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Author Topic: Postcard from France  (Read 4524 times)

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Offline filmer01

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2014, 17:31:00 »
Further inspection of the far left partial poster - could it be for a tyre?

The postmark ring would leave little room for "Army" and another number, but there is nothing detectable at all - cack handed post office workers....

Will and Hilda do not appear to have had children that I could find. They are only on one public tree on Ancestry, owned from Utah and with few near relatives - shame, I would have liked to found descendants to show it to....

So Base Depot No2 was at Le Havre - that fits, I think - Continental geography and I are distinct strangers  :)

I had assumed ASC - but if this was November 1914, and he is already a Lance Corporal, was he Regular Army or maybe Territorial?
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline grandarog

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2014, 17:20:34 »
Going by the fact he is on a motor bike and has a roundish cap badge it looks pretty certain he was Army Service Corps. ( ASC later RASC).
The ASC in France with the 1914 expeditionary force set up Base Depots 1, 2 & 3 at Le Havre and 4&5 at Rouen.  :)

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2014, 15:59:44 »
The card was sent on the 25th November 1914.
The post mark is an incomplete single ring datestamp in use until January 1915.
When complete it should read Army Post Office (note that the office on one side would be balanced by the missing Army on the other), with the date in the centre.
Under the 14 there should be a number between 5-18. This would be the number of the Post Office.
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

Offline filmer01

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2014, 15:25:18 »
Looks like the Triumph to me, really interesting link, I will revisit it with more time.

As a 16yr old I remember pressing the two halves of a friend's Triumph 200cc Tiger Cub flywheel together when he ran the big end, and truing it up on my lathe with a stick of chalk, a club hammer and lump of wood - looks pretty similar.

The poster info helps, and I've yet to find where no2 Base Depot was so that may also help knit it all together.

Many thanks for your help - keep it coming  :)
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline conan

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2014, 14:18:01 »
I believe the motorcycle to be Triumph 'trusty' thousands were used by despatch riders during the war


http://www.go-faster.com/1914Triumph.html
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2014, 12:26:06 »
The half poster on the left is advertising some unknown product, but pasted over it is a small notice: En vente, Avenue Pastin, Rouen (sold at Avenue Pastin in Rouen).

That could mean the location is in or near Rouen, anyway SW from Paris.

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2014, 12:19:58 »
The poster could be anywhere in France, of course (like Margate would advertise Dreamland in London or Manchester rather than in Margate itself).

Le Havre was also a transit port for cross-channel troop movements in WW1.

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2014, 12:13:28 »
The poster gives prominence to two places: Sainte Adresse and Nice Havrais.

Sainte Adresse is a small seaside resort 2 miles from le Havre, known from paintings by Claude Monet.

Nice Havrais, a residential seaside establishment at Sainte Adresse created by businessman Georges Dufayel. The poster seems to be advertising the resort itself, rather than some event or entertainment. It looks fresh, so maybe early in WW1 rather than late.

Sainte Adresse was the administrative capital of Belgium during WW1, with the exiled Belgian government installed in the Dufayel Building.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sainte-Adresse

The philatelists should help you with the post offices,

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Postcard from France
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2014, 11:47:28 »
That bike looks familiar. A Douglas perhaps. I can't find my book on classic bikes to do a proper identity.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline filmer01

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Postcard from France
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 11:42:16 »
This postcard was sent to my Great Uncle during WW1. There is no date, so maybe some detective work will give some more clues. The Post Office frank says No25 with what could be the faintest ghost of 14 underneath. The belt-drive motorbike may help with dates - any experts here? The posters may also give some info.

The message reads:

L/Cpl W Swift
M-T Base Depot No 2
British Expeditionary Force

Dear A
Excuse dirty pc, but I dropped it. What do you think of it. This is the horse on which I do my work.
Will

He was William Henry Swift, born in Derby 1889 and a Dockyard worker at Chatham (1911 Census). Brief detail has him married in 1918 to Hilda Agnes Miles, born in Deal 1899, her father was a RM sergeant at the time. William died in Chatham 1958, Hilda in 1960. I have not looked for children, although a descendant may be extremely pleased to see the card.

My Great Uncle, Alfred Colyer, also worked in Chatham Dockyard pre WW1 as an engine fitter, and continued all the way through WW2 in Falmouth, dying there in 1950. I have one of his notebooks from 1917-18 from which will I post extracts, although they are quite technical, assessing repair and maintenance works on all manner of ships from Cruisers down.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

 

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