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Author Topic: Harty Battery  (Read 9591 times)

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Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2018, 17:37:58 »
The battery had a long life and there appears to have been regular 'ball practise' fired out into the Swale between Shellness and Whitstable. I wonder how many cannon balls and mortar shells are lying in the mud waiting to be found?

Offline smiffy

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2018, 18:24:50 »
As the battery did not appear to be active until 1861, it would seem that the date given on the original photograph cannot be correct.

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2018, 10:21:11 »
It's a bit long-winded but below is a series of newspaper articles referencing the Harty Battery. From them it is possible to establish a timeline for the battery, an idea of what buildings were erected and when, and the strategic thinking behind the location chosen for the battery.

[b]Kentish Chronicle - Saturday 10 December 1859[/b]
Faversham - A battery for 2 guns is to be forthwith erected near Harty Ferry, the spot selected having been approved by the Government Inspector. Nearly £400 is already subscribed towards the maintenance of the Artillery- Corps, and a Rifle Corps is in course of formation. The Artillery will meet for drilling this Saturday evening in the Town Hall.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser - Tuesday 14 February 1860
The spot selected for the battery is directly opposite the Coast-guard Station, Harty Ferry, the land for which has been measured and marked out a surveyor appointed for that purpose during the past week in order to fix its price. This being done, the battery will be proceeded with at once. It is, however, stated that the captain has determined upon erecting a temporary battery near his residence for practice purposes until the other is completed.

Volunteer Service Gazette and Military Dispatch - Saturday 26 May 1860
FAVERSHAM — ArtiIIery Corps.—We are informed that it has been decided to purchase a piece of land near Harty Ferry, for the purpose of erecting a battery. The price agreed to be paid is £150. The battery is to be erected forthwith.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser - Saturday 28 July 1860
The Artillery Battery — Tuesday last. Colonel Williams, of the Royal Engineers, Chatham, came here for the purpose of marking out the site for the battery, which is to be erected for our gallant volunteers. He was accompanied to the spot at Harty-ferry by Major Munn, and with the assistance of that gentleman, “two-gun battery*' was marked out. This battery, it seems, is to be built out of the funds belonging (or rather to be provided by) the corps. As soon as the purchase of the land is complete, the platforms will, laid and small magazine erected, which, however, is to be at the Government expense. A sergeant of engineers is, we understand, to be sent to assist in constructing the battery and laying the platforms.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 14 August 1860
Artillery Corps.—The cost of land and making the battery at Harty Ferry estimated at £300. For this most desirable object the committee have resolved to appeal to the owners of property in the neighbourhood for the funds required.

Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette - Saturday 25 August 1860
The Artillery Corps.— Saturday evening this company marched to Harty Ferry and back, for purpose inspecting the ground purchased for erection of the battery. Two guns only are to mounted first, and will be surrounded an entrenchment twelve feel deep. Range for firing is direct towards the Nore; Shellness lying on the left hand, and Whitstable on the right, protecting this line coast against our venturesome neighbour, should he any time deluded into the idea that the little quiet bay of Whitstable would afford him a safe and unprotected landing. The work was commenced last week.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 02 October 1860
Second Kent Artillery Corps. —Rev. C. Collins, M.A., has been appointed honorary chaplain. The battery for the protection of the mouth of the creek is in course of erection at Harty Ferry.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 30 April 1861
2nd Kent Volunteer Artillery—This corps is progressing in a satisfactory manner. A floating target is being prepared, under the superintendence of their gallant captain, W. Hall, Esq., which will shortly be ready, and practice will then commence in earnest with shot and shell, at the battery, at Harty Ferry.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 04 June 1861
2nd Kent (Faversham) Artillery Volunteers — The members of this corps met at the battery, Harty Ferry, on Saturday, to commence firing practice with blank cartridge.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser - Tuesday 25 February 1862
FAVERSHAM. 2nd Kent Artillery Coups. —The 2nd Battery belonging to this corps marched to Harty Ferry battery on Saturday last, and had some excellent ball practice during the afternoon. Several shots struck the target, one at length cutting away the mooring, letting the target free. The members generally are attending with great perseverance to drill, which gives promise of the corps coming out in most efficient state in the forthcoming spring and summer.

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser - Tuesday 05 May 1863
The Artillery Volunteers. —Our local volunteer force met on Saturday evening for their usual drill. Captain Hall has been promoted major-commandant. This appointment will give general satisfaction, and will be hailed by all as an appropriate end well-merited acknowledgment of the invaluable services that gentleman has rendered to the volunteer movement in this neighbourhood. It will be recollected that the two-gun battery at Harty Ferry was formed mainly through his munificent aid, and that he likewise erected temporary battery on his own premises nearer the town for the convenience of the members, fitted up building as an armoury, and converted the school-room at Stonebridge into drill-room The corps, however, cannot but regret that the promotion will greatly interfere with his presence amongst them.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 09 July 1867
Inspection of the Artillery Corps. The annual inspection of the 2nd Kent Artillery Corps took place at I the Harty Battery on Saturday afternoon week, by Colonel Elwyn, R.A., Dover. The muster was only moderately numerous, but all the officers were present," viz. Colonel I Gladdish, Captain and Adjutant McKown, Captain-Commandant Bathurst, Captain Shepherd, Lieut Hall, Lieut, Whittle and Hon. Assistant-surgeon, Dr. Spyers. The I corps, having marched past, went through the manual and platoon exercises, and company drill, 1 bey then tired ten rounds from the 32-pounder guns, and "five from the mortar. The gun practice was exceedingly good, one shot carrying away the flag from off the "target. At the close the inspection Col. Elwyn addressed the corps. said he did know of any corps that came up to them in the way in which they performed their manual exercise, and general efficiency, but they were not quite so smart the guns as they might be, which perhaps, arose from their taking more time in their anxiety to do well. They were, however, a most efficient corps, and it would afford him much pleasure to report to that effect the War Office. The officers afterwards dined with Major Hall at Syndale.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 06 June 1871
Faversham. Great Gun Contest—The annual competition with the 32-pounders at Harty Ferry Battery by members of the Pavers ham corps took place on 3aturday. Nine detachments were present. The officers were Major Crookes, Captains McKown, Bathurst, and Shepherd, Assistant Surgeon Spyers, and Lieut. Whittle. James Tassell, Esq., and Miss Tassell, were amongst the spectators. The prises were won as follows: —The first of £7 Sergeant Spillett`s detachment, 32 points; the second of £5 by Bombardier Burney’s, 26; and the third of by Sergeant-Major P. Burney’s, 24. Major Crookes addressed the men afterwards in a short speech and referred to the lamented death of Colonel Gladdish, and also the satisfactory condition of the corps; after which. Capt. McKown made few remarks, and the corps returned home. The brigade challenge cup won by the corps last year at was exhibited at the battery in the course of the afternoon.

Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 21 January 1873
The 2nd Kent Artillery Corps. —The old and dilapidated shed at the Harty Ferry Battery is now being supplanted by one of a more suitable and substantial character, which is being erected by Messrs. Foord and Co., of Rochester, at a cost (to defrayed by the Government) of about £80. The measurement is 32 feet by 18 feet, and the floor is to be composed of solid concrete nine inches thick. Possession of the drill room near the Stone Bridge has been given up, and the gun hitherto used there has been removed to the headquarters in Preston-street, and mounted on platform in the centre the large room, where gun drill was commenced on Monday evening week. We are glad to learn that recruits continue to join the corps.

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 27 September 1873
On the 13th instant, the Faversham Artillery Corps met at the Harty Ferry Battery for great gun and mortar practice in the presence of Colonel Chermside, R.A., the Inspector of Artillery Volunteers for the South-Eastern District. The Adjutant of the lst Administrative Brigade (Captain McKown) was also present, and the officers of the corps in attendance were Captain Commandant Shepherd, Lieutenant Whittle, Lieutenant Murton-Neale, and the Assistant Surgeon, Dr. Spyers. The new sixty-four pounder rifled muzzle-loading gun was used on this occasion for the first time. From it fifteen shells were fired, nine of which were plugged, two were charged with sufficient powder to burst them, and the remaining four had only "blowing charges" them. Several of the non-exploded shell have since been recovered; and to give an idea of the force of this new piece of ordnance we may state that some of them were picked up nearly opposite to the Sportsman's Arms at Seasalter. There were also nine shells fired from one of the old thirty-two pounders, with good execution, the target being hit several times, after which twenty rounds were fired with the mortar. The practice throughout was very good, and Colonel Chermside expressed himself perfectly satisfied.

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 29 November 1879
New Magazine for the 2nd K.A.V. —We are glad to learn that the difficulty which the 2nd Kent Artillery Volunteers have for some time past experienced in regard to big gun practice owing to the fact of Major Majendie having condemned the building which had hitherto been used as a magazine, will shortly be overcome, the War Office authorities having, on the recommendation of Colonel Barry, and Colonel Sim, of the Royal Engineers, decided to erect a new magazine at Harty Ferry Battery. The work has already been commenced, Messrs. Foord and Son, Rochester, having taken the contract. It will be brick building, and will stand parallel with the present gun shed on the opposite side of the Battery.

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 07 October 1905
The Volunteers — There will be howitzer brigade practice at Harty Ferry to-day (Saturday). Luncheon will be provided for the Volunteers 12.30 and they will parade the Drill Hall at a quarter to one.

Offline conan

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2018, 20:12:57 »
From the 25 inch OS map



a close up



bing overlay

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Offline smiffy

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2018, 16:05:18 »
Map view c.1880:

Offline HartyBattery

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2018, 14:13:32 »
Hi there,

I know this is a bit of an old thread, but we've just moved into the house with the battery on the land! I'm very interested in compiling information about the battery (and the coastguard station house that we've moved into!) and we're going to do some work over the next year or so to restore as much of it as we can.. possibly with some help from one of the heritage organisations.

So far the information I can add to these posts is that there is a building that you can just about see from the other pictures which still has the words "CARTRIDGE STORE" above the door (pictures to follow) and you can see inside where the shelves were that would have held the munitions. My guess is that this is from the 1st world war usage and not the voluntary artillery use.

The concrete/brick plinths on the other side of the battery are interestingly angled down towards it, I'm guessing so that the cannons could rock back against the slope when fired.

Anyway, I'll come back with some pictures but if anyone else has any information or contacts that would be awesome!

Cheers,

Offline kyn

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2015, 19:00:18 »
Thank you so much for sharing these pictures.  It looks like it has been well looked after!

Offline davpott

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2015, 21:53:35 »
At last I got back down there with a camera in half decent light.

I hope they are of some interest.




Offline Paul

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2013, 13:22:37 »
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2013, 20:21:42 »
Memories of a night at Harty Ferry. One night in the early 1970’s, a boat with illegal immigrants was expected to make for either Essex or Kent. Four of us were sent to Harty Ferry (on the Faversham side). We had to park our car out of sight and then keep watch, on foot. It was pitch black and cold. All we got were the local ducks quacking which would make us jump!! Very glad to see daylight. Fortunately for us the boat did not choose the Swale but went direct up the Medway (caught with some 18 illegals at Rochester).

Offline busyglen

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2013, 15:54:58 »
There's some details of the Customs boats moored  at Harty here from the Censuses.  I did have some other info a while back, but I'm blowed if I can lay my hands on it at the moment.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~puxty/vessels.htm
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Offline davpott

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2013, 21:59:19 »
Smuggling and what we now call Customs were a large part of Kent life.  I think the subject deserves a thread of its own.

Offline kyn

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2013, 21:31:39 »
Thank you :)

Offline davpott

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2013, 21:18:13 »
I hope you remember where you read about it!


After much head scratching I finally remembered where I’d read about the Harty Ferry Battery.

Given the title of the booklet it is a little surprising that both the author allowed himself to get distracted, and that the editor didn’t strike out what is really irrelevant beyond a one line comment to the theme of the paper.

[brackets thus are my comments]

Source ‘Customs and Smugglers in the Port of Faversham 1200-1900’ Stuart Harrison (Faversham Papers No 115. 2011). pp117-118.

‘ ……contrary to its juxtaposition, the two-gun battery, now a ruin behind Harty Ferry [Coastguard] Cottages, did not relate to the Coast Guard but was provided much earlier for the Kent Artillery Volunteers and was partly financed by William Hall, the respected gunpowder factory owner, who became their commanding officer.

[Inserted a poor zerox copy of the picture posted earlier in this thread.]

Initially it seems the intention had been to create a much larger battery- Kentish Gazette 10th December 1859- “A battery for 20 guns is to be forthwith erected near Harty Ferry, the spot having been approved by the government inspector.” The Kentish Chronicle reported the following summer (25th August 1860) that “two guns only are to be mounted at first, and will be surrounded by an entrenchment twelve feet deep. The range for firing is direct towards Nore; Shellness lying  on the left hand, and Whitstable on the right. The work commenced last week.” The battery came into use in the summer of 1861 and a floating target was brought into use for the firing practice. (Note: the date 1850 in the postcard above was probably a mistake).

In an 1864 edition of his popular magazine “All the Year Around” , produced by Charles Dickens, the writer painted an evocative picture of the scene on the marshes when the Volunteers staged a military exercise in which detachments landing from three gun-boats staged a mock ‘attack’ on the two twenty-four pounder guns forming the battery:-
“The scene was a strange one ; to the left, aground like a stranded whale, stood the hull of a brig, now used as the coast-guard station, and tenanted by the chief boatman, who, with his family and friends, was calmly standing in the bows and watching the operations. From the shore, gun detachments , all plainly visible in the moonlight, were embarking to board the gunboats under the lee of the coast –guard ship……….while the horizon of the left was cut by black spars of a collier curiously suggestive of yard-arm execution, and of immediate readiness of those smugglers who once abounded these parts, and of those exploits Thomas Ingoldby has been the pleasantest narrator.”
 
[poor quality image entitled;  ‘Night Attack of the Kent Artillery Volunteers in Ore Creek near Faversham. Source cited ;Illustrated London News April 1864. ]

Offline smiffy

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Re: Harty Battery
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2013, 20:25:24 »
The view on Bing Maps seems slightly better.

 

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