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Author Topic: St. Margarets Bay  (Read 8225 times)

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Offline otis

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2016, 11:14:25 »
Thanks John.

I get that the ground level openings could be shelters at the rear of defence works. What is the deal with the high level one with the water pipe ?
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline JohnG

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2016, 22:12:00 »
Royal Marine Commandos were stationed at St Margaret's to be on hand in case the Germans did a commando type raid on the long range gun batteries. Landing on the beach, going up the valley to South Foreland Battery and then onto Wanstone Battery and then out again the same way they came in.  There are defences built to counter this type of attack. While the RM Commando's were there they trained down in the bay which did serious damage to the buildings down on the beach and familiarised them with the area. There was a concrete wall along the beach and Admiralty scaffolding, mines and a flame barrage on the beach.  JohnG

Offline otis

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2016, 16:15:13 »
Thanks Towerwill.

The mg tunnel the other end of the bay is so well known. I am surprised the works at the other end of the bay are not ?
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline TowerWill

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2016, 15:15:04 »
Going up to the clifftop above the bay I remember there was something like a roofed slit trench close to the cliff edge. The end nearest the cliff had a little window cut in the chalk of the cliff face which looked out over the sea. On a later walk up the footpath this area had a wooden security fence around it. Possibly it is all filled in now.

Offline otis

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2016, 00:01:13 »
Here is the entrance with the pipe below. Anyone know what these were please ?
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline otis

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2016, 18:22:21 »
I was at the other end of the bay today, just at the end of the car park, and before the row of white houses.

Set in the chalk cliff there are four more entrances. The furthest one is about six foot above the ground, and seems to be just one room ?

There are two more further back. One quite low and the second is set very high up with a pipe coming out below.

The fourth one is ground level with a broken gate.

Anyone know what these were and if they are worth exploring further. A leg injury is restricting me right now and after being sent to climb into the first high one, my girlfriend's interest in looking further waned rather rapidly !
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline JohnG

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2011, 21:36:05 »
St Margarets Bay.  I noticed a few weeks ago that there are two lines of concrete blocks with a length of verticle rail set in them.  These are in the bank opposite South Sands House on the corner which means there must have been a block across the road up to gardens and on up to South Foreland Battery.  There was a fougass on the first leg of the road up from the beech.  The tanks were in the garden of the house called 'The Edge'.  I have a couple of photographs of the tanks and pipes taken during installation.
JohnG

Solarp

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2010, 02:33:17 »
How on earth has that happened!

Offline unfairytale

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2010, 23:27:34 »
The beach at St Margaret's bay has gained an extra 12 feet of shingle over the last few months, Just look at this photo I took last September!

When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline LenP

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2009, 23:37:34 »
A couple of enlargements from old postcards:

This is post war:



This is pre war:



If the tunnel pre dates the Second War defences, presumably it emerged somewhere else?

Offline unfairytale

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Re: St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2009, 19:19:40 »
Islesy and I visited this place earlier this year.
Some folks call this the St. Margarets machine gun post as it seems to have been adapted during the war but a visit to the nearby Coastguard pub, strictly for research purposes you understand, proves that this tunnel shows up on many old maps and photos from the mid 1800s.

  Entrance to this tunnel is through a small hole in a concrete structure jutting out from the cliff face, as the one on the esplanade has been bricked-up for years. Now at our age we really don't want to be clambering up some dodgy old rope that's been there for years and slipping on slime covered chalk... We just took a very long ladder with us and with an audience of drinkers from the nearby pub simply climbed up and in. 

  Here's my photos:
Just after climbing up


Looking in:


Turn right at the end:


And right again to see the bricked-up esplanade entrance:


Un lined parallel section


Here's the south end of the tunnel: Stairs leading to another opening 40ft above the beach.


Back to the exit:


And back on the beach:


The machine gun post was manned by members of the 70th Battalion The Buffs until November 1940 when it was taken over by the 5th Battalion Royal Marines. The Buffs were then moved to guarding the sites of Winnie and Pooh and the radar station at South Foreland battery.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline BenG

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St. Margarets Bay
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2008, 15:45:46 »
A type 22 (?) with brick cladding located on the esplande at St. Margarets Bay.






 

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