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Author Topic: HMS Achille (1798 - 1865)  (Read 7448 times)

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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: HMS Achille (1798 - 1865)
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2013, 20:08:43 »
I think that the problem with preserving ships is the huge cost involved. A traction engine, roller, steam waggon or rail loco can be kept in a shed of reasonable proportions. A ship though is a vast undertaking. You need a huge area for even a reasonably small ship like the Victory or the Gannet or Cavalier. They need constant maintenance or a big scale and unlike a rail loco how do you earn a reasonable up keep from visitors without charging a huge entry price? I love seeing old machinery saved, these sailing ships were very complex machines, but when the cost outweighs the benefit then as sad as it is it must go.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Achille (1798 - 1865)
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2013, 19:16:00 »
Great read Bilgerat. Makes you think, after all that history, money and spent lives...... sold for 1000.

Thanks. If you adjust the costings into todays money, HMS Achille cost a total of 1,018,685 to build (assuming that one 1 from 1798 is worth 18 today).

When sold to be broken up, 1000 in 1865 pounds would be worth 14,290 today.

These figures are calculated using an inflation calculator found here: http://www.davemanuel.com/inflation-calculator.php?. This is an American calculator, but there's no reason to suppose figures in UK pounds would be any different.

We British have never really been sentimental about preserving old ships. This is true, even today. One only has to look at the state of HMS Plymouth, the last surviving surface vessel from the Falklands War. In 1949, the Royal Navy towed the former HMS Implacable out into the Channel and blew her up. This ship was originally the French 74 gun ship Douguay-Trouin, the only remaining 74 gun ship in the world and the only French survivor of the Battle of Trafalgar.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

petermilly

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Re: HMS Achille (1798 - 1865)
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2013, 10:02:08 »
Great read Bilgerat. Makes you think, after all that history, money and spent lives...... sold for 1000.

Offline Bilgerat

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HMS Achille (1798 - 1865)
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2013, 23:29:26 »
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

 

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