News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell  (Read 5256 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ewellboy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2015, 05:28:28 »
The red brick mill was always known as 'The Gas Mill' as it was powered by an internal combustion engine fuelled by town gas.  It had a huge single cylinder with a flywheel about 5 feet diameter.  It had 'random spark' ignition as the spark plug only fired when the flywheel slowed down.  It was housed in a strong mesh cage that was always locked.  The exhaust 'chuffed' out of an exhaust pipe outside the rear of the mill just out of reach from the roof of the air raid shelter to the left of the mill.  The characteristic 'chuff' could be heard a long way off so if the mill was working we always knew the way home when we were playing on the Minnis or Temple Hill.

Offline Ewellboy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2015, 04:48:53 »
The Mill C1990

Offline Ewellboy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2015, 04:27:03 »
I was born in Temple Ewell and from 1944 to 55 lived next to the mills so knew them well.
The water wheel was uncovered until about 1948 when a large frame covered in black corrugated iron was built over it.  Across the top was a series of spaced timbers about 6 x 2inches to let a deep flow pass over freely.
Before it was covered the local boys, when the wheel was still, would sit in it and fish over the side.  The brook, as locals always called it, was full of brown trout, below and above the wheel and in the pond next to Pennock's nursery.  When the men were building the cover some boys caught some trout and Mrs Hetty Dyer cooked them for the workmen's lunch.  In return the 6inch nails in two of the top timbers were shortened so that the boys could open a trap door and climb down the wheel spokes and continue to fish.  This worked well until someone 'grassed' and the planks were nailed down firmly.  We found out the first day I was considered old enough and taken to fish.
We didn't lose much as soon afterwards the pond and brook dried up in the summer and all the fish died.
Whoever did the engineering took a small drive shaft to a large beam just inside the doors of the mill and made a small articulated mannequin with hands attached to a small wheel who seemed to be driving the mill.  Bob Chapman, Mr Alf Stanley's miller would open the lower half-door so that small children could watch the man driving the mill.  He would always kid them that he put a sixpence in its pocket every Friday and bought him a new set of yellow shirt and red trousers each Christmas.
When the lovely old mill was vandalised for a dwelling the cover was taken off and the wheel covered in cement.  I will attach a photo of the wheel from about 1990.  It was sent to me as a greetings card so I cannot attribute it but I think it makes clear that the front section of the wheel is no longer there.

Offline kms

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
  • Appreciation 13
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2013, 21:26:36 »
Difficult to say... but certainly looks like it.  Shame, it wasn't hurting anyone.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 21:08:48 »
Yes it has!

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 21:06:43 »
I think so, although my pictures don't show it clearly.  I did think it was gone when I visited and would assume that you would see it clearly from the road.

Offline kms

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
  • Appreciation 13
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 20:49:45 »
Thank you for the added information :)

I surveyed and recorded what was left in the late 80s.  Has the wheel gone?

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 20:37:41 »
Thank you for the added information :)

Offline kms

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
  • Appreciation 13
Re: Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 20:35:39 »
Was a working mill until about 1967, and was sadly house converted... machinery dispersed for tables inside.  It was very rare in that it was 'overdrift', in that the millstones were driven from a spur wheel above them.  The waterwheel is probably completely knackered now.  It was made by Holmans of Canterbury in 1914, and encased in concrete during conversion to stop it turning.  First corn mill on this splinter of the Dour.

Your picture kyn suggests what is left of the wheel has been taken away.  It was still there about 2010...

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7407
  • Appreciation 419
    • Sheppey History
Stanley’s Mill, Temple Ewell
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2013, 22:27:36 »
This water mill was built in 1790, although its origins are from Saxon times.  A steam mill was built alongside it in 1870, both of which still stand although have not been used as mills since the 1960’s.












 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines