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Author Topic: Lost Sheerness Cemetery  (Read 4680 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2015, 21:06:31 »
~snip~.......and this portion, before its enclosure by the Government (when the surface was raised 5 of 6 ft.), must have been a burial ground, for when the excavation had proceeded about 13 ft. below the present surface, a tombstone was brought to light, and a few feet further down the remains of eight human bodies were disinterred. These remains were reinterred in consecrated ground. The stone bears the following inscription surmounted with a death's head and cross-bones carved into the stone: - "Here lies ye body of Eliz. Morison, wife of Alex. Morison, who departed this life, November 15th, 1729, aged 49 years." This memento of a departed graveyard has been inserted into the plinth of the engine-house connected with the well and occupies a position almost immediately over the spot where it was discovered.   ~snip~

Could this be the lost cemetery? The tombstone is dated one year earlier than the earliest date given in CDP's list linked to in my original post, but I don't think this is a problem. The tombstone is probably the one seen by CDP.
Just to the north of the well is the Military Infant's School. where a large male skeleton was found when the foundations were being dug in 1864.

Offline kyn

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2013, 08:16:10 »
I was under the impression that was another Convict burial ground too.  Apart from these three I don't know of any other burial grounds here.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2013, 04:46:48 »
Hello Herb Collector.
At the time the steel works was built,I was working for the SEEB 33KV construction department.
During the excavations in and around the sub station area(roughly the site of the old garrison garages)we came across a number of coffins ,naturally the police became involved. we were told it was an old cemetery site,some mention was made regarding French POWs ,hope this helps?
 

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2013, 23:41:08 »
Thanks Kyn.
The Archway House burial ground was RN only, the convicts burial grounds can be ruled out which leaves burial ground I in the second of the 2 maps you posted.
CDP notes a headstone built into a wall of a Sheerness Dockyard building. http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=16007.0 This could have come from there.

Offline kyn

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2013, 09:49:40 »


"I" and "K".

Offline kyn

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Re: Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 09:40:46 »
One was lost at the site of the Moat and Ravelin (convict?), another was within the dockyard walls near to where Archway House is located I think, and a further convict burial ground was lost where the Moat was constructed around Townsend Fort area (where the steel mill now is).

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Lost Sheerness Cemetery
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2013, 23:07:20 »
In use 1730 to 1806.
CDP'S site gives details of around 900 burials. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~penney/hm dockyard church/main page.htm

The Rev. H. W. Millett, chaplain of the Dockyard, wrote in 1886, "For a hundred and twenty-four years, fifty-three in its first state, and seventy-one in its second, the (Dockyard) Chapel reared its head a conspicuous object above the surrounding buildings, and collected within its walls many thousands who have passed away, whose graves have long since been obliterated by works connected with the fortifications."

So where was the cemetery?
I think it must have been to the east or north-east of the road into the dockyard. Any ideas?

 

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