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Author Topic: Eynsford Castle  (Read 3172 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Eynsford Castle
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2016, 21:58:08 »
I finally got round to visiting this one :)  Lots of roman tiles to be found, especially in the fireplace and in doorways.






































Offline TowerWill

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Re: Eynsford Castle
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2013, 07:28:01 »
Thankyou for the interesting photos cliveh!I can recall the station and a viaduct in the area and that's it.

Offline kyn

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Re: Eynsford Castle
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2013, 23:25:58 »
I visited Eynsford and totally missed the castle!  It is tucked away and not well signposted.  I need a return trip!

Offline cliveh

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Re: Eynsford Castle
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2013, 21:08:25 »
It's not well known busyglen and you'd never know it was there unless you were looking for it. It's tucked away behind Eynsford High Street.

cliveh

Offline busyglen

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Re: Eynsford Castle
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2013, 18:31:06 »
Thanks for this cliveh.  The photos are interesting, and I must confess that I have never heard of this castle!  Something definitely lacking in my history here!
A smile is a curve that straightens things out.

Offline cliveh

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Eynsford Castle
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2013, 18:13:50 »
Some info from English Heritage:

There was an earlier building on the site, but little is known about this structure, except that it was the focal point of a Saxon settlement. The impressive curtain wall was built between 1085 and 1087, probably by William de Eynsford I, a knight and sheriff of Kent. The defences were further strengthened in the late 11th or early 12th century and a hall and associated buildings were erected inside the castle walls. In 1261 Eynsford castle and estate were divided between the Kirkeby and Criol families, causing much dispute. The conflict reached a climax in 1312 when Nicholas de Criol and his supporters broke in and vandalised Eynsford Castle as a protest against Judge William Inge who had bought the castle from the Kirkeby family. After the vandalism the castle was abandoned. Eventually the castle passed into the ownership of the Hart Dyke family of nearby Lullingstone Castle and by the mid-18th century Eynsford Castle was used for stabling and the kennelling of hunting hounds.

Some photos from a visit this week:


cliveh

 

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