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Author Topic: Shipwrights  (Read 15023 times)

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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2013, 15:02:07 »
Podger or Spudding Spike!! Thanks grandarog, I`ve often wondered what it was. I have heard the Police refer to the `instrument` they use to break down doors as a `podger`, or was it `posher`?  At one time I had a complete set of enormous augers complete with handle, some were a few feet long, unfortunately they were too far`gone` and more or less disintegrating so they had to go.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2013, 07:03:47 »
The spanner is commonly known as a Podger or Spudding Spike. Used extensively in engineering and construction jobs to align holes in mating surfaces. Scaffolders use a slightly different version which has a swiveling socket spanner on the end. I gave 19 and 24 mm ones  my to my son in law when I retired. I think I have still got an antique 5/8th Whitworth heavy iron one somewhere. :)

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2013, 19:54:29 »
That sounds like a fish-plate spanner as used on railways. It has a long tapered handle that you slip through the bolt holes, as you CDP have said, to line up the plates.

S4.
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Offline CDP

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2013, 19:47:17 »
 A shipwright friend of mine said shipwrights worked in wood and metal and glass and rubber etc., etc., almost like an odd job man.
When he was in the R.N. and at sea he was even told to make some photograph frames for the Captain's wife
The long spiky tool mentioned in No. 3 thread was used to line up two metal plates to put a bolt through and the spannner end was to tighten the bolts after it was lined up. When I worked in the Dockyard,  Roy? Beard a fitter, used his finger to line up two plates and lost the tip of his finger.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline scintilla

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2013, 09:58:52 »
I'm no expert at all on shipwrights, but when tracing my family history I found an ancestor who worked as a shipwright at Chatham Dockyard who stated on the 1911 census that his occupation was "Shipwright - Iron and Wood". So I assumed they worked in both materials.

petermilly

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 09:46:11 »
I seem to remember being told in the late 60s that each group of apprentice shipwrights at some stage had to make a ships lifeboat.  :)
P

Offline Joedest

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2013, 09:24:41 »
My brother was a shipwright based in the Mast House,  I know he worked in wood
he made me an attaché case in wood. There were also  " Dilutee" shipwrights, men
 usually working as carpenters on buildings, sent to the dockyard for the duration
of the war. However how do you account for the state of their overalls if they only
worked in nice clean wood. My brother is on the left in the picture. 1953.


Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2013, 18:25:32 »
Looks like that 'spanner' needs a handle like the gouge. Very nice tools there Bryn.  :)

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Offline CDP

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The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 14:27:58 »
A few more tools, although I`m not sure about the peculiar looking spanner.


Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 14:08:05 »
My father-in-law was a shipwright in Chatham Dockyard during WWII. I still have his toolbox and some of his tools, including a wicked looking Adze which 2`6" long.




Offline mmitch

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Re: Shipwrights
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 10:29:25 »
Shipwrights worked in wood. A neighbour did his apprenticeship at Chatham Dockyard. My Great grandfather was one too, at a boatyard in Sussex.
mmitch.

Offline Joedest

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Shipwrights
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 09:30:02 »
Shipwrights, were they woodworkers or metal workers, maybe a bit of both?
Do you know any of these from 1953?







 

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