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Author Topic: Sheerness Robbery 1974  (Read 34014 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #42 on: July 07, 2015, 14:48:02 »
Statement of:  Owen Edwin Facey
Age: Over 21
Occupation:  Senior Scientific Officer.
Address:  The Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory, 109 Lambeth Road, London. SE1 7LP

This statement (consisting of 2 pages each signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that if it is tendered in evidence I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 12th day of March, 1975.
Signed: O.E. Facey.


“On 16th January, 1975 my colleague Mr. L. Morse, and I took joint possession of item DC/A which was in a sealed bag.  I have examined this in conjunction with the control items detailed in my previous statement.

Leather Coat.
The following materials which are similar to the control items were found on this coat:-
Alum crystals comparing with those in the ‘ballast from safe’.
A fragment of glass comparing with the glass making the light bulb.
Types B and C paints comparing with that in the ‘ballast from safe’.

Conclusion
The coat has been in contact with material that almost certainly came originally from the ‘safe’ and also has glass on it which could have come from the shattered light bulb.
After examination I signed the label.”

Signed O.E. Facey.



Statement of:  Walter Somerville, M.D., F.R.C.P.
Age: Over 21 years
Occupation:  Consultant Physician to Dept. of Cardiology.
Address:  -

This statement (consisting of 1 page each signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that if it is tendered in evidence I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 29th day of April, 1975.
Signed: Walter Somerville

“I have seen the statements made by Doctor John Benjamin Harse, in relation to the post mortem examination of Eric Nicholls.”

(Signed) Walter Somerville



Statement of:  Dr. John B. Harse M.B., M.R.C.S., D.M.J. (Path)
Age: Over 21 years
Occupation:  Lecturer in Forensic Medicine.
Address:  Dept. of Forensic Medicine, The London Hospital Medical College, Turner Street, London. E1 2AD.
Telephone: 01-247-5454. Ext. 360.

This statement (consisting of 1 page each signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that if it is tendered in evidence I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 30th day of April, 1975.
Signed: John B. Harse.

Name: Derek Nicholls
Mortuary: Chatham – 12.12.74.
“At the request of Detective Chief Inspector Spencer of the Kent County Constabulary, I read copies of statements written by Walter Summerville M.D., F.R.C.P.
I am in agreement with his opinion that death did result from a diseased heart and that the most likely sequence of events was a combination of injury inflicted on Mr. Nichols and his struggles to release himself from his bonds and emotions and/or stress out of sheer fright that were inflicted on him 24 hours or so prior to his death.
As previously written in my statements there was adequate evidence at post mortem and at microscopic examination of the tissues to substantiate a diagnosis of an acute heart attack (myocardial infarction).  The Patho-physiological processes  (no further document).



Schedule 1
Charges

Both Defendants
On the 12th day of December, 1974, at Sheerness in the County of Kent, murdered Eric Percival Nicholls.
Against the Peace or Our Sovereign Lady the Queen, Her Crown and Dignity.

On the 11th day of December, 1974, at Sheerness in the County of Kent, did steal a safe containing £53 in cash, bottles of tablets, bottles of perfume, four watches, a ring, a number of foreign coins, correspondence, bank bools and personal papers, one pair of gold cuff links valued at £15 all belonging to Carol Lillyan Nicholls, and approximately £300 in cash belonging to Eric Percival Nicholls all valued together at approximately £613.00 and immediately before, and at the time of so doing and in order to do so, did use force on Eric Percival Nicholls.
Contrary to Section 8(1 of the Theft Act, 1968.

On the 11th day of December, 1074, at Sheerness in the County of Kent, did cause grievous bodily harm to Eric Percival Nicholls, with the intent to case grievous bodily harm.
Contrary to Section 18 of the Offences Against the Person Act, 1861.
 


Application for Bail

Take notice that an application for bail will be made to the Crown Court at Gravesend on Wednesday 14th May at 10.00 a.m.
Paul John Harris
Place of detention: Canterbury Prison – No. 315 798
Particulars of proceedings during which applicant was committed to custody: Murder and grevious bodily harm.
Details of any relevant previous applications for bail: 22/12/1974, 30/12/1974, 22/01/1974 Bail refused by Sheerness Magistrates Court because of applicants past record.
Grounds of application for bail: The applicant is pleading not guilty, and has a defence to all charges against him.
The applicants wife is only 19 and has two very young children.
The applicants proposed sureties are:
Leslie Harris, 52 Second Avenue, Sheerness, Sheppey, Kent
Albert Harris, 71 Maple Street, Sheerness, Sheppey, Kent.



Gravesend Crown Court
Wednesday 14th May 1975
(Mr. Justice Streeter)

The Queen
- Against –
Paul John Harris
Brief on Bail Application

Counsel is sent herewith:-
1.   Notice of Application for Bail.


Observations
Counsel has already received the junior brief for the Prosecution in this case. 
As can be seen from enclosure 1. above, Paul John Harris is applying for Bail, and Counsel is instructed to attend at Gravesend Crown Court on Wednesday 14th May 1975 at 10.00 a.m. to oppose the application.
Bail has previously been refused by Sheerness Magistrates because of the seriousness of the charge and the applicants past record.
Detective Chief Inspector Spencer has been requested to attend the application and instruct Counsel as to any Police objections to the granting of bail.



Observations

Counsel will please give special attention to the medical evidence, the charges, and the evidence generally.

Counsel will notice that the deceased man had a badly diseased heart as referred to by the Pathologists and that Doctor Harse could not give a cause of death until this organ had been further examined.  Doctor Somerville’s evidence assists the view that the death was attributable to the incident, hence the murder charges.  There may well be legal argument as to whether the incident did in fact cause the death.

As to who was responsible for the incident, be it Murder of Burglary, the case against Roderick Harris seems stronger on both matters but Counsel may feel that the evidence in respect of Paul re the murder is not strong as no firm evidence has come to light putting him inside the building at the material time.  Paul does say that he was outside the premises and received the safe from Roderick and carried it alone.  The evidence would indicate that one man could not carry the safe in the particular circumstances and that Roderick was assisted by another person in the house.

Paul mentions Northover as being that person, but this cannot be relied upon since the witness scot is firm in his evidence that Northover did not leave his home that night, other than seeing the 3rd man go into the building with Roderick, Paul never saw him leave.  That person was not at the share out at Paul’s home.

Paul has changed his story several times and is obviously lying to save his own skin from a murder rap.

It is difficult to see what the evidence of an alibi as respects Paul can be, but his defence Solicitor have said that notice of an alibi will be given.  This was said at the Committal proceedings.

The Committal charge of G.B. Harm was preferred in case the evidence as to cause of death falls flat.

Counsel is asked to advise fully on the evidence in this case and to say whether any evidence which is not at present in the case should be obtained.

Counsel is also asked to say what names and addresses, if any, of prosecution witnesses, not called for the Crown should be given to the defence.

Binding Overs

This may give an indication of how the defence will run the case.  Roderick Harris had the following witnesses absolutely bound to attend the trial vis Michael Nicholls, Hine, Tilling, Uppal, Prasad, Spencer, Harse, and Somerville.  For Paul Harris, the following witnesses were absolutely bound vis S. Northover, S. Scott, Middis, Bolaris, Marsh, and Spencer.

The forensic evidence is not yet to hand and this will be sent to Counsel as soon as it is received.  This is not likely to give any firm indication that Paul was ever inside the house.  Paul denied knowledge of the scarf which was recovered from inside the house.



Director of Public Prosecutions
Homicide Act, 1957
Particulars of Indictment for Murder

1.   Court of trial: Maidstone C.C.
2.   Name of the accused: Roderick Harris and Paul Harris
3.   Was accused’s fitness to plead raised? No
4.   Were any of the following issues raised, and, if so, by whom?
(a)   Provocation:
(b)   Diminished responsibility:
(c)   Suicide pact:
(d)   No intent to kill (or do G.B.H.): Defence. Accepted by Crown
(e)   Insanity within M’Naghten rules
5.   Verdict (and rider if any): R. Harris pleaded to Manslaughter – accepted.  P. Harris Not guilty to murder of manslaughter – accepted.
(i)   If Manslaughter, verdict was based on: No intent
6.   Sentence or Oder: R. Harris – 7 years c/1, 4 years conc c/2.  P. Harris c/2-3 years (Theft).

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #41 on: December 19, 2013, 17:13:05 »
Statement of:   Earl Rodney Spencer
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Inspector.
Address:   Police Station, Canterbury.

This statement (consisting of two pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 5th day of March, 1975.

“At 12.05 hours on Wednesday 5th March, 1975, in company with Detective Sergeant Marsh I saw Stanley David Northover at Sheerness Police Station.

I showed him the leather coat (exhibit DC/A) and said, ‘Is this your coat?’

Northover examined the coat and said, ‘No, I’m sure it’s not mine.

I said, ‘An allegation has been made that it was in your Dormobile van when you moved Paul Harris from strode Crescent to Rushenden.

Northover said, ‘I moved him but I didn’t have that coat in there.’

I said, ‘This coat has a connection with the offences committed at the Brewery Tap and the allegation is that you were wearing the coat that night.’

Northover said, ‘No way.’

I asked him to try on the coat, which he did, I noticed that it was too small and too tight for him. 

Northover said, ‘No I haven’t had this coat before.’

I said, ‘Have you seen Paul Harris since his last arrest?’

Northover said, ‘No I haven’t seen him at all.  I don’t even know where he is.  I know Rod is at Canterbury.’

I said,’ Have you caused a message to be sent to Paul telling him to keep his mouth shut?’

Northover said, ‘No I have not.’

I said, ‘Have you caused him to be threatened?’

Northover said, ‘No I have no reason to.  It is just a pity he is saying the things he is and causing me a lot of aggravation.  I said when I was first seen and asked about him that I thought he was a nut case.  Not in a funny way but just a nutter.”



Statement of:   Owen Edwin Facey
Age:   Over 21
Occupation:   Senior Scientific Officer
Address:   The Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory, 109 Lambeth Road, London, SW1 7LF.

This statement (consisting of 6 pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 11th day of March, 1975.

“On the 19th December, 1974, my colleague, Mr. L. Morse and I took possession of items MBG/11, 16, and 17, MBG/27. IT/C to G, NAB/A to C, G to I, N and P, DAMW/A and ERS/F.  On the same day I took possession of items MGB/5 to 10, MGB/18 and FBM/A and B.  Each of these items was individually wrapped and sealed.  I have examined there.

CONTROL ITEMS
Sheet of metal labelled ‘Safe’
There is a multilayer paint on the metal which has a layer structure of green topcoat over white over grey.  I shall refer to this as type A paint.  In places the surface of the paint and metal have been damaged by forcing an implement across it.
Loose in the sealed bag were fragments of a single layer red paint which was different from any of the paint on the metal sheet.

Debris labelled ‘Ballast from Safe’
Part of the debris consisted of paint flakes and crystals of alum.  The majority of paint flakes have a green topcoat similar to that on the metal sheet labelled ‘Safe’ (FBM/A), but the layers under this topcoat can vary in number and colour.
Besides type A layer structure there was:-
Green/fawn/off-white (type B)
Green/white/brown (type C)

Debris labelled ‘Safe Ballast’
The paint and alum in this debris were similar to that in the previous item (MGB/27).

Paint labelled ‘Door to Office’
This sample of multilayer paint has a white topcoat.

Paint labelled ‘Door to Office’
The paint in this item is extremely variable.  There are two topcoats, one green and the other yellow, and under each topcoat there can be a variety of lower layers.  One sequence was:-
Green/green/brown/brown/dark brown/brown/dark brown/greenish black/off-white (type D)
In some flakes the brown fourth later was missing; I shall call this type E.

Paint labelled ‘Toilet Door’
A sample of multilayer paint with a blue topcoat.

Paint labelled ‘Window’
This multilayer paint has a white topcoat.

Soap Flakes
A quantity of translucent soap flakes.

Shattered Light Bulb
The glass used to make the bulb is a relatively uncommon type.

Items Labelled ‘R. Harris’
Coat
Left glove
Right Glove
Combat Jacket
I was unable to find anything on these items that matched the controls.

Left glove
Right Glove
A ten layer paint flake with a green topcoat was found inside the right glove.  This visually matched type D paint labelled ‘Door to Office’ (MBG/6).  Also present on the right glove were three paint flakes with a green topcoat over green over brown layers which also visually match the first three layers of type D paint.

Left Boot
Right Boot
A five layer paint flake with a green topcoat was found on the left boot.  This visually corresponds to the first five layers of type E paint (MBG/6).

Blue Jeans
Crystals of alum were found in the left pocket of these jeans.

Flying Jacket
Crystals of alum were found on the outer surface and the left and right pockets of this jacket.  In addition flakes of green over white paint, visually the same as the top two layers of type A and C paint labelled ‘safe’ were found in the right pocket.  In the left pocket there were two types of three layer paint which match both types B and C paint labelled ‘safe’.

Items labelled ‘P. Harris’.
I was unable to find any material that matched the control items on these trousers.

Jacket
Jumper

A flake of green paint, visually the same as the topcoat of the paints labelled ‘safe’ was found on the surface of the jacket, and a further flake on the surface of the jumper.  That on the jumper was analysed and found to be chemically similar to the topcoat of the paint labelled ‘safe’.

Other Items
Jacket
I was unable to find any material that was the same as the control items on this jacket.

Debris labelled ‘Living Room, 14 Perry View’
Part of this debris consists of crystals of alum, similar to those labelled ‘ballast of safe’.

Nail Bar and screw Driver
The nail bar has some of its original red paint sill present, and this is visually and chemically similar to that found with the sheet of metal labelled ‘safe’.  On the chisel end of the nail bar there is green paint visually and chemically similar to the topcoat of the paints labelled ‘safe’.  The chisel end is the correct size and shows the same characteristic wear as the instrument that made one of the marks on the sheet of metal.
The screwdriver has more than one type of green paint on it.  One type is visually and chemically similar to the green topcoat of paints labelled ‘safe’.

Debris labelled ‘Sweepings under rear seat squab’
In with the general debris there are fragments of paint with a green topcoat over fawn that are visually similar to the top two layers of type B paint labelled ‘safe’

Felt labelled ‘Back Seat Flooring’
On this felt there were crystals of alum similar to those present in the debris labelled ‘Ballast from safe’.

Felt labelled ‘Front Floor Matting’
On this felt were found crystals of alum and paint flakes that correspond visually to the top two layers of type A and C paint.

CONCLUSIONS
Of the items labelled ‘R. Harris’ the right Glove and the left boot have paint on them which must have come from the same place as the control paint labelled ‘Door to Office’.  Also the jeans and flying jacket have been in contact with material that originated from the same source as the debris labelled ‘Ballast from Safe’.

The jumper and jacket labelled ‘P. Harris’ have paint on them that could well have come from the ‘Safe’.

The alum crystals in the debris labelled ’14 Ferry View’ could well have originally formed part of the material labelled ‘Safe’.

The nail bar has almost certainly been used on the sheet of metal labelled ‘Safe’.  There is also paint on the screwdriver which probably came from the ‘Safe’.

The items labelled ‘rear seat squab’ and ‘front floor matting’ contain material which very probably was originally a part of the material labelled ‘Safe’.  The item labelled ‘back seat flooring’ has alum crystals on it that could have originally formed part of the material labelled ‘Safe’.

After examinations I signed the labels.”



Statement of:   Carol Lillian Nicholls
Age:   51 years
Occupation:   Publican
Address:   Brewery Tap Public house, Sheerness, Kent.

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 7th day of April, 1975.

“Further to the statement I made on 16th November, 1974.
To my knowledge, my late husband, Eric Percival Nicholls, never suffered from any heart complaint.  He has never complained of chest pains or the like, to me.”



Statement of:   Michael Ian Nicholls
Age:   27 years
Occupation:   Publican
Address:   Brewery Tap Public house, Sheerness, Kent.

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 7th day of April, 1975.

“Further to the statement I made on 14th December, 1974.
To my knowledge, my late father, Eric Percival Nicholls, never suffered from any heart complaint.  He has never complained of chest pains or the like, to me.”



Statement of:   Dennis Youdale
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Medical Practitioner
Address:   ‘Oak House’, Oak Lane, Minster, Sheppey.

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 8th day of April, 1975.

“I have examined the medical records of my deceased patient, Eric Percival Nicholls and I can confirm that to my knowledge he was never treated for any heart complaint nor complained of any heart trouble.”



Statement of:   Earl Rodney Spencer
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Chief Inspector.
Address:   Police Station, Canterbury..

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 14th day of April, 1975.

“On Friday, 28th February, 1975 I saw Paul John Harris at Canterbury Prison.  I informed him that I now had the result of the Forensic Examination of the Leather Coat and he said,

‘Word has got to me.  I’ve been threatened so I can’t tell you about it.’

I said, ‘Who threatened you?’

He said, ‘My wife and children are outside, so I can’t say.’

I said, ‘You told Police Officers that Stan Northover was wearing a leather coat when the safe was opened.  You showed them where the coat was hidden and said that you could prove the coat belonged to Northover.  How can you prove it?’

Harris said, ‘As I said, I cannot tell you.  I have been threatened.  It was in this grey van when he moved me.  It’s a dormobile.’

I said, ‘So you cannot help me anymore?’

Harris said, ‘No.’

I then told Harris that if he wished to talk to me any further, he knew where to contact me.”

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2013, 18:09:26 »
Statement of:   Leonard Morse, B. Tech.,
Age:   Over 21
Occupation:   Principal Scientific Officer.
Address:   The Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory, 109 Lambeth Road, London SE1 7LP.

This statement (consisting of 5 pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 20th day of February, 1975.

“On 16th December, 1974, I took possession of item AM/A which was in a sealed container.

On 19th December, 1974, my colleague Dr. O. Facey and I took possession of the items listed below which were in sealed containers.  The following items were examined jointly with him:-  MBG/11, 14, 16, 17, and 27, IT/C, D, E, F and G, NAB/A, B, C, G, H, I, N and P, DAMW/A, ERS/F.  I alone examined the following items MBG/3, 13, 28, 29, and FBM/C.

My findings are as follows:-
BLOOD SAMPLE FROM DECEASED (NICHOLL)
This gave reactions for groups, O, EAPB.

BLOOD SAMPLE (R.HARRIS)
This gave reactions for groups O, EAPBA.

BLOOD SAMPLE (P. HARRIS)
This gave reactions for groups A, EAPBA.

SWAB OF STAIN FROM SKIRTING BOARD   ) Both swabs were stained with human blood which
) was not suitable for grouping.
SWAB OF STAIN FROM WINDOW FRAME   )

IRON AND FLEX
This was spotted and smeared with human blood, reactions for group O were obtained, further grouping was inconclusive.  The victim Nicholl and R. Harris are group O.

PYJAMA TOP (Nicholl)
This garment was spotted and smeared with human blood, on the front, shoulders and right cuff.  Reactions for groups O, EAPB were obtained (Nicholls own groups).

TROUSERS (P. Harris)
The left leg of this garment was spotted with human blood a few spots and smears were also present on the right leg.  Reactions for group A were obtained (P. Harris’s own group).  Further typing was inconclusive.

OFF-WHITE JACKET
This bore faint human bloodstains inside the right pocket, small bloodstaining were also present, on both sleeves and on the left breast.  The latter area gave reactions for group O, other typing was inconclusive, P. Harris and the victim Nicholl are group O.

JEANS (R. Harris)
Several small spots of human blood were present on the front of the legs of this garment.  Reactions for group EAPB were obtained from the largest of these, further typing was inconclusive.  The victim Nicholl is EAPB, which occurs in approximately 35% of the British population.

COMBAT JACKET (R. Harris)
Human bloodstains were found on the lining of this item, typing was inconclusive.

Left Boot (R. Harris)
A tiny spot of blood was found on the toe, it was too small for further work.

CONTROL SAMPLE OF SAFE BALLAST

This material contained a high proportion of red/brown coloured sawdust.  The sawdust was predominantly from a mahogany type wood.  (Family Meliaceae), but fragments of other woods were present i.e. Spruce or Larch (species of Picea or Larix), Scots Pine (Pinus Sylvestria), Pitch Pine (Pinus Palustris) and American Cedar (species of Cedrela).

SAFE BALLAST FROM REAR YARD OF ATTACKED PREMISES

This material contained a high proportion of brown sawdust.  The sawdust was predominantly mahogany type but Spruce or Larch, Scots Pine and American Cedar were also present.

FLYING JACKET (R. Harris)
Fragments of sawdust were found in various places on the jacket i.e. in the pockets, trapped under the epaulettes, inside the lower sleeves and on the outside of the garment.  Many of the fragments were tiny and in the form of a fine red/ brown powder.  Of the largest fragments which it was possible to identify, the majority were mahogany type.  Fragments of Spruce or Larch and Pitch Pine were also found.

Human bloodstains were present on both cuffs and on the outside of the garment, typing was inconclusive.

This material contained red/brown fragments of sawdust.  The majority of the fragments examined were too small for complete identification but were microscopically similar to the mahogany type wood in the safe ballast MBG/27.  Fragments of Scots Pine, Oak (a species of Quercus) and Ash (a species of Fraxinus), were also present.  The latter two types were not found in item MBG/27.

FLOORING FELT FROM REAR OF CAR
Material from the surface of this item contained fragments of red/brown sawdust.  The following types of wood were identified:-
Mahogany type, microscopically similar to that in the control safe ballast MBG/27, Spruce or Larch and Pitch Pine.

TAPED DEBRIS FROM TOP OF REAR SEAT SQUAB
Fragments of red/brown sawdust were present in the form of a fine powder.  The fragments were too small to identify, but the overall appearance of the material was similar to the safe ballast MBG/27.

DEBRIS FROM LIVING ROOM FLOOR (14 FERRY VIEW, RUSHENDEN)
Fragments of red/brown sawdust were present in this material.  One fragment of Beech (Fagus Sylvatica) was identified, the other fragments were too small to identify, were more red I colour and resembled the material in the ballast MBG/27.

JUMPER (P. Harris)
Many small fragments of red/brown sawdust were present on the outer surface of the garment.  Wood of mahogany type, spruce or Larch and Scots Pine was identified.

No blood or safe ballast was found on the following items.

Jacket (P. Harris)
Anorak (R. Harris)
Gloves (R. Harris)
Gloves (R. Harris)
Right Boot (R. Harris)
Length of Wood

Conclusions
Blood on the jeans NAB/N could have come from the victim Nicholl and could not have come from R. or P. Harris.
There can be little doubt that the sawdust in items, MBG/11 (ballast from yard) NAB/I (flying jacket), MBG/17 (felt from floor) NAB/C (jumper), originated from the same source as the sample of control safe ballast MBG/27.
The sawdust in items MBG/16 (ballast from underseat), MBG/14 (debris from rear seat squab), DAMW/A (debris from living room floor), probably originated from the same source as the control sample of safe ballast MBG/27.
I have signed the labels attached to the above items.”

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #39 on: December 11, 2013, 16:24:29 »
Still have a few more statements and then onto the paperwork connected to the court case.  I will get there eventually :)

John38

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2013, 16:14:54 »
Taking a lot of your time, kyn, but worth the effort, thank you.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #37 on: December 11, 2013, 14:49:01 »
Statement of:   Earl Rodney Spencer.
Age:   Over 21 years. 
Occupation:   Detective Chief Inspector.
Address:   Police Station, Canterbury, Kent.

This statement (consisting of 1 page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 29th day of January, 1975.

At 10.02 hours on Wednesday, 29th January, 1975 at Sheerness Police Station, I charged Roderick Harry Harris with the offence of murder and served him with the amended robbery charge.  I cautioned him, and he made no reply.

At 10.06 hours on Wednesday, 29th January, 1975 at Sheerness Police Station, I charged Paul John Harris with the offence of murder and served him with an amended robbery charge.  I cautioned him, and he made no reply.

E.R. Spencer signed.



Statement of:   David Andrew Murray Wallace.
Age:   33 years 
Occupation:   Police Constable 3701
Address:   Police Station, Sittingbourne.

This statement (consisting of 1 page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 1st day of February, 1975.

“I am a Police Officer engaged as a photographer in the Kent County Constabulary, stationed at Sittingbourne.  At 4 p.m. on Saturday 1st February, 1975 I attended at Sheerness Police Station.  I was shown a safe (the exhibit FBM/A) which is 20 inches high, 15 inches wide and 14 inches deep.  The back had been removed.  There was no ballast in this safe.  Another person assisted me carrying the safe into daylight, where I photographed it.  I later developed the negative and from this unretouched negative an album containing a photograph was produced (the exhibit marked and labelled DAMW/B).  I still have the unretouched negative in my possession.”

Signed:   D. Wallace.  P.C. 3701.



Statement of:   Samuel Scott
Age:   48 years (Born 1.2.1927)
Occupation:   Barman
Address:   9 Neptune Terrace, Sheerness.

This statement (consisting of 2 pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 1st day of February, 1975.

“In my statement of the 14th December 1974 I described events at the Cellar Club during the evening of Tuesday 10th December, 1974.

I am still today employed by Mr. Stanley Northover as a barman.  The ground floor entrance of the Cellar Club comprises a room with a kitchen at the far end.  The basement of the building is the Club itself whilst the living accommodation of Mr. and Mrs. Northover is on the first floor.

I was in the Club part of the premises with Mr. Northover and Paul and Rod Harris until about 1.15 a.m. in Wednesday, 11th December, 1974.  It was at that time that Paul and Rod Harris left the Club together and Mr. Northover escorted them both upstairs to the main entrance.  I did not see either Paul or Rod again that night.

A few moments later Mr. Northover called downstairs to me from the kitchen and asked if I wanted a coffee and I said I did.  Whilst he made this I remained in the club making up my bed.  I always sleep on a settee and chair in the Club.  I was getting ready to get into bed two or three minutes later when Mr. Northover came downstairs with coffee for us both.

Mr. Northover and I sat talking together until about 3.30 a.m. when he went upstairs to his flat.  Shortly afterwards I went to sleep.

Mr. Northover definitely did not leave the club that evening between about 11.30 p.m. on Tuesday 10th December and 3.30 p.m. on Wednesday 11th December, 1974.

I am also certain that neither Paul nor Rod Harris re-entered the club after leaving it about 1.15 a.m. that night.

I have known Mr. Northover for the last ten years.  I have worked both for him and his father during all of that time.”

Signed:   S. Scott

This statement was taken by me at Marine Parade, Sheerness on 1.2.75.  I read it over to Samuel Scott and he read and signed it in my presence.

Signed:   F. B. Marsh D.S.



Statement of:   Frank Bryan Marsh.
Age:   Over 21 years. 
Occupation:   Detective Sergeant of Police.
Address:   Police Station, Sheerness.

This statement (consisting of 2 pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 2nd day of February, 1975.

“On Saturday 1st February, 1975 I went to the Brewery Tap public house, High Street, Sheerness, where I took certain measurements as follows:-

Office on first floor of building to window on landing of first floor is 37 feet.
Height of window from landing of first floor is 5 feet 1 inch.
Drop from same window to flat roof outside is 2 feet.
Length of flat roof outside same window is 27 feet.
Drop from flat roof to back garden is 15 feet.
Length of back garden from level of flat roof to wall at extreme end of garden is 45 feet.
Height of wall at end of back garden is 4 feet 9 inches.
Distance between wall at end of back garden to gate in Delemark School play ground is 200 feet.
Height of this same gate from ground level is 5 feet 5 inches.
Distance between this same gate and the end of the trail of ballast dust as described in my earlier statement is 530 feet.

The total distance, therefore, between the office on the first floor of the Brewery Tap to the end of the trail of ballast dust is 839 feet.

With regard to the safe (labelled and marked FBM/A) this measures 20” high by 15” wide by 14” deep and now weighs 109 ¼ lbs.  This is without back plate, ballast and contents.

Because of its size and weight, it would not be possible for one man alone to move or carry the safe through or over the various obstacles described along a total distance of 839 feet.”

Signed:   F.B. Marsh.



Statement of:   Robert Maxwell Quinnel
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Sergeant
Address:   Police Headquarters, Sutton Road, Maidstone.

This statement (consisting of 1 page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 5th day of February, 1975.

“I am engaged in the Photographic Department, Police Headquarters, Maidstone.

On 5th February, 1975, I reproduced photographically the ordnance survey sheet No. TQ 97 SW which is to a scale of 1 to 10,000.  These are the exhibits labelled and marked RMQ/A.

I also reproduced a small section of the same map and made enlargements which show part of the Sheerness town area.  These are the exhibits labelled and marked RMQ/B.

Signed:   R.M. Quinnell
 


Statement of:   Earl Rodney Spencer
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Chief Inspector.
Address:   Police Station, Canterbury, Kent.

This statement (consisting of 1 page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 5th day of February, 1975.

At 10.32 hrs on Wednesday, 5th February, 1975, I charged Paul John Harris with an offence of grievous bodily harm.  I cautioned him and he said ‘Not without my Solicitor.’

At 10.34 hrs on Wednesday, 5th February, 1975, I charged Roderick Harry Harris with an offence of grievous bodily harm.  I cautioned him and he made no reply.

(Signed) E.R. Spencer
 


Statement of:   William Daniel Campbell Wilson
Age:   Over 21
Occupation:   Senior Scientific Officer.
Address:   The Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory, 109 Lambeth Road, London, SE1 7LF.

This statement (consisting of 2 pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 11th day of February, 1975.

“On the 28th January 1975 I took possession of items MBG/23-26 and on the 29th, item MBG/22. All of these being sealed.  On the 28th January I took possession of item MBG/27 from my colleague Dr. Facey, and items MBG/16 and 17 from Mr. Morse on the 5th February.  I have examined these items, with the exception of MBG/24 and 25.

STOMACH
This was empty, and no tablet particulars could be discerned adhering to its walls.

URINE
This contained small amounts of the metabolites of the tranquiliser diazepam (“Valium”), most commonly prescribed to combat anxiety.  No other drugs were detected, but a very small amount of alcohol was present.

BLOOD
Evidence was gained consistent with the presence of a small amount of diazepam below even the “normal” therapeutic levels of this drug.  It is not controlled by the Misuse of Drugs Act but is available only on prescription.  No other drugs were detected and no alcohol was present.

MBG/27   LABELLED “CONTROL SAMPLE OF BALLAST”
From this material was removed 14 pink sugar-coated tablets, 6 beige sugar-coated tablets and 8 black capsules.  These were identified as “Brufen”, “Tanderil” and “Plastules”  respectively.  “Brufen” and “Tanderil” are available only on prescription and are generally employed in rheumatoid disorders.  “Plastules” are an iron preparation.

MBG/16   LABELLED “QUANTITY OF SAFE BALLAST UNDER REAR SEAT”

MBG/17   LABELLED “FLOORING FELT FROM REAR OF CAR””

No tablet fragments were found in these.

After analysis I signed the labels and resealed items MBG/22, 23 and 26.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #36 on: December 04, 2013, 09:51:25 »
Statement of:   Walter Somerville M.D., F.R.C.P.
Age:   Over 21 years.
Occupation:   Consultant Physician to Dept. of Cardiology.
Address:   Middlesex Hospital.

“This report is based on a post mortem examination of the heart of Eric Nicholls deceased.  It was carried out at the Middlesex Hospital on 22nd January, 1975.

The events preceeding the death of Mr. Nicholls on 11th December, 1974, have been set out in other reports and will not be recapitulated.

The heart was large, weighing 445 grams, which is above the normal weight for a man of his age and build.  There was a clot in the right coronary artery and an additional narrowing of the artery, the result of atheroma.  Atheroma is a substance which leads to the gradual narrowing of an artery over a period of 5 – 15 years or more and is the common factor in the condition of coronary heart disease.  The left coronary artery was also diseased and deposits of calcium could be felt in the wall.  There were also areas of narrowing in this artery and its main branches.  Microscopical examinations carried out by Dr. Harse of the London Hospital Medical School demonstrated areas of fibrosis in the heart muscle.  Fibrosis occurs as a result of impairment of blood supply to the heart muscle as a result of narrowing of the coronary arteries.  The fibrosis and the atheroma had been present for years prior to the death; the clot was a recent event and was intimately associated with the deceased’s death.

The question I had to answer was whether the deceased’s death had been caused by or related to the heart disease in any way and whether the assault had played any part in the fatal outcome.

In my opinion, death did result from the diseased heart.  The most likely sequence of events was that the combination of (a) trauma inflicted on the deceased, (b) his struggles to release himself from his bonds and (c) the different emotions, such as fear and fright, which affected him during the attack, during the struggles to release himself and in the hours between then and the time of his death, acting on an already diseased heart, all contributed to the production of an acute and fatal coronary heart attack.  By the term ‘coronary heart attack’ I mean that the rhythm of the heart already diseased by coronary artery disease would have been disturbed in such a way that its function had been gravely impaired, the flow of blood to the brain and through the coronary arteries would have been diminished or stopped, and death resulted.  This is a common and well-recognised mode of death in persons with heart disease of the type under discussion.  The clot in the right coronary artery probably commenced contemporaneously with these events and may have increased in size in the period while the heart was still beating but the output of blood was minimal or zero.

If the assault had not occurred, the fatal heart attack would not have developed when it did.  Mr. Nicholls was a candidate for a heart attack some time in the future and it is likely that his life expectation was shorter than normal. Nevertheless, his freedom from any previous complaints of heart disease suggested that a heart attack would have been unlikely in the forthcoming months or even years.  It is probable that his expectation of life would have been of the order of 5 to 7 years.”

Walter Somerville.

This statement containing two pages, each signed by me is true to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I make it knowing that if it is tendered in evidence I shall be prosecuted if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false of do not believe to be true.

Dated the 24th day of January, 1975.
Signed:   Walter Somerville.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2013, 09:30:50 »
Statement of:   Michael Barry Goodwin.
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Police constable 3886.
Address:   Police Station, Canterbury..

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 16th day of January, 1975.

“I am stationed at Canterbury where I am engaged on Scenes of Crime duties.

At 9.15 a.m. Thursday 16th January, 1975, at Sheerness Police Station, I was handed a brown leather coat, rolled-up in a papersack, by Police Sergeant Conyers.  I took possession of this coat and sealed the package.

At 11.05 a.m. the same day I delivered the brown coat to the Metropolitan Police Laboratory, London.”


Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #34 on: December 03, 2013, 21:54:40 »
Statement of:   Frank Bryan Marsh
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Sergeant of Police.
Address:   Police Station, sheerness.

This statement (consisting of three pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 15th day of January, 1975.

“At 3 p.m. on Wednesday, 15th January, 1974, I went to a cell at Sheerness Police Station where I saw Paul John Harris.
I said to him, ‘I have come to see you about the coat you told Sergeant Conyers about.’
He said, ‘Yes.’
I said, ‘I understand that you say it belongs to Stan Northover.’
He said, ‘Yes it does and I can prove it.’
I said, ‘What has it got to do with this case?’
He said, ‘Stan was wearing it at the time of the robbery.’
I said, ‘You keep on changing your story.  Last week you called me and made a statement saying Stan had nothing to do with the robbery.’
He said, ‘Look, me and Rod made an arrangement that we would both make a statement.  Rod was to say that I had nothing to do with the robbery and I had to say that Stan had nothing to do with it.’
I said, ‘How was that going to help?’
He said, ‘You’ve got no evidence against me at all and if Rod told the truth he would say I wasn’t on the robbery but Stan was.’
I said, ‘According to Sammy, Stan never left the club that night, just you and Rod.’
He said, ‘Don’t you worry about that.  Sammy will crack when he gives evidence.’
I said, ‘In what way?’
He said, ‘I can tell you something you don’t know.’
I said, ‘Go on then.’
He said, ‘After rod’s car ran out of petro he went to the Harps Estate where he got a very good friend of his to drive him to the Cellar Club.  They got to the Club at 4.45 and Sammy let them both in.  Rod had all the money and gear with him for Stan to look after.
I said, ‘What is this man’s name?’
He said, ‘I can’t tell you that because I don’t know, but I shall find out.  Then Sammy will crack.’
I said, ‘Coming back to the coat, how do you know it belongs to Stan?’
He said, ‘I can prove it does.  I’ve got two witnesses who have seen it.’
I said, ‘What are their names?’
He said, ‘Oh no, you’re not getting them unless I can do a deal.’
I said, ‘Don’t be silly.  This could be important for you.’
He said, ‘I want some help.  I want to get out of this rap.  Stan Northover should be here, not me.’
I said, ‘If you have some evidence which helps prove the involvement of Stan Northover, then it must be in your interest to disclose it.’
He said, ‘No, I want an out.’
I said, ‘Have you spoken to your Solicitor about this?’
He said, ‘No.’
I said, ‘I suggest you do.  I’m sure he will give you the same advice.’
He said, ‘I’ll think about it.’
I said, ‘Do that, also speak to your Solicitor and I will see you again.’”



Statement of:   Donald Conyers
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Police Sergeant.
Address:   Sheerness Police Station.

This statement (consisting of one page signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 16th day of January, 1975.

“At 11.45 hrs on Wednesday 15th January, 1975 I was on duty at Sheerness Police Station.  Whilst checking the prisoners Paul John Harris and Roderick Harry Harris in the cells, Paul Harris said to me, ‘Come here Sarge I want to talk to you, come in cause I don’t want Rod to hear.’

I went into the cell and said, ‘What’s up Paul?’
He replied, ‘I’m not swinging for Rod and Stan, I’m going to tell you how to get Stan.’
I then said, ‘What are you going to tell me?’
He then said, ‘He was wearing an old leather when they opened the peter and he got peter dust on it, and I slashed it for him.’
I then said, ‘Where is it?’

He then gave me directions and I left him in the cell.  I made a search of an area of waste ground adjacent to the unmade road that joins First and Second Avenue, Rushenden.  I found a gents brown leather coat, screwed up beneath some grass in a shallow ditch.  I took possession of the coat.  I returned to Sheerness Police Station, where I again saw Paul Harris.  I said to Harris, ‘I have found the coat where you said, now how can it be proved that it belongs to Stan Northover?’
He replied, ‘I’ve got two people who can say that it was in his van just before the job.’
I then said, ‘Who are they?’
He replied, ‘Ah!  I want to know how it’s going to help me first.’
I then said, ‘You have been charged with the robbery, if you want to say it was Stan Northover that was involved and not you, I would suggest you assist the Police in proving that, and if you can tie this jacket to him, and we can tie the jacket to the robbery by forensic examination, then these facts might assist you.’
He replied, ‘Yes, well I’ll think about it.’
I then left Paul Harris in the cell.
At 0915 hrs on Thursday the 16th January 1975 I handed the jacket to P.C. Goodwin. .”

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2013, 10:08:50 »
Statement of:   Frank Bryan Marsh
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Detective Sergeant of Police.
Address:   Police Station, sheerness.

This statement (consisting of two pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 8th day of January, 1975.

“At 9.45 a.m. on Wednesday 8th January, 1975, I went to a cell at Sheerness Police Station where I saw the defendants Paul Harris and Roderick Harris together. 
I said to them both, ‘I understand you want to see me.’
Paul Harris said, ‘Yes, I want to make another statement.’
I said, ‘Have you seen your Solicitor?’
He said, ‘No.’
I said, ‘I suggest you see him first.’
I then said to Roderick Harris, ‘What about you?’
He said, ‘Yes.’
I told him also to see his Solicitor.

At 2.25 p.m. the same day, together with Detective Constable Biddiss, I again saw Paul Harris.
I said to him, ‘Have you seen your Solicitor?’
He said, ‘Yes.’
I said, ‘Do you still wish to make another statement?’
He said, ‘Yes.’
He then made a statement, under caution, (labelled and marked FBM/G) which I took down in writing at his dictation.  I afterwards read it over to him and he read and signed it in my presence.

At 2.50 p.m. the same day, I again saw Roderick Harris, in the presence of Detective Constable Biddiss.
I said, ‘Do you still want to make a statement?’
He said, ‘I don’t.  Paul wants me to make one to row him out of it.’
I said, ‘Do you want to make one?’
He said, ‘No, Mr. Rooke told me not to make one because I might make it worse for me.’
I said, ‘Is the second statement you made the truth?’
He said, ‘Yes.’
I said, ‘Do you want to alter it?’
He said, ‘No.’
The interview then concluded.

Signed:   F.B. Marsh.



Statement of:   Paul John Harris.
Age:   24 yrs. (B.29.9.50).
Occupation:   Painter.
Address:   14 Ferry View, Rushenden, Sheppey.

I, Paul John Harris, wish to make a statement.  I want someone to write down what I say.  I have been told that I need not say anything unless I wish to do so and that whatever I say may be given in evidence.

Signed:   P.J. Harris.

“I, Paul John Harris, wish to make a statement to the police concerning the events of the 11th December.

At approximately 12.30 am to 1.30 am that morning, I mean Wednesday 11th December, I left a club which goes under the name of the ‘Cellar’ with my brother Rod.  We got into his car.  He then drove me to my place of abode.  As I was leaving his car he said to me, ‘I will see you later Babe.’

To this I thought he meant later the same day in the evening, but then he turned up at my house at 4.30 am that same morning, carrying two small bags, one nail bar and a large screwdriver.  He then asked me to look after the two tools, to which I said I would.  He then went into an explanation of what he’d done that night omitting that there had been any violence used.  He then asked me to say that if the police questioned me about his movements that he had been around my house about seven or eight o’clock that morning.  The statement I made to the police about a third person was a complete fictionary statement.  I have no knowledge whatsoever whether the person I named in it had anything to do with it.  That’s the lot.”

Signed:    P.J. Harris

“I have read the above statement and I have been told that I can correct alter or add anything I wish this statement is true and I have made it of my own free will.”

Signed P.J. Harris.

This statement was taken by me at Sheerness Police Station on 8.1.75.  I read it over to Paul John Harris and he read it and signed it in my presence.

Signed:   F.B. Marsh.

Statement commenced 2.30 p.m.
Statement concluded 2.45 p.m.

I was present when this statement was taken.

Signed:   N. Biddiss.  DC. 4272.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2013, 09:55:05 »
Statement of:   John Benjamin Harse. M.B., M.R.C.S., D.M.J.(Path).
Age:   Over 21 years
Occupation:   Forensic Pathologist.
Address:   The London Hospital Medical College, Turner Street, London E1 2AD.

This statement (consisting of two pages signed by me) is true to the best of my knowledge and belief and I make it knowing that, if it is tendered in evidence, I shall be liable to prosecution if I have wilfully stated in it anything which I know to be false or do not believe to be true.

Dated the 31st day of December, 1974.

“At 5.25 p.m. on 12th December, 1974, I visited the Brewery tap, Public House, High Street, Sheerness, in the company of Detective Superintendent Booth, Detective Chief Inspector Spencer, Detective Sergeant Vickery, Police Constable Simpson, P.C. Goodwin, where I was shown the body of an elderly male who was laying to one side of the slept in bed.  Body was formally identified to me by P.C. Simpson, Coroner’s Officer in the presence of Michael Ian Nicholls (son) and David Hine being that of:  Eric Nicholls apparent age 61 years.

Body was clothed in pyjamas and socks.

Later the same evening at 6.30 p.m. in the presence of the above officers and Inspector Woodland I performed an autopsy on the body of Eric Nicholls.  Photographs taken under my direction by P.C. Goodwin and Detective Sergeant Vickery.

Body clothed in:-
An Omega watch which was still working on the left wrist.  Fawn socks with blood stains on the uppers.  Red and white patterned pyjamas.  Res and white yellow striped trunks, white vest, small old blood stains on the back.  There was a yellow metal ring on the left ring finger.

Body was that of a 5’8” well nourished make with purple posterior livid staining and rigor mortis present in the upper and lower limbs.  There was blood staining around the nostrils and there was a bruise with related bruising in the pupil and the whites of the eyes, outer aspect of the right eye.  Bruises and abrasions over the back of left hand and fingers.  There was bruising over the outer aspect of the right wrist and over the back of the right hand.  Slight bruising with abrasion over the right shoulder.  Severe bruising to the upper lip.  No apparent injury to the chest, neck or back.  There was a hernia of the left groin and a deformity with loss of muscle on inner aspect of left wrist and hand.  There was a generalised psoriatic rash over the front and backs of the legs, small of the back and buttocks and severe ulceration of the lower limbs.  This was covered with bandages.”

Further details not included in transcription.

Summary.
1.   A 5’8” well nourished male, showing external evidence of a common skin condition psoriasis.
2.   Injuries compatible with blows by or against the body including a fractured nose.
3.   Severe natural disease of the heart and of the liver.
4.   Heart and other tissues are being examined.
5.   At this moment in time until (4) is complete a full report is not possible.”

J.B. Harse.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #31 on: November 28, 2013, 19:31:55 »
My Mum vaguely remembers something happening but no details, it is surprising how quickly people forget about big events!

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #30 on: November 28, 2013, 19:29:18 »
Fascinating Kyn. Especially as living in Sittingbourne, and working in Sheerness docks/river at that time, I have no recollection of this incident
thanks 

Offline kyn

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #29 on: November 28, 2013, 17:50:40 »
 :)

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Sheerness Robbery 1974
« Reply #28 on: November 28, 2013, 17:16:00 »
And me Kyn, thanks for your hard work .
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

 

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