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Author Topic: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 650. Worth  (Read 2626 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 650. Worth
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2013, 21:16:55 »
These sites can be viewed on English Heritages Pastscape on the net.  You can also see Colin Dodinson's book called 'Fields of Deception'.  Because something is on Pastscape does not mean it is 100%.

If anyone has any corrections or photos of surviving buildings or earthworks, please post them.
It`s what the Forum is for :)
Just four more decoys to go.
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

Offline JohnG

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Re: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 650. Worth
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2013, 20:01:49 »
These sites can be viewed on English Heritages Pastscape on the net.  You can also see Colin Dodinson's book called 'Fields of Deception'.  Because something is on Pastscape does not mean it is 100%.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 650. Worth
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2013, 19:39:15 »
A Second World War bombing decoy site at Worth. It was built as part of the Naval Coast decoys for Dover Command to deflect enemy bombing from a system of coastal loading points known as 'hards'. The decoys were commissioned as part of Operation Fortitude South in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. This was a 'QL' decoy, which was designed to simulate the sparse lighting and small cluster of buildings found at the landing craft 'hards'. The Naval Coast 'QL' decoys were constructed between April and May 1943 with the basic features of a 'QL', essentially the shelter and the fittings for the lights.
The electrical equipment was to be fitted at a date nearer to the invasion, which led the Naval Coast decoys to become known as Mobile 'QLs' (or 'MQLs'). Aerial photos from 1972 show that the site had been developed into a golf course and no features of the decoy survive. Further decoy sites for Dover Command were located at Camber Castle, Sussex, (Decoy 651) and Sandwich Flats.
http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1470218
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

 

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