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Author Topic: St. Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury  (Read 2151 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: St. Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2016, 20:30:00 »
Hi, it is a fantastic site!  A lot bigger than I was expecting and very little known it seems!  It is pretty much across the road from Burgate near the Cathedral.

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: St. Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2016, 19:26:30 »
Kyn. That's one helluva building- or was! Afraid I'd never heard of it let alone seen it. Where abouts" outside the walls" is it please?

Offline kyn

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Re: St. Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2016, 18:08:56 »


The abbey was founded by St. Augustine in around 598; it is one of the oldest monastic sites in the country and was built to mark the success of the evangelical mission ordered by Pope Gregory to reintroduce Christianity to the south of England after the Romans initially brought it to the country.

The abbey was designed to be the burial place for the local Kings and Archbishops, burials were not allowed within the city walls.

After the Norman Conquest it began to run as a Benedictine Abbey until 1538 when Henry VIII suppressed it as part of the dissolution of monasteries.  After this period ownership fell to the Crown and Henry built a palace here for his wife, and as a resting place whilst traveling in the area.

Cemetery gatehouse


Looking across the nave to the remains of the palace (red brick addition)









Looking up the nave






The crypt of Wulfrics Rotunda built to join two previous church together (1050).


Looking back down the nave


One of many side chapels


Decorative detail remaining




The crypt




Side chapel


Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary this chapel was used for the singing of Mass for nearly 200 years.  You can still see its wall-painting design of heraldic lions in circles.  There are also surviving floor tiles relaid here from elsewhere in the church.














Another side chapel












The Cloisters












This area contained the burial sites of several of the early archbishops


St Pancras chapel, the Anglo-Saxon parts of the church can be seen, mostly recognised by the reuse of Roman bricks. 


















Standing stone of unknown origin



Offline kyn

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St. Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2013, 09:20:27 »
An old engraving.

 

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