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Author Topic: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII  (Read 8517 times)

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KeithJG

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2017, 12:53:30 »
Here is another:

Offline StuarttheGrant

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2017, 20:54:11 »

 It certainly is a stirring sketch, it captures the spirit of the age and the courage of the local people.
Stuart...

Offline Nemo

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2017, 15:06:15 »
The CWGC site records the 5 people from Gillingham as Mr Thomas Hill and Mrs Florence Edith Hill of 69 Gillingham Road, and Mr William Rufus Thomas and Miss Laura Ann Thomas of 52 Nelson Road; all were buried in Woodlands cemetery.  Mrs Violet Lilian Walters was injured at 50 Nelson Road and died later at St. Bartholomew's hospital.

KeithJG

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2017, 10:33:54 »
Not any information about the bombing but nevertheless Gillingham Bus Station.

As mentioned before my Mother & Father were on the buses during WWII and at the Gillingham Depot. The family house was 19, Duncan Road.

A friend of my Father, a couple of years later, drew this indian ink drawing for him and Ii still have it to this day.

It is signed and dated at the bottom right hand corner and says ....Gosling cannot make out the initials but 24/10/42
must of course been drawn from memory.

One can sense the drama as the chap on the right helps push and save a bus from the flames.

Jonathan S

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2012, 21:08:20 »
Many thanks Peter.  All information helps.

Regards,

Jonathan S

Offline peterchall

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2012, 20:15:27 »
From ‘Front Line County’ by Andrew Rootes:
“The most serious raid in the county so far occurred at 1.10am on 18th July when bombs fell in the Napier Road area of Gillingham.

One woman was blown out of bed into a fireplace, although without injury, and a baby was buried under some debris but dug out unhurt. A part-time air-raid warden of eighteen, who was also a local Scout leader, lay for more than four hours after worming his way into a ruined house to cover the faces of a man and woman trapped in the wreckage. He protected them from showers of dust which fell with every movement of the rescue-squad behind him. He chatted to the couple cheerfully for that time, and when they were finally rescued  he collapsed with exhaustion. He was later awarded the OBE Gallantry Medal and the Silver Cross of the Scouts for his heroism.

Rescuers worked from 1.30am – 6am to free three people trapped altogether. Among the 5 people killed in that raid were a couple who had returned to their bed from their shelter. 4 people were also seriously injured in the attack and 22 slightly hurt, including 12 children”.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Jonathan S

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2012, 18:11:09 »
Bombs caused damage to Gillingham bus station twice during the Blitz.  The second raid of 27/28th Aug 1940 is well known and has been discussed on this Forum.

My interest is the first raid – that occurred circa 01:10 on 18th July 1940.

Mr and Mrs Thomas of 52 Nelson Road were killed, as were Mr and Mrs Hill of 69 Gillingham Road, from the same stick of bombs – I think a stick of 6. Another bomb damaged Napier Road school and another destroyed 116 Napier Road where Ron Cox lived – he has left a brief account at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/45/a4389645.shtml

Does anyone have any knowledge of this raid or are you aware of the existence of photographs of the damage or where the two couples were buried?

Many thanks in advance for any help rendered.

Jonathan S

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2010, 00:56:55 »
My grandfather, Bob Lewis, was a bus driver living in Gillingham at this the time of the raid (I'm not sure if he was a M&D driver or not). As he lived quite close (the top end of Toronto Road) he was called in to help with rescuing the busses from the fire. Sadly he died in 1980 and I only recently found out he was there that night.

Another pic of the damage


(Larger versions here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/22124479@N03/5002797798/in/set-72157624857451095/)

Offline peterchall

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2010, 23:20:03 »
Today, or rather, early this morning, was the 70th anniversary of this event.

The 'Daily Telegraph' 'flashback' reproduction states that it had been London's longest air raid alert, with one or two planes at a time coming over for 6 hours, believed to be intended to keep the population awake and disrupt production. Very few bombs were dropped and London cinemas and theatres continued their programmes, and restaurants and dance halls stayed open. Berlin had an air raid alert, but according to local correspondents no planes or gunfire was heard.

What actually happened?
According to 'The Narrow Margin' bombs were dropped on Bournemouth and Coventry, and about 50 aircraft raided Plymouth; the decoy airfield for St Eval airfield in Cornwall was heavily bombed, and 6 other RAF airfields were attacked without effect. Wot - no Gillingham!?

'The Bomber Command War Diaries' state that 99 RAF bombers attacked Hannover, Leipzig, Leuna, and Nordhausen. 1 lost. 11 Whitleys attacked Turin and Milan. 2 lost.
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DoverDan

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2010, 18:26:11 »

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2010, 19:23:05 »
What a terrible night it must have been.
I have very recently found out that my husbands half brother ( neither families knowing of a 2nd marriage or any children from either ) was  badly injured in that nights attack. He was 2 yrs old and lost part of a leg, his Grandmother died later that day in St Barts from her injuries. They were living in Beatty Avenue.
Just this last Saturday we have met my husbands ' half ' niece and her husband and both sides are now finding out about each other.  It certainly wasn't a wonderful time for anyone was it. Sadly her Mum passed away in 1992 without finding she had half brothers and sister.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline peterchall

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2010, 17:43:46 »
I've just found this thread while doing a bit of 'nosing'.

This incident occurred just after midnight on 27th August 1940, when 50 of 120 buses were destroyed. Staff, servicemen, and civilians tried to save the buses but were hampered, not only by the heat, but also because their steering wheels had been locked in accordance with anti-invasion regulations and only two of the staff had keys. The buses that were saved were parked all round local streets and had to be searched for next morning; nevertheless a service of sorts was provided from early morning onwards. A more or less normal service was provided on the 29th, using a motley collection of buses from all over SE England.

There was other damage elsewhere in the town - A Co-op Store, newsagent, sub-post office, and a butcher's were hit. 20 people were killed (including 3 of the M&D staff) and 40 injured.

From ?Front Line County? by A. Rootes.
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Offline WildWeasel

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2009, 21:38:43 »
Excellent !!
My maternal Grandfather Alfred Tricker served in the last days of WW1 and WW2 as a Royal Marine
Having seen active service he ended up ( I suspect due to his age ) stationed in Brompton during the later stages of the war
The family lived in Rock avenue then Shakespeare Road in Gillingham so he would walk back home across the Lines from Chatham
Apparently he realized that Gillingham bus station had glass roof panels so would present an attractive target to any overflying German Bombers
He wrote a letter to the managers of the bus station pointing out the problem which they chose to Ignore..... Look what happened.....r />
I never knew him as he passed away in 1958 5 years before I was born....His DNA is in me & I am so proud of that !!!!

RIP Alf Tricker......

WW
If it's too hard I can't do it !

Offline afsrochester

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Re: Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2009, 18:08:33 »
I knew a fireman who attended this "shout" the late Claud Evernden BEM of Gillingham Borough Fire Brigade who related a couple of stories about it to me. He told me they had to stop trying to get the buses out as the heat and smoke were so intense. So bad it was,  that the water jets from the hoses were evaporating before they hit the fire itself. Claud was also responsible for getting the EWS by the petrol station built.

Offline kyn

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Gillingham Bus Depot WWII
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2008, 18:22:35 »

 

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