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Author Topic: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town  (Read 10682 times)

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Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2018, 18:11:02 »
The first steps towards reinstating the Delf Stream in Sandwich have been made.

Pipeline specialists from water firm On Site have this week conducted a preliminary survey of the ancient man-made stream using CCTV cameras.

The aim to is establish the extent of work required to get the stream - which carried water for hundreds of years into Sandwich - running again.

Work on the stream has begun. But already silt and the build up of debris lining the waterway has caused complications.

Cllr John Bragg, chairman of the newly set up Delf Stream working group, said: "They've done the first part of the inspection which has proved it's going to be more difficult because the Delf is in a very poor state.

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"There is so much silt and a layer of leaf mould from all the leaves that have fallen over the years. They've been using a sort of sledge with a camera on it to get through.

Cllr John Bragg
"The entry of water to the River Stour at Brewery Sluice also isn't working properly. Once this is operational again it will make it easier."

Sandwich Town Council is funding the survey work estimated to cost around £2,500.

A further £7,500 for further exploratory work has been set aside in next year's budget.

Cllr Richard Daw met with the specialists as they conducted their work from Delf House through to the junction of Galliard Street and New Street on Monday.

He said: "The survey thus far has shown where various manholes are in the system and photos have been taken of the pipe work at those points."

The medieval channel was created in the 13th century, believed to be to supply St. Bartholomew’s Hospital with water.

Its source was the fenland at Brooklands near Finglesham and the hamlet of Ham which acted as an undrained reservoir that kept the water flowing into Sandwich.

Once the scale of work required has been identified, councillors say they will consider applying for funding to complete the project.

If the stream is fully restored, they believe it will compliment Sandwich's tourism offer with one idea being to create a Delf walk, leading people to the source.

Cllr Bragg said: "It would be very historical and we think a lot of people would be excited to see it."

The full results of the survey and photographs are expected in the coming weeks.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2013, 08:20:15 »
I envy you philr as it's a great place! I remember working with a chap who's parents kept the Greyhound pub about 40 years ago. I had a look on the Web about Ham Fen, which is a source of the North Stream, and saw that the beaver population there has expanded. This fen is to the left of the Deal to Sandwich main road. I understand the warden has to be contacted first to arrange a visit to the fen.

philr

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2013, 21:40:29 »
I am glad there is so much appreciation for Sandwich. It is my home town, my family being there since at least the 1800's. I always enjoy seeing photos of old Sandwich, both from family collections and from other sources.
Many years ago Sandwich had a huge amount of public houses, I had heard the more than any other town but I am not certain of that claim. Somewhere my dad, who has lived in the same road for nearly 81 years, has a list of these pubs!

The building with the pipe coming out into the stream in the photo used to be the Delf Coachworks garage which at one time was owned by Charlie Oliver who lived across the road from me. I can still remember the garage smell when walking by!

Offline davpott

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2013, 21:07:21 »
The latest thinking on the Delf has been outlined in the only serious academic study of this once very important town and port in ‘Sandwich, The completest medieval town in England’ , Clarke, Pearson, Mate, Parfitt. (English Heritage, 2010)pp37-38.

Its original sources were a number of springs around the Lydden Valley. It provided the town with its main supply of freshwater. It is first mentioned as a boundary in documents written in the mid- 1100s which may suggest an earlier origin.

It originally entered the sea/Watsum to the east of Sandwich. A channel called Pinnock Wall was excavated to supply the Delf from Roaring Gutter…..

…..”Nevertheless, it may be that the urban stretch of the Delf at Sandwich and its diversion from its source were instigated by Christ Church Priory……the first reference to the Delf is in a Canterbury Cathedral Document dating from the time of Prior Wilbert. He was responsible for the highly elaborate water system in the Canterbury Cathedral claustral buildings, suggesting Canterbury had sophisticated water engineers by that period”. 

Offline TowerWill

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2013, 17:50:34 »
Yes, Sandwich is a lovely town. My first trip through the town was by bus for a visit to Richborough Port. This was when the nearby power station was being built. A later trip over there was by a steam loco hauled train. That stunk through Guston Tunnel too! I knew I'd seen a hand pump in Sandwich. It might have been that one in No-Name-Street when we were eating fish and chips outside.There are some nice pubs here but care is needed to avoid banging one's head on the low beams.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2013, 14:02:09 »
Sandwich is a lovely town to walk round - so much history.  Some good pubs and eating places too.  I read that Sandwich has the greatest number of listed buildings per head of population in the UK.

JW

petermilly

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2013, 13:53:45 »
Just came upon this........
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WME16N_Hand_Water_Pump_No_Name_Street_Sandwich_Kent_UK
Must visit Sandwich sometime looks interesting  :)


petermilly

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2013, 13:02:27 »
Not much help I'm afraid, but the 'Delf' is mentioned in:
The Kentish Stour by Robert H Goodsall page 208
Can`t work out the date but "The common sergeant had a number of important duties to carry out.......... He had to patrol the Delf-the artificial conduit which ran through the town to supply it with water, to see that the washer women did not pollute it when rinsing clothes,.........

Offline TowerWill

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2013, 12:55:12 »
The Sandwich area was a favourite of mine too JW. I often cycled through the lanes from Dover to Deal, then along the cycle path on the main road to Sandwich. On the opposite side of the road to the "Coach and Horses", inn I'd take a farm track out to the Roaring Gutter. This is an interesting place with some long stretches of water and a small pumping station. Going via a footpath from Worth to Sandwich I'd cross the Delph on a little bridge and the stream would be on the left as the footpath entered Sandwich. An alternative route was not to go into Worth but cross over the Blue Pigeons railway crossing and follow the rough track that comes out on the toll road near the Sandwich Bay Bird Observatory. This track crosses the North Stream from which I think the Delph gets it's water. I'm going by my O.S. map here as I only know the tracks across the marshes.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2013, 12:21:04 »
I have also seen it spelled as 'Delft'.

S4.
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Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2013, 12:04:16 »
The Delph Stream running between houses plus a close up of what I think is a pipe connecting to a pump within the property.


Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2013, 10:00:41 »
Here's a small file image of the Horse Pond Sluice taken yesterday.  There's no pond nearby that I could see so wonder where it got it's name.

The sluice doesn't look like it's been opened for a very long time but the mechanism appears intact.

JW

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2013, 09:08:46 »
I was told many years ago that the Delph/Delf was called that after/by the Dutch workers who dug it. Until recently, the 1970's, it was navigable by canoe (one for Admiral D'Asgoine?) and was one of the few streams that did not dry during the summer of 1976. I was told this by a long term resident of the town who is sadly no longer with us.

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Offline JohnWalker

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Re: The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2013, 00:43:00 »
After typing the post above, I've just found this info - would still like any further info and map.

From the beginning of the 13th century Sandwich was supplied with water from a man-made channel called the Delf. It was probably originally constructed to supply St. Bartholomew's Hospital on the outskirts of Sandwich, and its maintenance was the responsibility of the town. The area called Brooklands, near Finglesham and Ham, was not drained so the fenland would act as a reservoir to supply water for the Delf (also known as the South Stream). The Delf, which ran from Roaring Gutter, operated successfully until 1820 when Brooklands was drained. This greatly restricted the water flow and, in 1825, led to the introduction of an innovative water management scheme devised by Henry Foord, which used inverted siphons to keep the South Stream at a sufficient gradient to flow into Sandwich. The Delf continued to supply Sandwich with water until 1899.
 
The Delf flows under the pavement in front of the 15th century Grade II listed residential property named 'Horse Pond Sluice'. The Sluice gate itself is sited alongside the front of the property. The hand operated sluice gate controlled water around the ancient Sandwich Town.

Offline JohnWalker

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The Delph/Delf Stream in Sandwich Town
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2013, 00:38:17 »
I've always been facinated by the Delph Stream that appear in culverts in numerous locations in Sandwich.  The water is very clear.  All I have managed to find out so far is that there are two spellings - Delf and Delph and it was probably the water supply for the town at one time.  I have noticed a cast iron pipe coming from the side of one of the houses and going into the stream.  It's about the diameter of the feeder pipes that village pumps had.

In Delf Street there is a cast iron sluice with a notice on the wall that says Horse Pond Sluice.  The stream appears to go into a tunnel on the other side of the sluice gate.

Would appreciate some further info on any of the above.  A map of the Delph Stream would be excellent.

JohnWalker

 

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