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Author Topic: Kemsley Mill  (Read 9248 times)

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Offline Desbrow

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #25 on: August 12, 2015, 17:15:46 »
The recently released Tate collection of photos taken by John Piper includes about half a dozen images of the mill and creek.  They can been seen here:

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/archive/tga-8728-1-20/piper-photographs-of-kent/objects?limit=100&page=2

They start about a third of the way down the page.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2015, 09:20:34 »
Many thanks :)
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2015, 22:49:58 »
I thought it was Kemsley Mill that produced the newsprint. What does it produce now?


It is still owned by D S Smith. see http://www.dssmith.com/paper/about/paper-mills/kemsley-UK/ for list of products and nice modern aerial shot to compare with the views from the 1930's.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2015, 21:33:29 »
Thanks. At least the firm it went to has a British sounding name :)
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2015, 19:06:49 »
I think it was packaging. Later bought by Crest Packaging I think.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2015, 18:41:13 »
I thought it was Kemsley Mill that produced the newsprint. What does it produce now?

So the newsprint that was once carried to the London presses on those lorries now comes from Germany – and perhaps made further east than that – to Aylesford, presumably for storage, before being taken on to the printers. Can that be more efficient than taking it straight from the mill to the printer, all part of one process?

Probably off-topic, but to complete the picture for me, what was the purpose of the Bowaters plant at Gillingham, now occupied by Tesco et al?
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Offline grandarog

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2015, 18:17:10 »
peterchall

Kemsley Mill hasn't closed, it was Sittingbourne Mill that went, to be replaced by a Morrison`s Supermarket and a mountain of hard core where the developers reneged on the agreement to build houses.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2015, 17:24:38 »
Thanks. No surprise that it was foreign.

Perhaps Kemsley Mill just became obsolete and couldn’t get the finance to modernise, but its closure was another step in our industrial decline.

Attached is a pre-war Bowaters AEC Mammoth Major, restored, I believe, by Len Transport of Gravesend
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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2015, 16:44:28 »
It was delivered to a warehouse at Aylesford from Germany.

S4.
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2015, 21:50:56 »
As for today most Newsprint is delivered on the back of 45 foot Articulated Trailers, done a few runs into Surrey Quays myself.

S4.
Where did you pick the newsprint up from, please?
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2015, 21:13:06 »
Yes it was scrapped at Torry Hill. Sentinel S4 told me about a couple of years ago. Strangely, my Dad, who drove it for many years and had quite a few tales to tell about the Sentinel, never told me what happened to it, probably because I didn`t ask.

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2015, 20:44:24 »
Very interesting S4 and thanks for posting.  What became of the Sentinel, is this the one we suspect was scrapped at Torry Hill?


I have just read her makers plate and it states '6 ton steam waggon or 10 tons with trailer'. Now that refers to the old system of loading and the maximum she could carry and what the trailer could carry. Today I drive an 18 tonne lorry. That is her all-up weight including load (in truth a little over 2 tons more than the Standard Sentinel). Today the weight of the vehicle is included in the weight displayed, another 'innovation' from the continent. All up she would have weighed with load around 10 or 11 tons, the Sentinels on pneumatics could carry a couple of tons more, I believe they were rated for 8 tons solo and 14 tons with a matched pneumatic shod trailer (please not she is on solid tyres in the pictures). Edward Lloyd's would know to the ounce the weight of the newsprint reels and I doubt very much if she came close to being overloaded, the fines were as sever then as now AND they would have been all on the Driver not the company.

Yes these were classed as a Heavy Motor Car, Traction Engines had three classes, Light Tractor, Locomotive and Heavy Tractor. The Light were small engines (the Aveling and Porter 'Spider' was one) built down to a specific weight for road taxation purposes, Locomotives were the standard traction engines that we all know ad love whilst the Heavy Tractors were the big Showmans Engines and Road Locomotives of the heavy haulage industry.

As an aside when my Father bought this Sentinel from Lloyd's he steered her through Sittingbourne and out to Torry Hill whilst Bryn's Father drove her. Dad was 14 at the time and was too young to hold a licence BUT was old enough to be a 'Steersman'. This is still the case on Traction Engines and certain Steam Waggons, however as a Roller (steam or diesel) is a solo operation machine then you can drive them on your own legally on almost any road in the Country whilst displaying "L" plates until you pass your test.

S4.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2015, 20:10:02 »
Thanks. But where is the newsprint made? Somebody must have taken over from Bowaters - why did they lose the contract?.

I have vague memories of visiting Kemsley Mills - it must have been a school visit - and I think the paper came off the mill in rolls three or four times the width it was carried on the lorries, and was actually sliced into 'lorry sized' widths by saws
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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2015, 19:32:31 »
Steam Waggons and internal combustion vehicles on Solid Tyres were limited to 25 mph. However those on Pneumatics were allowed to go faster. The Sentinel S4 (and all the "S" types) could easily keep up with modern vehicles, they were certainly doing 50 + mph in the 1930's. On the otherhand Traction Engines of all classes were restricted to 4 mph Urban and 8 mph extra-urban. I will tell you that all Traction engine Drivers were regulars for speeding fines... Along with Excessive Smoke and Excessive Steam fines.

As for today most Newsprint is delivered on the back of 45 foot Articulated Trailers, done a few runs into Surrey Quays myself.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2015, 17:13:27 »
Then there was the limit of 20 mph on vehicles over 3 tons GVW - or was it 5 tons? Vehicles subject to it had to carry a round white on black '20' plate at the back.

Now off in another direction - where do the London newspaper presses get their newsprint from today, and how is it transported to them?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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