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Author Topic: Brennan Fish Torpedo  (Read 1924 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Brennan Fish Torpedo
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2014, 09:58:53 »
English Mechanic World of Science: No. 904 – July 21, 1882.

Brennan’s Torpedo.

This torpedo has been in process of manufacture and improvement for some considerable time at Melbourne, partly under the auspices and with the assistance of the Victorian Government.  The invention has been patented in England and the colonies, but it was not considered politic to exhibit it as the late Melbourne Exhibition, pending the negotiations with the British Government.  It is difficult to convey a clear idea of such a machine as a locomotive torpedo to the general reader without the aid of sketches; but compared with the Whitehead, Flume, or the Woolwich Royal Laboratory patterns, the Brennan is simplicity itself.  Its motive power is not compressed air, neither is it contained in the body of the torpedo.  To propel the weapon through the water at a speed of from 13 knots to 20 knots an hour for 1,000 yards, a separate engine, or at least a special connection with an existing one, is necessary.  This engine drives two drums, about 3ft in diameter, with a velocity at their peripheries of 100ft. per second.  Their duty is to wind in two fine steel wires No.18 gauge, the same as used in the deep sea sounding apparatus of Sir William Thomson.  The rapid uncoiling of these wires from two small corresponding reels is the belly of the fish imparts to them, as may readily be conceived, an extremely high velocity.  The reels are connected with the shafts of the two propellers which drive the torpedo through the water.  The propellers work, as has long been known to be necessary to insure straight running, in opposite directions and both in one line, the shaft of one being hollow and containing the shaft of the other.  At first sight it would seem as if hauling a torpedo backward by two wires was a sufficiently curious way of speeding it “full speed ahead,” but it is found in practice that the amount of “drag” is so small, as compared with the power utilised in spinning the reels that give motion to the propellers, that it may be left out of calculation altogether.  The steering-gear of the Brennan is a most ingenious contrivance, whereby the relative velocities of the two driving drums, and consequently of the two propellers, can be varied at any moment.  The perpendicular rudder, which is marvellously sensitive, is reacted on by the screws, and in this way the torpedo may be made to follow as torturous a path as a figure-skater.  The course the torpedo is taking is indicated to the operator by a slight steel telescope mast carrying a pennon, which, when not in use, is folded along the back of the torpedo.

John38

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Re: Brennan Fish Torpedo
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2014, 13:10:30 »
I just love old documents like this, many thanks

Offline kyn

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Brennan Fish Torpedo
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2014, 08:54:09 »











 

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