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Author Topic: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820  (Read 3293 times)

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Offline smiler

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Re: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013, 12:06:38 »
Nice find petermilly, but not the best speaker I've ever heard  :)

petermilly

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Re: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2013, 11:47:32 »
Could this be the real box?  :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jdue2DqxFkw


merc

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Re: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2013, 11:04:18 »
In a book about Jezreels Tower at Gillingham Library I'm sure it mentions a group of Joanna Southcott followers on the Lines.

Offline smiler

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Re: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2013, 06:46:58 »
KENT 1800-1899 By Bob Ogley

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2013, 21:31:08 »
What publication was that in smiler?
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Brompton History Research Group
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Offline smiler

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Waiting for miracle on The Lines Gillingham 1820
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2013, 18:15:35 »
Some time before the religious visionary, Joanna Southcott, died in 1814 she predicted a date on which her loyal followers would be taken up bodily to heaven. That date was yesterday and hundreds gathered on The Lines, Gillingham waiting for the miracle. It never happened.

Uneducated and even illiterate Joanna spent her early days in domestic service but in 1792 she began to claim the gift of prophecy and her revelations attracted many followers.She moved to Southwark after the publication of her first book "The Strange Effects of Faith" and opened a chapel where her predictions attracted many adherents. Later she announced that, as the woman in Revelation 12, she would be the mother of the coming Messiah.

Joanna took to her bed and six of the nine doctors who examined her said her symptoms would indicate pregnancy in a younger woman. This was the news that thrilled her followers who began costly preparations for the birth of the spiritual man they called "the second Shiloh".

In November 1814 Joanna Southcott died of a brain disease, aged 64. Her followers continued to study the 65 tracts and books of her writings and the sect never completely died out. She left a locked box with instructions that it be opened only in the event of a national crisis.

 

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