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Author Topic: Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury  (Read 4337 times)

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merc

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Re: Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2013, 14:32:36 »
Friday, January 27, 1928

Hales Place, Canterbury, for some time a school for French boys and formerly a county seat, is to be demolished.

From The Times.

merc

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Re: Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2013, 19:05:35 »
Tuesday, January 27, 1925

The Estate Market - Hales Place, Canterbury

Hales Place, on the northern outskirts of Canterbury, is to be offered by auction in London shortly by Messrs. Daniel Smith, Oakley, and Garrard, and Messrs. H. and R. L. Cobb (Charles Street, St. James's Square and Rochester). It is a freehold of 154 acres. Additions in the last 40 years, or so, have resulted in the conversion of what was originally a county seat into a collegiate institution, containing about 135 rooms. It was for many years an important school for French boys, many distinguished Frenchmen sending their sons there.

Histories of Kent refer to the estate, and a summary of Hasted and another writer may be quoted:-

Hales Place is a noble structure, in an extensive and beautiful park. The building of it was begun in the year 1768. The manor was one of Bishop Odo's almost innumerable estates. Early owners included Simon de Montfort : Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, second son of Henry III. : Sir Roger Manwood, Chief Baron of the Exchequer in the reign of Elizabeth ; and Sir Thomas Colepeper. The son of the last named sold the estate in 1675 to the eldest son of Sir E. Hales, Bt., of Tunstall, who in 1678, with the King's license, enclosed a park, the old one having been for some time disparked. His great grandson, Sir Edward Hales, Bt., pulled down the ancient Place House, built by Sir Roger Manwood, and instead of it erected, in the park, the present magnificent edifice, which he named 'Hales Place'.

From The Times.

merc

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Re: Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2013, 13:02:58 »
Wednesday, January 7, 1885

The New Year festivities at St. Mary's (Jesuit) College, Hale Place, near Canterbury, have been carried out on a grand scale. On Monday the parents and friends of the pupils, many of whom belong to the nobility of France, were entertained, together with a large number of the principle residents of the neighbourhood, in the spacious college hall.

From The Birmingham Daily Post.


merc

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Re: Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2013, 17:24:26 »
Tuesday, January 31, 1882

The spacious wing being added to the Jesuit College at Hales Place, near Canterbury, is rapidly proceeding towards completion, and when finished will afford accommodation for a much larger number of students than are now located there. Indeed, in the aggregate, the old and new buildings are arranged to provide residence for 1,000 of the youths exiled with their instructors from France. When the work at present in hand has been finished a new undertaking will be entered upon by the erection of another wing, and if this arrangement is carried out by the Jesuit College at Canterbury will be one of the largest buildings in Kent.

From The Ispwich Journal.

merc

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Hales Place, Hackington - near Canterbury
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2013, 19:59:07 »
Friday, February 11, 1881

The late French Military Attache in London, the Marquis de la Ferronays, contributes to the "Gaulois" this morning an interesting desription of the new Jesuit College of Sainte Marie, established at Hales Place, near Canterbury. The decree of March, forbidding the Society of Jesus to keep up their scholastic establishments on French territory, obliged the fathers to seek refuge abroad, and their attention was naturally directed towards England, both on account of its accessibility from Paris and its security against any possible religious persecutuion. The extensive pile of buildings known as Hales Place, within scarcely more than two hours journey from Calais, being for sale at the time, the Jesuits were glad to purchase it, and have now installed a college there, under Pere de Gesmaisons. The building is admirably suited to its new purpose, the rooms being large and well ventilated, although more ornamental than is usual in a religious college. The chapel is described as a marvel of tasteful architechture and decoration, enriched with numerous statues of saints, and stained glass windows of great beauty. The college is surrounded by about twenty acres of land.

From Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland).

 

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