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Author Topic: Pay Rates  (Read 6888 times)

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Offline pr1uk

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2014, 09:14:40 »
Cannot remember what I started on in 1965 but when i joined the Port Auxiliary Service (MOD Chatham Navel Base) in 1968 as an Able Seaman i was on 13/17/00. This i know as I found the pay rates for 1968 and we did a 42.5 hour week over 5 days plus there was always a duty crew on standby 24/7 so we did a lot of (forced) overtime. Normal working week was 0700 to 1630 but if you were on duty crew you did your normal 0700 to 1630 then you were on duty so attended our building near Bulls Nose and you stayed on duty until 0700 the next day then went straight onto the next working day. So if you started work Monday and was on duty that night you went home after the Tuesday's shift but our camp had bunks a TV and more importantly a proper bar.



To be contented in life you must learn the difference between what you want and what you need
-Peter

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2014, 13:41:14 »
Bryn ...were the printing works the old low fronted building in Crown Quay Lane behind Hales opposite the Odeon?

No, not there granderog, although I seem to recall that the KM had a small office approximately opposite the Odeon. The EKG office with the printing works at the rear were at 21 High Street, opposite St. Michael`s Church. Soon after I started the company bought the Queens Laundry and installed the bindery and machine room there. Although we `set up` the Gazette at 21 High Street, the paper was actually printed at Parrett`s works at Cecil Square, Margate on the same machine that printed the Isle of Thanet Gazette.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2014, 13:07:56 »
I started work in January 1962 having just turned 15 yrs in the previous November. This was in the furniture dept of Rix's in Gillingham High St, I was the very junior junior and received the princely sum of 1-14-5d a week, I gave my Mum  1 and the rest was mine  :) I can't really remember wage increases very much at all, but by the time I married in 1964 I was getting 4 a week !
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline grandarog

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2014, 12:53:18 »
Bryn ...were the printing works the old low fronted building in Crown Quay Lane behind Hales opposite the Odeon?

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2014, 11:38:44 »
I started at W. J. Parrett (East Kent Gazette) as an apprentice compositor in 1953/4 at 2.1s.7d. The Sittingbourne branch of the printing works closed on the day I finished my apprenticeship. First pay packet as a journeyman was in the region of 10 - 12 at Mackays of Chatham

Offline CDP

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2014, 11:20:41 »
I started work as an apprentice in Sheerness Dockyard in 1944 and earned 1-4s-8p per week  .And the next year it increased to 1-5s-10p. I gave my mother the 1 and I had the rest to buy my own clothes, entertainment, tools etc.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline helcion

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2014, 15:44:37 »
Started off as a Deck Boy on coasters in 1958 at 4/2/7 a week + overtime [funny how that figure sticks in my mind when nowadays I have trouble remembering what day of the week it is].

When I got my 'ticket' three years later & went deep-sea as an Officer my pay shot up to almost 10 a week [+ 7.5% bonus when on tankers], no overtime though.
Quite an acceptable wage at the time.

Offline Alastair

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2014, 14:46:54 »
Worked on a sheep station in Queensland as a Jackaroo (trainee/cheap labour) for 10 a week. Australian pounds - worth about 25/- - Later worked for a plumber digging septic tanks 6' deep and 4' round for 20 a week. Untold riches! Cash in hand as well.

Alastair

Offline ann

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2014, 12:09:03 »
Started work in 1963, commuting to London.  Wage was 8 per week (and had to pay own train fares).

Offline AlanH

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2014, 09:27:04 »
Still doing it Signals. Gave up smoking in '76 when working on Bougainville Isl and fags were 55c a pack of 20 B&H. Would have saved heaps if it wasn't for the evil drink and wimmin. :)
Cheers.
Alan.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2014, 17:59:52 »
Hi Alan H! So glad to see you spent your cash wisely  :) I bet Mr Toyer loved you.

Offline AlanH

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2014, 11:05:29 »
I remember being on very, very low wages as a first year apprentice at Manningtons in Gillingham and then Blaw Knox Rochester. Started at about 17 shillings a week from memory in 1959.
Lads in the pub (Bridge Wardens ) who did labouring on the M2 and other projects were on the princely wages of about 12 quid a week. I was just so jealous!
Then gradually as I got older my wage got better due mainly to being paid on a bonus scheme where extra was earned for saving time on assembling gearboxes etc.
When I was in my last couple of years of apprenticeship (time) the target for a skilled man in the assembly area was 1500 quid a year!!! That was in the late 60s.
Then I finished my time in Feb 1964 and virtually straight away jacked in and went contracting on various shut down or maintenance jobs all over the UK.
And all the lads who had boasted of their wages of 12 quid a week were still earning 12 quid and I was on well over 40 a week. :)
Oh happy days to see their glum faces and hear the complaint...."but you've got a trade and I haven't"!
But I spent it all on wimmin and booze so all things were equal in the end.
AlanH.

Offline Mike S

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2013, 15:34:23 »
Started work January 1960 at Maidstone and District Head Office for the princely sum of 3/5/0 per week, take home pay was 2/19/5.  That will just about buy 2 litres of Diesel for my car - how things have changed!

Offline linyarin

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2013, 12:42:36 »
My first paid work when I came back to Blighty in 1971 was as a sales assistant in a Victoria Street store: 13 a week and,with commission, sometimes reached the giddy heights of 16 for the week.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Pay Rates
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2013, 11:53:33 »
In 1953 I got a job as Receptionist at Russell's Garage in Chatham at a salary (Ie - no overtime, but work as many hours as needed!) of 9/week. Previously I was an hourly paid motor mechanic and a figure of 7/week comes to mind, but I can't be sure.

At Russell's part of my job was to cost the labour and we charged at 2.5 times the mechanic's wage - again not entirely sure, but a figure of 3/6 per hour plus extra for overtime comes to mind.

That was all paid in cash on Friday, then in 1954 I got a job at Medway College, paid into a bank monthly (I opened an account with the Trustee Savings Bank - not a 'proper' bank but, I think, no charges). Snag was I had to go a month without any income.

I can't remember what the salary was then, but I got a promotion from Lecturer Grade 1 to Lecturer Grade 2 in 1972 and remember noting the fact that I'd passed the 2000/year mark.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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