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Author Topic: Kemsley Mill  (Read 9271 times)

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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2015, 16:57:06 »
I have just read her makers plate and it states '6 ton steam waggon or 10 tons with trailer'. Now that refers to the old system of loading and the maximum she could carry and what the trailer could carry. Today I drive an 18 tonne lorry. That is her all-up weight including load (in truth a little over 2 tons more than the Standard Sentinel). Today the weight of the vehicle is included in the weight displayed, another 'innovation' from the continent. All up she would have weighed with load around 10 or 11 tons, the Sentinels on pneumatics could carry a couple of tons more, I believe they were rated for 8 tons solo and 14 tons with a matched pneumatic shod trailer (please not she is on solid tyres in the pictures). Edward Lloyd's would know to the ounce the weight of the newsprint reels and I doubt very much if she came close to being overloaded, the fines were as severe then as now AND they would have been all on the Driver not the company.

Yes these were classed as a Heavy Motor Car, Traction Engines had three classes, Light Tractor, Locomotive and Heavy Tractor. The Light were small engines (the Aveling and Porter 'Spider' was one) built down to a specific weight for road taxation purposes, Locomotives were the standard traction engines that we all know and love whilst the Heavy Tractors were the big Showmans Engines and Road Locomotives of the heavy haulage industry.

As an aside when my Father bought this Sentinel from Lloyd's he steered her through Sittingbourne and out to Torry Hill whilst Bryn's Father drove her. Dad was 14 at the time and was too young to hold a licence BUT was old enough to be a 'Steersman'. This is still the case on Traction Engines and certain Steam Waggons, however as a Roller (steam or diesel) is a solo operation machine then you can drive them on your own legally on almost any road in the Country whilst displaying "L" plates until you pass your test.

S4.
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2015, 16:30:10 »
It comes back to me now.

It was definitely 22 tons Gross Laden Weight (GLW) on 4 axles, so payload depended on unladen weight of the vehicle..

There was also a maximum weight on each axle and on each tyre; hence the need for twin wheels on some of the axles.

I think it was 12 tons GLW with 2 axles, but can’t remember what it was with 3 axles.

Also they were not officially called ‘lorries’ but ‘heavy motor cars’ - isn’t it wonderful how odd bits of memory come back once the ball starts rolling, so that we end up all confused? :)
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2015, 15:30:36 »
Here`s three photos showing the paper mill`s Sentinel Standard loaded with reels, probably to be delivered to the Ashford area. Although a bit `off topic`, I though Sentinel S4 may know the maximum weigh it was able to carry. I thought around 6 tons, in which case all three appear to be grossly overloaded, but I expect I`ve got it all wrong.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2015, 15:09:22 »
If I remember correctly all Flat bed Lorries of that era had a max payload of 15 tons .Most were about 12 tons just the really heavies could carry 15 tons. I remember the old ex-army Albions struggled with 10 ton of fruit up to Covent Garden Market in the 1950,s. :)

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2015, 10:49:23 »
One lost its load on Chatham Hill, but I can't remember when. The reels rolled down the hill and simply flattened any cars in the way.

I found the attached photo of one - sorry it's not very big. It looks as if the reels were simply roped on. Either the vehicle's load capacity was 22 tons or its maximum weight was 22 tons, making load about 16 tons. So, judging from the number of reels, they weighed about a ton or about 15cwt each
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Offline filmer01

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2015, 09:15:35 »
I spent most of my youth living on the A2 opposite the Tuck Inn transport cafe near Hartlip. Those lorries were a very familiar sight, especially impressive to a seven year old threading his way across that car park to the shop at the front of the cafe, they seemed huge, and a bit unstable across the rather bumpy car park surface.

My memory is that everything was simply(?) roped on, as ratchet straps were yet to come and moveable loads quite common.
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2015, 08:48:25 »
Yes, I remember them well, Peterchall. Hardly a day passed without seeing one. I think they used to cause problems at the Well Hall roundabout. They seemed to like toppling over there, or was it just losing their load? Those reels were extremely heavy. I was once on a Coroner`s Jury regarding the death of someone who was hit by one.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2015, 08:29:23 »
Does anyone recall the nightly procession of AEC Mammoth Major 8-wheel lorries carrying rolls of newsprint from Kemsley Mills to the London newspapers? I think one passed by about every 5 minutes from about 5pm to 9pm, if my memory is correct
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Kemsley Mill
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2015, 00:41:54 »
Kemsley Paper Mill was opened by Edward Lloyd Ltd in 1924 as an extension of Sittingboune Paper Mill. A garden village for its employees was opened in 1927, this becoming the present day Kemsley village.
After Frank Lloyds death in 1936, the renamed Lloyd group was taken over by Sir William Derry, who formed the Bowater-Lloyd group.
In 1980 UK Paper completed a management buy-out and the site was split in two, the fine paper operation remained with UK Paper and later M-Real, while the recycled paper operation was sold to the St Regis Paper Company.
In 1986 St Regis became part of DS Smith Paper Ltd.
In 1998 the Finnish based paper company Metsä Serla acquired the paper production operation of UK Paper.
In 2008 DS Smith acquired the entire site.

There are 11 aerial views of Kemsley paper mill @ http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/asearch?search=kemsley%20paper
4 shots from May 1930, 7 from July 1936.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Kemsley Mill
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2013, 09:39:09 »
A view of Kemsley Mill from the roof of Holy Trinity, Milton Regis.

 

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