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Author Topic: Local accents - do they still exist?  (Read 37992 times)

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John38

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #71 on: November 14, 2013, 10:18:03 »
Yes I agree, Peter. Nevertheless the Blue Town bunch never said posts!

Offline peterchall

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #70 on: November 14, 2013, 10:11:57 »
To me a 'postie' is the person who delivers the post.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

John38

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #69 on: November 14, 2013, 09:41:12 »
When I first came to Sheerness I can remember that the plural of 'Post' was 'Posties' or 'Postie'. It puzzled me, but in later years I never heard it at all.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #68 on: November 13, 2013, 23:20:57 »
Then there's the double negative. "I never did nuffink" means "I did sumfink"
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #67 on: November 13, 2013, 23:00:57 »
S4, I was never treated quite so brutally, for ain't at least, but I eventually became bilingual, with ain't being OK in some contexts, but not in others.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #66 on: November 13, 2013, 22:50:39 »
.... I have had my ears boxed a few times by both parents and teachers for the use thereof. However you ain't gonna stop me...

As the teacher said to the chastised pupil: ain't ain't grammar, ain't ain't

That's the one. I remember it well, thanks Mr Beale of Chartham Primary.............

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #65 on: November 13, 2013, 22:36:48 »
.... I have had my ears boxed a few times by both parents and teachers for the use thereof. However you ain't gonna stop me...

As the teacher said to the chastised pupil: ain't ain't grammar, ain't ain't

John38

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #64 on: November 13, 2013, 19:00:34 »
This debate has been going on for centuries. When Caxton was trying to get the business end of printing going he was always struggling to overcome the difference in accents between counties,
Quote
...that comyn englysshe that is spoken in one shyre varyeth from another

He told of the two merchants returning to England who stopped in Kent to buy supplies. One of them, a Northerner, knocked on a farmhouse door and asked if he could buy some 'eggys' [eggs]. The farmer said, "Sorry I don't speak French". This annoyed the merchant who couldn't speak French either. The other merchant. a Southerner, asked to buy some 'eryen' and the farmer gave him eggs!

Caxton sought to reach a compromise in the printed word and modified it to 'egges'

'baint it' is a real West Country term, Busyglen

Offline busyglen

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #63 on: November 13, 2013, 18:35:01 »
I seem to remember that my Grandfather (many moons ago) used to occasionally say `Baint it'.  I wonder if that was meant to be `be not it?'
A smile is a curve that straightens things out.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #62 on: November 13, 2013, 18:27:12 »
As far as I'm aware the word 'ain't' fell from polite use at the beginning of Victoria's reign. It was deemed to be used by the lower classes and therefore fell out of use. I have had my ears boxed a few times by both parents and teachers for the use thereof. However you ain't gonna stop me..........

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #61 on: November 13, 2013, 17:52:19 »
Yeah, innit.

I've always taken for granted that this is reduced from ain't it, but various online dictionaries say it's a variant of isn't it, and synonym of ain't it.

I heard (and said) plenty of ain't or its various reduced forms around me in Kent in the 1930s and 1940s. It seems there was one particular difference compared with current usage of innit. When innit is used in tagged statements, it isn't modified to agree with the subject of the statement. Like this: I'm good, innit. I've never had a chance of hearing this on brief recent visits to the UK, I've only read about it. Googling doesn't seem to be helpful, plenty of hits ridiculing innit, few with informative examples of actual usage.

Ain't was always modified to agree with the subject in a tagged statement, like this: I'm good, ain't I: you're good, ain't ya; he's good, ain't 'e; it's good, ain't it.

John38

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #60 on: November 11, 2013, 13:59:25 »
You're right of course, Peter, it is annoying, but it has always been this way. Bokeham for example, writing in 1440, complained about the way the Mother Tongue had become corrupted following the Norman Invasion.

 "...[t]his corrupcioun of Englysshe men yn [t]heir modre-tounge"   

Offline peterchall

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #59 on: November 11, 2013, 12:16:56 »
There's a certain BBC lady newsreader who likes the rising tone at the end of a phrase, particularly if something unusual is involved, such as "there was ten thousand of them", as if she means "what do you think of that, children?". Then she mumbles if she doesn't think it's an interesting topic.

But then she works for the 'Beebcee', and talks of 'party sectrees' and 'confrences' and 'presdents', and of places like 'Norn Eyeland'.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline chasg

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #58 on: November 11, 2013, 11:49:15 »
Yeah, innit.

John38

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Re: Local accents - do they still exist?
« Reply #57 on: November 11, 2013, 11:20:48 »
English examples of the high rising tone exist in the UK in both native accents of Birmingham and County Durham.

Current academic research uses the term 'High Rising Tone' as its standard. The plotting of the Isogloss pin points the origins in Sydney although California ( & the West Coast in General) broadcast it coast to coast and hence the world. Certainly the US/California claim it.

During the academic paper I wrote on the subject, much use of Concordance interrogation all existing Language  Corpora was involved.

If I wasn't too lazy to go outside to my storage area I would give you all the academic references  :)

 

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