that it was 'suicide during temporary insanity'. This was the verdict on my great grandfather in 1901, and he was buried in Chatham Cemetery. This verdict allowed them to be buried normally.

Many thanks for this information as it seems to answer a question regarding the burial of someone I've been looking into.

Minsterboy

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2013, 11:00:51 »
One of my relatives committed suicide in Sheerness in 1926 and was buried in Halfway cemetery straight after, so there doesn't appear to have been a veto on such burials. He is in an unmarked grave, as are very many in the cemetery due to poverty, but I have subsequently found the grave after being given the relevant information and plot map by SBC in the Gateway in Sheerness.
If you have the name and death date they should be able to help you. Bear in mind though that the date that they show will be the burial date, which can be a little while after the death.

Offline scintilla

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2013, 09:30:39 »
Normally at an inquest if the person had committed suicide it was adjudged that it was 'suicide during temporary insanity'. This was the verdict on my great grandfather in 1901, and he was buried in Chatham Cemetery. This verdict allowed them to be buried normally.

I have transcriptions for burials at Halfway Cemetery. If you post the name of your great grandmother (or if you prefer not to post PM me) and I will check if she was buried there.

Offline kyn

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2013, 19:58:35 »
There was often a separate area for burials such as this within churchyards.  Her parish church would likely have an area for this.

Offline scoop

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Re: Suicide burial
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2013, 16:41:28 »
Have you looked here http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~penney/cemetary/cemetary.htm for her?  There is a more complete list of these records in Sheerness library (or there was, last time I visited).  Alternative cemetery maybe is Holy Trinity, Queenborough for which the records are held at Kent History and Library Centre, Maidstone http://www.kentarchives.org.uk/Calmview/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CKS-P295%2f1%2fE%2f4.

Pete Beach

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Suicide burial
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2013, 16:19:28 »
Hi All
Could anyone out there help me? My Great Grandmother committed suicide in August 1922 and according to family legend was not allowed to be buried in Halfway cemetery. Hence I have no idea where she may lie at rest. Was there such a ban in those days and, if so, does anyone know what would have happened to her?
Thanks
Pete Beach

 

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