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Author Topic: WWI Tanks in Kent  (Read 52882 times)

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Offline unfairytale

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #42 on: November 29, 2009, 11:18:27 »
Although this picture has nothing to do with Kent. It shows how easy it is to move a tank. :) Taken in 1917.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline LenP

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #41 on: November 26, 2009, 20:42:32 »
That Deal pic is fantastic!

Offline kyn

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #40 on: November 26, 2009, 08:28:07 »
Two more nice pictures, thanks.  I didn't think there were that many around, when we started this thread it seemed to take ages to get any pictures up!

Offline unfairytale

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2009, 22:59:34 »

The Deal tank pictured in 1923.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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underwhere

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2009, 12:37:24 »
Here's the Tonbridge tank on 29th July 1919. It was later parked to the north of Tonbridge Castle gatehouse. It is not there now. Photo from "Around Tonbridge in Old Photographs" by Charlie Bell.

Offline LenP

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #37 on: November 14, 2009, 23:56:41 »


The presentation of the Canterbury tank occured on 19th July 1919 to celebrate the 'Great Peace Day'. Although this was celebrated throughout East Kent, it seems the Canterbury tank was presented earlier than some of the others, notably Faversham, Rochester and Ashford.

"Throughout East Kent on 19th July 1919 there was a very full programme of festivities arranged including childrens sports, firework displays and the chain of beacon bonfires, all to celebrate the 'Great Peace Day'. The events arranged in Canterbury were fairly numerous, with the military giving valuable help to the 'Council Peace Celebration Committee'. The major event commenced at noon with a procession by the Mayor and Corporation from the Guildhall to the Dane John Moat to officially receive the tank from Major General Sir Colin MacKenzie. The tank which had been placed in the moat the previous day,was presented by the National War Savings Committee in recognition of the city's financial assistance, nearly 250,000 given during the war. In the photograph taken from the Dane John Terrace by John G. Charlton can be seen the Mayor and Mayoress Bremner, Sheriff Pentecost and Aldermen Pope and Wiltshire. This picteresque ceremony was watched with obvious interest by some thousands of citizens assembled on the upper Dane John Terrace, in the Rhodaus Town thoroughfare and in the moat itself. A guard of honour was formed by fifty soldiers from the Buffs, bearing their decorated lances, whilst a guard was also provided by a contingent from the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. The band of the 1st Battalion the Buffs was also in attendance."

Picture and text from 'Canterbury in old Picture Postcards Volume 1' by Terry Hougham, published by the European Library, 1987.

Offline kyn

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #36 on: November 13, 2009, 17:20:42 »
These have just been passed onto me from KEEPWATCH who found them at the Guidhall Museum Rochester.


And what lovely ones they are too!

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #35 on: November 06, 2009, 10:14:38 »
A quick checklist of War Savings presentation tanks in Kent.
Does anyone know of any more?
Ashford              mark iv
Canterbury        mk iii
Chatham    
Deal                   mk iv    served in France.
Farningham        mk iv
Faversham         mk iv    served in France.    Thanks, LenP,Kyn.
Folkestone         mk iv    served in France.
Hythe                 mk iv  
Maidstone          mk iii
Rochester           mk iii?
Tonbridge           mk iv    served in France.
Tunbridge Wells
For a discussion on the Ashford tank. http://www.activeboard.com/forum.spark?aBID=63528&p=3&topicID=29466387
Maidstone, Canterbury. http://www.activeboard.com/forum.spark?aBID=63528&p=3&topicID=11185428
HMS Pembroke had one presented to it by the Tank Corps in recognition of the Chatham Gunnery School training the tank crews in the use of the naval guns that were fitted to the tanks. The Portsmouth Gunnery School tank is now displayed in the Tank Musuem. The Chatham one was scrapped!

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #34 on: November 05, 2009, 21:53:41 »
Here is a further image I found of the Rochester Tank in the Castle gardens with members of the band of the Royal Berkshire Regiment.


Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2009, 19:51:36 »
The Faversham tank may well have seen action, the rails over the top , used to prevent the unditching beam catching on the top of the tank, were only fitted once the tank was in France.
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

Offline grandarog

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2009, 15:39:13 »
Thats the one that legend says is buried in the recreation ground !!!
First pic going along road by Water Tower.
Second outside station Last cant see where  looks like rec. where it was located then.

Heres a bit cribbed from the Faversham Society News Letter Nov 2007.



THE REC TANK some people still remember, and
others ask about it. It came to Faversham in
recognition of the town's sterling National Savings
efforts during World War 1. 264 other towns in
England and Wales were similarly rewarded. The
experts tell us it was a 'female' tank, whatever this
means - the mind boggles. It arrived by rail from
Bovington Camp and was then driven by a Tank Corps
crew down Newton Road and along East Street to its
final resting place at the SW corner of the Rec,
discharging an impressive if unhealthy exhaust in the
process. The impression was given by the National
War Savings Committee that it had seen active service,
but if it bore scars, learner-drivers rather than enemy
action were probably to blame - most of the tanks had
been used only for training purposes. It was
eventually scrapped, like all the others, bar one - the
one at Ashford, which survived only because the local
electricity undertaking used it to house a transformer.

Source;_ Faversham Society News Letter Nov 2007.



Offline kyn

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2009, 09:06:06 »
They are from a bygone kent book that was found at a bootfair  :)

Offline LenP

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2009, 20:36:20 »
Superb!
Thanks Kyn.
I've changed my mind again - it wasn't hearsay!

Offline kyn

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #29 on: October 27, 2009, 13:41:08 »
Faversham tank  :)


Offline kyn

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Re: WWI Tanks in Kent
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2009, 20:03:35 »
The tank was officially presented to the city by Maj-Gen, Sir H Mullaly.


Major General Herbert Mullaly in The Times

Saturday 15 August 1908 (Honours)

Indian Frontier Operations

The King has been pleased to make the following promotions in and appointments to the Orders of the Star in India and the Indian Empire in connexion with the recent operations against the Zakka Khel and Mohmands:-
C.S.I.
Colonel (Brigadier-General) Herbert Mullaly, C.B.

Tuesday 13 October 1908 (Court Circular)

To be a Companion:- Brigadier-General Herbert Mullaly, for services in connexion with the operations against the Zakka Khel and Mohmunds.
Wednesday 01 May 1918 (Court Circular)
On arrival Their Majesties were received by the Mayor and the Town Clerk of Chatham, the Mayor and Town Clerk of Gillingham, Admiral Sir Doveton Sturdee, Bt. (Commander-in-Chief at the Nore), and Staff, and Major-General Sir Herbert Mullaly and Staff.

Friday 01 December 1922

Major General Sir Herbert Mullaly, surveying the vital Eastern problem, begs Greater Britain to live up to its faith in peace and good will, especially with the Turks and our Moslem fellow-subjects, and to refrain from offending them and their religious principles.
Tuesday 18 March 1924 (Court Circular)
Major General Sir Herbert Mullaly is staying at Potifino, Italy.

Monday 13 June 1932

Obituaries

Major General Sir Herbert  Mullaly, late R.E., died at La Tour de Peilz, Switzerland, on June 9, at the age of 72.
The son of Mr. John Mullaly, of the Honourable East India Company's Service, he was educated privately, and joined the Royal Engineers from Woolwich in 1878.  His first active service was as field engineer with the Chin-Lushai Expedition, 1889-90, when he was mentioned in dispatches.  In 1895 he was officiating assistant secretary of the Military Department, India, D.A.A.G. for R.E., and secretary of the Defence Committee, India, and in 1896 he was appointed D.A.Q.M.G. for Mobilization, India.  In the South African War, 1899-1900, he served as D.A.A.G., being present at Lombard's Kop, the defence of Ladysmith, and other operations.  He was severely wounded and mentioned four times, and received his brevet of lieutenant-colonel and four clasps.
After his return to India he was in 1902-3 officiating deputy secretary, Military Department, India, and was then D.Q.M.G., and in charge of mobilization, India, till 1906, when he was appointed Director of Military Operations in India, a post which he held till 1910.  He was made C.B. in 1905.  In 1908 he officiated as Chief of Staff with the Bazar Valley field Force and the Zakka Khel Expedition, and was again mentioned and created C.S.I.  He commanded a brigade from 1910 to 1913.  In the Great War he commanded a division and the East coast Defences, and was mentioned twice and created K.C.M.G. in 1917.  He retired on an Indian pension in 1920.
Sir Herbert Mullaly married, in 1883, Mabel, daughter of the late Mr. Hastings Read, I.C.S.; she died in 1924.

 

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