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Author Topic: Nuclear Crane  (Read 4976 times)

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Offline Longpockets

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2014, 19:19:37 »
The Refuelling Crane, more popularly known as the 'hammer head crane'................... The crane was used to lift heavy loads and to service the two nuclear submarine docks. It had cost 280,000 and took nine months to erect. It weighed 1,500 tons (1,524 tonnes) and stood 160 feet (48.76m) high.

http://www.thedockyard.co.uk/documents/1/ZZ_1163759628_Nuclear%20Submarine%20Refitting%201970-1983%20Continued.pdf


Offline conan

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2014, 13:44:58 »
According to this site:
http://www.ingenia.org.uk/ingenia/articles.aspx?Index=536
The similar hammerhead crane at Devonport for the same purpose was by Stothert & Pitt. Maybe the Chatham one was too?

Thanks for that link,I actually drive a taxi in Bath and drive past the old Stothart and Pitts works nearly every day.
Here's a link to a picture of an earlier crane being built at the works

http://www.bathintime.co.uk/image/199885/victoria-bridge-and-view-across-to-the-assembly-of-a-titan-crane-stothert-&-pitt-works-c-1922

The other big makers of hammerheads were Arrols of Glasgow who amongst other things built the Forth bridge,but I can find no reference to the Chatham crane anywhere.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline ChrisExiledFromStrood

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2014, 19:10:41 »
According to this site:
http://www.ingenia.org.uk/ingenia/articles.aspx?Index=536
The similar hammerhead crane at Devonport for the same purpose was by Stothert & Pitt. Maybe the Chatham one was too?


Offline conan

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2014, 13:48:25 »
Having been, in the past, a crane driver I'm always fascinated by them. Would love to have had a drive of this beauty. Does anyone have any idea who built it to start with?
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline cliveh

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2014, 09:04:54 »
From the Medway Archives:

cliveh

Offline StuarttheGrant

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Re: Nuclear Crane
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2014, 20:18:59 »
Wow what a beast, I assume it is for putting the reactors in Nuke subs?
 Going by the "flask wagon" on the dockside.
Stuart...

Offline kyn

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Nuclear Crane
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2014, 00:04:48 »
A photo of the a model in the Dockyard Museum.

 

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