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Author Topic: The East and West Kent Yeomanries  (Read 4630 times)

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Offline otis

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2016, 18:49:21 »
The Dunkirk evacuation ended on 4th June 1940. The Lancastria was sunk in a slightly later evacuation on the 17th from St Nazaire.

I found this site with some details of units on board.

http://www.lancastria.org.uk/general-information/#BEF

This lists the 4th and 5th battalions of the Buffs onboard. The 2nd battalion were lifted from Dunkirk itself. Not an issue as soldiers could find themselves attached to other units, or away from their own mob due to illness, wounds, courses etc.
"there was more hit than miss about this arbitrary bombardment"

Offline grandarog

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2016, 10:25:08 »
Tony, you should find all you need on Google, here is one example at random.
https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/units/239/buffs-east-kent-regiment/
 Good Luck Rog.

Offline Tony Francis

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2016, 21:50:31 »
Hi there

Does anyone have any history of the 2nd Battalion The Buffs? My father fought in the second world war and went to France and fought over there until he was evacuated as part of Dunkirk. He was on the Lancastria when it was bombed and was thrown into the sea and never fought again as he had crude oil and sea water in his lungs from that.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2014, 22:58:59 »
Regiment lists for the East and West Kent Yeomanries during the Great War.

http://www.hut-six.co.uk/GreatWar/WestKentYeomanry.html

http://www.hut-six.co.uk/GreatWar/EastKentYeomanry.html

Debe  Ali Farka Touré & Toumani Diabaté

Offline oobydooby

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2014, 20:31:14 »
You may be interested to know that the last member of the "Buffs" passed away in 2010.  Whilst researching my family tree I came across this obituary piece online about my fathers passing. I must admit that when he told me as a child that he was a Buffs I assumed he was in an organisation similar to the Foresters of which he was a member.  After reading the newspaper piece I realised it was to do with the army.

I have just read 101sean's piece "an ungrateful Adolescent" where he mentions a Buff that I thought I should look in the KHF Military section to see if there was a thread on the Buffs before I made any mention to 101sean, hence this reply. 

I hasten to add I will be writing about my father in Life writing shortly and I am afraid it will not make a pretty story.

For now I give you this link to the newspaper article for anyone who has an interest.

http://www.thisiskent.co.uk/War-veteran-loses-battle-cancer/story-11986230-detail/story.html#axzz2lZLRpfHF
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

John38

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2014, 23:24:37 »
We used to call it Casevac in the early days, but, in the RAF it was re-branded as AeroMed

Offline yeoman

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2014, 22:21:12 »
Thanks for posting Yeoman . Forum members may be interested in the link below.
My Father was a proud member of the Waldershare Troop of the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles at the outbreak of WW1.
 When it was decided that Cavalry were not required for trench warfare the troops were disbanded and reassigned to other regiments . My dad became a Lewis Gunner in th Royal West Kent Infantry. You can read in the link how he fared being wounded casevaced and returning to France throughout the War.
They were made of tough country stock in our family and he lived to 90 dying peacefully of old age.in 1986.

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=310797.msg1921202#msg1921202

Thanks - and for sharing the link and pictures: that's a great photo of your Father in REKMR kit.  I assume that was pre-war as I have seen similar studies, often taken at annual camp.  Would it be OK to point it out to the regimental museum?

A skim of the West Kent history shows many were posted to 7 RWK as infantry, which fits in with the Kitchener battalion equipment in the other photos. 

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2014, 13:50:50 »
"casevaced". Hands up those who had to look it up! I certainly did! You learn something every day on KHF.

Offline grandarog

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Re: The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2014, 10:48:50 »
Thanks for posting Yeoman. Forum members may be interested in the link below.
My Father was a proud member of the Waldershare Troop of the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles at the outbreak of WW1.
When it was decided that Cavalry were not required for trench warfare the troops were disbanded and reassigned to other regiments. My dad became a Lewis Gunner in th Royal West Kent Infantry. You can read in the link how he fared being wounded casevaced and returning to France throughout the War.
They were made of tough country stock in our family and he lived to 90 dying peacefully of old age in 1986.

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=310797.msg1921202#msg1921202

Offline yeoman

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The East and West Kent Yeomanries
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2014, 20:21:24 »
The yeomanry were the Territorial Force’s mounted troops.  The experience of the recent Boer War meant that, like all yeomanries, they were organised and trained to fight as mounted infantry rather than cavalry.  In 1914 there were two regiments in Kent.  Both were descendants of units raised in 1794 during the wars against revolutionary France and both had contributed companies of mounted infantry to the Boer War.  When the TF was formed in 1907 both regiments formed part of its South Eastern Mounted Brigade.
The regiments and their drill hall locations were:

Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles

RHQ Canterbury
A Squadron   Chatham
B Squadron   Sittingbourne & Faversham
C Squadron   Dover & Ramsgate
D Squadron   Ashford

West Kent Yeomanry (Queen’s Own)

RHQ   Maidstone
A Squadron   Bromley
B Squadron   Gravesend
C Squadron   Tunbridge Wells
D Squadron   Maidstone

The regiments mobilised for service on 5 August 1914, moving to Canterbury where they trained and provided a mobile force for the South East Defences.  They first saw action in Gallipoli from September 1915, then serving in Egypt and Palestine, ending the war in France.  The regiments were amalgamated on 1 February 1917 and re-roled as infantry to form 10th (East & West Kent Yeomanry) Battalion East Kent Regiment, The Buffs.  They served as such until the battalion’s disbandment on 21 June 1919 when its colour was lodged in Canterbury Cathedral.

War service was extremely varied with the WKY history asking “Which of us reclining in the sun in June 1914 would have thought that in five years he would have been shot at by “Asiatic Annie” in the Dardanelles, that he would have fought a battle under the walls of Jerusalem, that he would have been gassed near Peronne or Lille, or that he would take part in a Royal Review by the king of the Belgians in Brussels?”

The regiments won the following Battle Honours: BAPAUME 1918 - EPEHY - SOMME 1918 - HINDENBURG LINE - PURSUIT TO MONS - FRANCE AND FLANDERS 1918 - EGYPT 1916-67 - PALESTINE 1917-18 - GALLIPOLI 1915 – GAZA

These were displayed on drum banners made in 1920 as light cavalry regiments did not then carry guidons.  The honours are now held by the Kent & Sharpshooters Yeomanry.

Both regiments formed second and third lines (numbered 2/1 and 3/1) to absorb some of the many volunteers.  These were used principally to train drafts for the first line units (now numbered 1/1) and other units, such as the Royal West Kents, and for home defence duties.

The regiments suffered fewer casualties than their counterparts in the infantry, although between August 1914 and February 1917 250 of the WKY alone left the regiment to take commissions, many of whom later became casualties with their new units.  Detachments and disease took a further toll.  At the Armistice only five WKY who had mobilised were still on strength and of the 540 who had sailed for Gallipoli only 2 officers and 63 men were still serving together in November 1918.

 

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