News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's  (Read 46223 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ann

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 420
  • Appreciation 50
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2014, 16:34:13 »
Oh my goodness, what a way to end the last installment, I am on the edge of my seat now!

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2014, 13:09:29 »
Continued.....

After kicking my shins more than a few times we finally calmed my brother Alan down so a teacher and I took him along the corridor to my class.  “I'm here all day so if something’s wrong you'll know where I am,” I told him and we took him to the room which was to be his class.  And that was that, or so I thought.

Did I mention we boys all wore short trousers in those days?  You can imagine the bruises I had from my being kicked. Unfortunately I didn't need to imagine, they were real and they hurt!  During the morning playtime Alan and I sat and talked and played chase, just as brothers did, and I made sure he got back to his classroom.  At dinner time, (it was never called lunch as this was the main meal of the day for kids in those austere times), Alan was nowhere to be seen.  I scanned the dinner hall in the vain hope he had found a friend and had forgotten about me, but all to no avail.

I was upset and worried, not for his safety, after all if he could beat the heck out of me, he could surely look after himself.  I was concerned that he would not get his dinner and would be starving for the rest of the day.  After I had eaten I wandered around the playground in the vain hope of seeing him in the hordes of children running around.

I spent the rest of the day worrying, and walked home after school shaking with fear that mum would belt me for losing Alan.  When I got home there he was, moping because mum has chastised him since she then had to feed him from our meagre larder.

As we went to bed that night I tackled him about why he had run away from school that day.  He replied that mum had told him that he was going to be with me all day and that when she had left him with a lady and been taken into a big room with lots and lots of people and he couldn't see me he panicked.  “But you knew I was there at playtime,” I replied, “why did you run away at dinner time?”

“I missed mum and was a bit scared,” was his reply.  I assured him that he had no need to worry ever again as I would always be there to look after him.  He looked at me with trusting eyes, and at that moment a bond was formed between us, it seemed as if I always knew when he was in trouble and he in turn knew I would come running.  At school we became "those Hayes boys" whilst at play we were almost inseparable.

Our bond remained strong until, sadly, my mid-teens when it was slowly eroded until broken in a most subtle and strange way, a way I still do not understand to this day.
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2014, 13:05:59 »
Thanks for replying Minster boy and Ann, it's good to know my experiences are by no means unique.  Please feel free to add anything, this is a forum after all, not a story book! :)
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

Offline ann

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 420
  • Appreciation 50
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2014, 10:53:50 »
I am of the same vintage era.  In Junior school I was aware that boys were different (not in the physical way, I suspect that came much later) but I did have a 'boyfriend called Keith D..... who took me to the Saturday morning cinema once! They could also be quite nasty. There was one called Edward P.... who chased me round the playground with a worm and put it down the back of my dress.  Ever since can not touch one. Interesting I can recall the 2 boys name instantly and can picture exactly what they looked like.  My 'boyfriend' wore a stiff leather type jacket and he used to march around the playground all stiff pretending to be a robot.  I do remember looking up the word 'sex' in a school dictionary once and being very disappointed it only referred to male and female.


Minsterboy

  • Guest
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2014, 05:55:27 »
Being born in 1947, my school years and experiences mirror those of oobydooby's, apart from the fact that sadly, each of my three schools were boys only as I recall. And just as oobydooby, I don't recall any form of sex education throughout my schooling.
Can't wait for him to get to the teen school years and just after, when we went encountered the Swinging Sixties and got our sex education almost daily.

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2014, 23:09:42 »
Sireneta, you were lucky.  In all my school years I never had any sex education, not even biology.  As you will see when I get to my teen school years.

oobs
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

Sirenetta

  • Guest
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2014, 19:20:51 »
I had the extraordinary experience in about 1952/3 of sitting opposite in reading classes a girl of the same age, 9/10, who was extraordinarily well developed, possibly aided by the fact that she had been made pregnant by a migrant labourer helping to build a new Council Estate in the village.  Like Oobydooby, at that age, I thought girls were the same as boys but dressed differently and could handle the same rough and tumble.  I never really understood why we were cautioned not to punch this girl in the ample chest and not to make remarks about her changing shape...  She had the child I know, but I suspect was shipped off to a place of safety.  I never saw her again in my final year at primary school or ever after.  It was many years later before I understood about the birds and bees, thanks to Biology classes at secondary school....

Offline Horstedfarmerson

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 63
  • Appreciation 5
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2014, 18:17:57 »
Dont know how to say this, without it sounding weird, but my first sexual experience was in an infant school class, help!

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2014, 17:42:09 »
I am not sure how the education authority worked in the sixties, but I do recall that there were two or maybe three intakes every year.  My younger brother, as I have stated earlier was born two years after I, but it was really just one year and five months, I was born in the summer of 1946 and he in early 1948. It was thus that I started school in the autumn term of 1951 and he started in the winter term of 1953.  The other point worth making was that there was very little parental input; neither, as I recall, was there a PTA or board of governors. They were proper schools then!  Parents and busybodies were not generally welcome as once the children were deposited at the gate the teachers became 'in loco parentis’ and that was that.

Children were encouraged to mix during playtime, during classes and assembly, but oddly there were separate doors for the girls and boys to enter the actual School building.  What odd ritual or reason for this was never explained and we boys were left with rumours spread by word of mouth from the older boys which never seemed to ring true.  At our age girls were just variations of, well…boys.  They had long hair, sometimes tied up with ribbons and they wore dresses, the same colour as the boys’ trousers, yet in every other way they were the same.  They kicked, punched, ran and spoke in exactly the same way.

Assembly for me was also an uncomfortable affair as we had to sit cross legged on the hard wooden floor and listen to the head teacher go on about someone who had done something brave or had been good in some way, then being told how we should strive to be good or brave.  These were examples of what we should strive to achieve.  Strive and achieve were words that most five and six year olds had no meaning of so we just assumed it was something we should defer until we were older.  Following this we had to stand to sing a song, ‘Jesus wants me for a sunbeam’ and ‘All things bright and bootyful’ were two that come to mind, then we had to sit on that hard floor again and listen to something else, then stand and say a prayer.  It took me years to learn it was ‘forgive us our trespasses’ and not ‘chiver chuv cheveress,.. Go on just go and listen to 200 odd kids say it and see what I mean!

Anyway, the first day of term and the new intake would be led by a teacher into the hall at the end of assembly and were led to the back until the older kids went to their classes whereupon they were taken to whatever class they were assigned to settle in.  This led to a craning of myriad necks as we turned to see the newbies. Most of the time they were calm and no trouble at all, but not every time.

On one occasion there was much screaming and scuffling from the back.  Of course we all had to look and see what the fuss was.  Several teachers were trying to restrain a whirling dervish who looked oddly familiar to me.  I hunched my shoulders and tried to hide myself behind the boy sitting in front, all to no avail.

“Hayes boy,” boomed the head teacher above the din.  “Go and take care of your brother!”  I wished the floor would swallow me up, as I stood, cheeks as red as ripe cherries, and sheepishly struggled through a sea of upturned faces to the back of the hall.

More soon, hopefully.
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

Offline Lyn L

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1127
  • Appreciation 84
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2014, 15:33:03 »
Yes please oobydooby.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Minsterboy

  • Guest
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2014, 14:31:41 »
Great stuff oobydooby, carry on.

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Re: Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 14:10:47 »
Rainham. 1950-52
I recall very little from my time at Rainham, I remember we lived in a large building converted or shared by more than one family on the High Street, on the same side of the street and just to the East of St. Margaret's Church.  The house is probably no longer there since the only likely house I can find near enough to the Church is an ivy covered building next to R Day repair centre and even that seems too far away.  A quick look on Google Earth confirmed my memory of the way the pavement rose at the approach to the Church.
On the opposite side of the street and further East a side road took us to an infant school, I believe it was Church run and had two entrances, one for girls and one for boys where we used to line up in pairs, boys and girls at their respective doors, when the teacher in charge rang an old brass hand bell to signal school was about to start or playtime was over.  Running down the front of the building was a wrought iron staircase coming down from the first floor which I assume was a fire exit.
At the same time as I was learning to walk I learned how walk on my hands, and my favourite trick was to hand walk up the first flight of steps to the landing of the house and then slide down the polished bannister.  At school I would often start walking up the iron stairs on my hands, much to the consternation of the playground teacher, they were all ladies, who would run up and grab me before I had gone too high.  It eventually got to the stage where they would stay near to the stairs and stop me before I got started, only moving if there seemed to be a problem which demanded immediate attention.  I would then start my hand walk much to the frustration of the teacher.
I was never punished and became known by teachers and pupils alike as "that Hayes boy", even my classmates called me Hayes Boy.  Universal recognition indeed!

Bearing in mind that due to suffering a stroke my memory for names and exact locations is not precise, so if anyone has any input on these matters, it would be most gratefully received.

My next piece will be 'The Screaming Schoolboy'
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

Offline oobydooby

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Appreciation 45
Growing up in the late 40's to the late 60's
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2014, 20:00:59 »
An Introduction
Prompted by an earlier, highly informative thread about how people spent their leisure time in the past, I offered to continue the thread with how I spent my time.  Unfortunately my memory for exact dates is not very good so would add nothing historically. I felt that to add to the thread in question would be wrong and not in keeping with the ethos of this forum or the thread itself.
However, perhaps I may start a thread in the ‘any other’ section detailing a little of how I spent my formative years at school, home and at play, with general dates wherever I am able to remember them.
From an early age, I can recall hop picking with my mother and two brothers, Alan, younger than I by two years and Robert, older by two years.  The only memory is that one night in the communal hut we were told a scary story about headless men with fiery eyes and being scared when a face appeared with eyes, mouth and nose aflame with an eerie inner glow.  This was of course a carved pumpkin, so even though I knew nothing about Hallowe’en, in later years with foresight it was obvious that we were picking during the halloween week.  The year would have been about 1949 or 1950, and Alan was a baby at the time since he was born in 1948.  That was the only time we went hop picking, not because I was so scared to go again, but probably because mum was, or always seemed to be expecting another baby, by my latest count and research I know she had 10 children from at least three possibly four different people, it is not for me to be judgemental on this matter and will only mention it if and when relevant to the memory.
We went hop picking while we lived in Rainham, my first memory as a child, so I shall start at Rainham, then to Gillingham, through my years in care at first Tonbridge in a reception centre and on to the best years of my life in Manston.  From there I will proceed to the confusing years at Herne Bay, then to Dover and finally back to Gillingham until I finally left Kent forever at 20 years of age.
Sorry this has been a bit of a ramble, but I hope you will allow me to continue.

Best wishes, Tony (oobydooby without any uppercase letters please.)
©2014 A Hayes

Astronomers always look into the past.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines