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Author Topic: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 703. Cliffe  (Read 2770 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 703. Cliffe
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2014, 20:34:11 »
Are you referring to the Dummy Airfield which was on the Cliffe Marshes?

No.
Pastscape gives the location of Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 703 as TQ 716 788, and Airfield Bombing Decoy Q96A as TQ 72915 77233, about 1 and a 1/4 miles to the southeast.
The recent English Heritage report on the Curtiss and Harvey explosives factory also differentiates between the two sites. (Vol 1, page 37).
Padstow May Song Lisa Knapp

Offline gardener

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Re: Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 703. Cliffe
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2014, 20:06:23 »
Are you referring to the Dummy Airfield which was on the Cliffe Marshes? The exact position is known and markers remain in the marsh. It is not on publicly accessible land. The actual lights were on the old jetty and cardboard planes arrived which disintegrated on the wet marshland. 
Many oral exist of the site and also Sir Alan Herbert wrote about it (commander of Water Gypsy). This gentleman was the only non commissioned MP to serve in the Royal Navy in WWII. He introduced no fault divorce laws and was at supper with Churchill the night before war was declared. Churchill stated the Thames was expendable but Sir Alan did not agree and took his totally unsuitable little boat to war.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Naval Coast Bombing Decoy 703. Cliffe
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2014, 23:23:33 »
A decoy for a decoy.

A Second World War bombing decoy at Lower Hope Point, Cliffe. It was built as part of the Naval Coast decoys for Nore Command to deflect bombing from a system of coastal loading points known as 'hards'. The decoys were commissioned as part of Operation Fortitude South in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. This was a 'QL' decoy, which was designed to simulate the sparse lighting and small cluster of buildings found at the landing craft 'hards'. The Naval Coast 'QL' decoys were constructed between April and May 1943 with the basic features of a 'QL', essentially the shelter and the fittings for the lights. The electrical equipment was to be fitted at a date nearer to the invasion, which led the Naval Coast decoys to become known as Mobile 'QLs' (or 'MQLs').
Lower Hope Point was one of four bombing decoy sites for Nore Command.
The other three being:-
Decoy 700. Kirton Suffolk.
Decoy 701. Long Reach Suffolk.
Decoy 702. Steeple Essex.
The site could not be identified amongst the extensive earthwork and structural remains of the Cliffe explosives factory when the area was surveyed from aerial photographs as part of the English Heritage: Hoo Peninsula Landscape Project. This could be due to the scale of the features and quality of the photographs. The decoy may well have utilised existing buildings and structures from the decomissioned industrial site.

For more see: http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1470211

Operation Fortitude http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=15738.0
Padstow May Song Lisa Knapp

 

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