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Author Topic: Pre-Reformation Churches  (Read 5099 times)

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Offline davpott

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Re: Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2013, 22:57:06 »
These certainly aren't definitive maps of the ancient parishes. (for example Dunkirk is listed and that is a Victorian parish). But they will give you some idea where they are.

http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Libr/MIs/Location/01.htm
http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Libr/MIs/Location/02.htm

Hasted lists describes every church and chapel in Kent of the late 1700s here  http://www.british-history.ac.uk/catalogue.aspx?gid=99

As Far Away has already pointed out you are unlikely to find any in England that have the appearance of a pre-reformation church. I've certainly never heard of one nor can I think there was anyway any could have escaped being made over by the puritans.

There are certainly a few that have some visible vestiges of pre-reformation worship but they a fairly rare and you have to know what you are looking for. Kyn has many photos on the forum of numerous churches, she would have taken a picture of anything interesting she saw.

Offline davpott

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Re: Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2013, 22:36:32 »
(This is by no means definitive, to do so would need far more than the 500 or so here)


Don't forget it was a gradual change and largely driven, at a secular level anyway, by political forces to begin with more than desire for religious change.
 
The Henrician break from Rome was driven by his need to produce a legitimate male heir and his daughters dis-inherited by the annulment of his marriage to Catherine. Henry was a very devout catholic with no desire to start a new branch of Christianity.
While the Act of Supremacy made Henry head of the church in England it was at that time no more than English or Henrician catholicism. 

It was following the accession of Edward VI which was effectively the regency of his uncle the Duke of Somerset. That the first changes that lead to a protestant church of England began. The chanceries were suppressed, images were whitewashed and the acceptance of the bible in English along with Archbishop Cranmer’s English prayer book and his articles of religion which notably distanced the two churches.
In Kent there was both widespread acceptance of the reforms in the Lutheran areas (mainly the weald) and widespread opposition elsewhere. Even in the staunch radical areas it doesn’t appear to have been such sweeping changes as the ones that came little over fifty years later.   

However this protestant influence was short lived with Mary claiming the throne on the death of Edward in 1553. Once again, albeit oddly with Mary still head of the church in England, we became a Roman Catholic country again. The churches would have returned to the appearance that was much the same as they looked before the reformation began.

This about-turn was short lived with Elizabeth ascending the throne in 1559. Elizabeth was a conservative protestant; she was also, in the eyes of the Vatican, the bastard child of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn making it impossible for her to be accepted monarch of a Roman Catholic country. However Elizabeth was in her mid-twenties when she was crowned so able to rule the country on her own, unlike her half-brother Edward who was only 15 when he died and had a Council and Regent effectively ruling throughout his reign.
Elizabeth had seen the turmoil the country had endured for the last twelve years. She chose a very middle of the road religious policy. It wasn’t without its problems but the reader can easily find out more online. As far as the physical parish churches were concerned the churches would have still looked much as they did under Henry VIII. Albeit not so well looked after.

The real changes occur following death of Elizabeth in 1603. While she had controlled the Calvinist and puritan pressures exerted upon her James I allowed the more radical clergy to influence decisions.

The Chancery chapels are again removed.
Wall paintingss are again removed.
Stained glass is broken
Candles and candle sticks are removed.
Chalices are remade into cups.

Stone altars are broken up and replaced with tables which are moved away from the east wall.
Pulpits appear
Music is seen as the noise of the devil and organs are generally removed.


In the 1630s Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud was allowed a freehand by Charles I to realign the church once again.
Once more the table became an Alter and placed against the east wall. His main aim was to revert back to the church of the early reformation of James I of the early 1600’s. His reforms were denounced as Catholicism.

The 1642 saw the Civil war and the Puritan rule of Oliver Cromwell followed by the equally puritan Commonwealth period until the restoration in 1660.

The appearance of today’s ancient parish churches is largely the result of the twenty years preceding the restoration. Any vestiges of the catholic worship were destroyed in that period. Any colour has been lime washed, no icons other than a simple cross etc etc.     

Offline CDP

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Re: Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2013, 13:16:51 »
Do  you mean " Catholic Churches ?"
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Far away

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Re: Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2013, 13:04:32 »
Pre-Reformation? I rather suspect that there was more change during the Reformation than during the Victorian era. Other than in terms of the fabric of the building, is there anything in Kent which comes close to representing the state it would have been pre-Reformation?


Offline davpott

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Re: Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2013, 20:24:58 »
Hi. I was wondering if anyone has a church built before the reformation in their parish? I am starting to write a piece on these lovely buildings. Thanks for any help.

There are over 400 ancient parishes in Kent so the majority of the C.O.E. churches will be pre-reformation. Your starting point must be Hasted to see what he has to say about the church before the Victorians began saving them.

Hurruck

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Pre-Reformation Churches
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2013, 18:44:37 »
Hi. I was wondering if anyone has a church built before the reformation in their parish? I am starting to write a piece on these lovely buildings. Thanks for any help.

 

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