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Author Topic: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"  (Read 10434 times)

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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2013, 15:19:20 »
Many thanks conan, granderog and aveling.

Here is a photo of Jimmy Toms, albeit a poor one, also one of his daughter Mabel who married George Feint.


Offline aveling

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2013, 09:13:04 »
Bryn

You mention that the 'Sidwell' was owned by the firm of JD Drake who went out of business in 1912 shortly before all the land around was purchased by Edward Lloyd Ltd for the Ridham Dock and Tramway. JD Drake's brickyard was situated near the SKLR Kemsley Down Station and there are a few remnants of the yard visible today. The brick ponds just above the SKLR station are now the settlement ponds for the water used in the paper mill. Their dock is still evident outside the back gate of the SKLR.

Liz

Offline grandarog

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2013, 15:37:05 »
Bryn here`s a bit about your lot and barges. :)

From George Feints memories.
The first sailing barge he worked on was the locally owned Gleaner, which worked regularly to Beaumont Cut. later, he transferred to the barge Valentine, owned by Green at Brantham. Some of Smeed Dean's barges also worked to Beaumont Quay and Jimmy Toms, skipper of the Mercy, persuaded George that he had a better future with the Kent firm and he took George on as mate of the Mercy. George lodged with his skipper when ashore, and later married Jimmy's second daughter Mabel.
After serving in the First World War, George returned to Sittingbourne and became skipper of local barges Fanny, Bessier (1923-1929, Smeed Dean), Herbert Gordon (1929-1933, George Andrews, Sittingbourne), Castanet and Bankside (auxilaries of Francis & Gilders).

Source Frank Wilmott's site :-  http://www.thamesbarge.org.uk/barges/Willmott.html

Offline conan

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2013, 13:46:37 »
                                                           
I found the book by Bob Childs, Rochester Sailing Barges of The Victorian Era, of all places at Chatham militria show at the dockyard, in a box with a load of other books priced at 3.50..????

Ross

Thanks for your reply Ross! Does the book have a photo of the "Mercy"? My Great Uncle Jimmy Toms was it`s skipper.  At some time he `took on` George Feint (who I believe became well known for racing barges/yachts) as his mate and George eventually married one of Uncle Jim`s daughters. He and Bill Kennett (Sidwell) were friends.

Found this about the 'Mercy'



To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2013, 14:55:25 »
                                                           
I found the book by Bob Childs, Rochester Sailing Barges of The Victorian Era, of all places at Chatham militria show at the dockyard, in a box with a load of other books priced at 3.50..????

Ross

Thanks for your reply Ross! Does the book have a photo of the "Mercy"? My Great Uncle Jimmy Toms was it`s skipper.  At some time he `took on` George Feint (who I believe became well known for racing barges/yachts) as his mate and George eventually married one of Uncle Jim`s daughters. He and Bill Kennett (Sidwell) were friends.

Ross

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2013, 13:17:17 »
A little more information about the sailing barge "Sidwell". Sometime after the second world war, Sidwell was just one of many barges that were converted into a yacht barge by the Whitewall Boat, Barge and Yacht Co. Ltd. of Hoo, Medway.
                                                           
I found the book by Bob Childs, Rochester Sailing Barges of The Victorian Era, of all places at Chatham militria show at the dockyard, in a box with a load of other books priced at 3.50..????

Ross

seafordpete

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2011, 19:14:37 »
No problem, on photobucket just copy the IMG address under or near the photo not the website

Offline mikeb

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2011, 19:05:08 »
seafordpete - thanks for un-scrambling my photo!

Minsterboy

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2011, 17:12:13 »
When I was a stevedore in Sheerness Docks, the Mooring Parties always used thin lines with Turks Heads on the end to make contact with the incoming vessel and so that its mooring lines and springs could be pulled ashore.
They can leave a nasty bump on the head if you happen to walk into the path of one as I have done in the past.

seafordpete

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2011, 16:52:57 »
The ball one is also known as a "monkeys fist" a Turks head is a decorative knot normally used to finish off ropework or a tiller

Offline delboy

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2011, 16:45:56 »
 Hi Bryn Clinch, we used to have those knots on the end of our heaving lines at the Western Docks to give the line a bit of weight when thrown out to the ships. The French sometimes put a small bag of lead shot in their knots to make them go further,delboy

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2011, 16:04:31 »
What a great forum this is! After failing to find a photo of the Sidwell, two have turned up. One by seafordpete on behalf of mikeb, who pipped me at the post, as I was about to post the same one which arrived by private email yesterday from a lady who must be a KFH member, or at least had read my post regarding the Sidwell.
I`m sure there is someone in the bow which must have been the skipper, my `Uncle` Bill Kennett as the date on the photo seems about right.
When I was a lad, Bill tied me a knot with thick rope which he called a`Turks Head`. The knot was about twice the size of a tennis ball, perfectly round and was on the end of about 2 feet of rope. I lost it trying to knock down conkers from a tree in Sittingbourne Rec. I`ve since been told that this wasn`t a Turks Head. Perhaps somebody on the Forum may know what it was. Somewhere I posted a photo of a phonograph which belonged to Bill.
The photo is of Bill Kennett (right) and his Mate, Alf Mills. He appears to be very stern on the photo but, in fact, was quite the opposite and  a perfect gentleman. I think the picture is from one of Allan Cordell`s books. Hopefully I haven`t broken any laws by posting it. Perhaps admin will delete it if I have.
Thanks to all!








Offline mmitch

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2011, 10:21:49 »
I have (in the past) borrowed this book from the Kent library.
It has two photos of my Great grandfather's barge the 'Duplicate'
in it.
mmitch.

seafordpete

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2011, 09:58:53 »
mikebs photo

Offline mikeb

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Re: Sailing Barge "Sidwell"
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2011, 09:38:27 »

 

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