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Author Topic: Storm - July, 1853  (Read 3886 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2013, 15:35:05 »
Having checked, the date of the newspaper was Tuesday 12 July 1853, making the date of the storm 7th July 1853.
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2013, 10:06:10 »
Smiffy do you know the date of this storm. Oops had failed to see the subject title with date, senior moment yet again. :)
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2013, 09:06:58 »
Smiffy do you know the date of this storm. Oops had failed to see the subject title with date, senior moment yet again. :)
Your not alone, Rochester-bred - the joys of becoming old?

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 08:34:43 »
Smiffy do you know the date of this storm. Oops had failed to see the subject title with date, senior moment yet again. :)
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Offline smiffy

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2013, 16:36:30 »
South Eastern Gazette.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2013, 15:39:58 »
What is the source for that story smiffy?  Newspaper report?
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Offline smiffy

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Storm - July, 1853
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2013, 14:39:50 »
VIOLENT STORM.  The neighbourhood of Rochester and Chatham was visited on Thursday night last, with one of the most terrific storms of rain, thunder and lightning, that has been experienced for several years past. The weather throughout the day had been intensely hot, and the wind, which all day had been blowing from the East, towards evening quickly shifted to the South, and as night approached dark masses of clouds were seen gathering from all parts of the horizon portending a violent convulsion of the elements. Flashes of lightning were observed in the West after sundown, and towards midnight the storm commenced in earnest, the rain falling in torrents, more resembling spouts of water, than rain-drops. Peal after peal of thunder followed each other in rapid succession, the most distant objects the while being observable at intervals, owing to the extremely vivid flashes of lightning, which illumined the heavens for miles round. The storm, having spent its fury, abated for about half-an-hour, after which it recommenced  more furiously than before. Between twelve and one o'clock the lightning struck the house of Mrs. Crozier, 7, Mansion row, Brompton, which it set on fire. The electric fluid entered the house through the roof of the top bed-room, in which a boy ten years of age was asleep, with a younger sister, on an iron bedstead; it struck the pillow close to the head of the boy, who miracuiousiy escaped with a slight singeing of the hair and partial deafness on that side. It then, after setting fire to the bed clothes and furniture, the latter of which was completely destroyed, passed round the room, and being attracted by the copper bell wires, was carried by them through the house, leaving in its progress marks as if the walls had been fired in those parts. The wires of the bells are twisted and broken, and in many parts fused as if subjected to intense heat. Mrs. Crozier, who was the only grown up person in the house at the time, by great exertion extinguished the flames, though several articles are wholly destroyed. The adjoining house, occupied by Mr. Hope, and also that by Mr. Skillett, suffered in a similar manner, though not to so great an extent. The lightning also struck and threw down a wall at Gillingham, on the premises of Mr. Green, market gardener, the debris being hurled to a considerable distance.

 

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