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Author Topic: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O  (Read 13606 times)

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Offline peterchall

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Re: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2014, 19:49:01 »
CDP, I thought you would be inundated with requests for ‘Memory Jerkers’ - they all look interesting. So time for the two missed from the list so far, please:
”and beer French Rugby Team.
West Indies Cricket team Ray Lindwall”

It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline CDP

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Re: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2014, 11:23:22 »
I think that I posted this before. Ah !, I may have just located it. Very poor photos.
The MALOJA was called the largest up and downer in the world.
The diameter was 108", we would climb inside the cylinder to clean and check.
There were 4 cylinders, 1HP, 2LP's and 1IP.
It also had a Baur wach generator fed from the LP exhaust.
It also had a generator built around the prop. shaft to save energy, not used, dismantled.

The Engine room of the Maloja  b) looking on top of the hp cylider and a) looking at the valve gear. My friend is shown to compare the size.
The photos were taken with a Brownie Box Camera, approximately 1950, I hope that they are " lookable"!!


http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9137.0

The Strathaid was a Turbo Electric and the Stratheden was just a straight Turbine, if my memory serves me correctly, as they say.
A junior engineer was very unfortunate because his pulse kept in time with the revs. per minute of the main engine, 80 RPM most of the journey. This was very noticeable when we approached a port and changed the engine speed.
 Doctors were unable to help. He left the sea after one trip !!!!!
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2014, 22:07:07 »
I would guess that the Recip with the turbine meant that, like the Titanic and sisters, you had a low pressure exhaust turbine on the centre shaft. Were they three or four cylinder triples or quad expansion? The Oracle was Cunard.. 'nuff said. I really do understand the Engineering bits, as will Howard for sure. Just bring it on please, I find this fascinating.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline CDP

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Re: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2014, 12:48:50 »
Ships carry boats               (as in lifeboats )
But boats can't carry  ships

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Obviously a shortened version below

The ships Deck Officers and Engineering Officers often/nearly always, had a girl friend in the First Class and a girlfriend in the Tourist section .
On this particular trip we had as passengers about 100+ sailors returning to England after a 1 year posting on a smallish island with no female company at all and when they saw the £10 Poms (as they were called) they went ballistic These sailors had loads of back pay etc and THEY were buying the passengers drinks.

Although we were very friendly with these sailors we were glad when the 6 week journey back to England was over and life returned to normal.




The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2014, 08:02:28 »
Difference between a ship and a boat.??
A mariner acquaintance told me “Ships we are, boats we carry”. Is that right?

Most of the others look intriguing. Let’s start with:
British sailors on islands for one year, no shore leave.

It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline CDP

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Working ?1949 TO 1954 in the P & O
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2014, 03:22:13 »
If anyone is interested in my " memory jerkers " at the end of this article, just ask.

My adventures as a P & O Engineer.

I completed my apprenticeship at Sheerness Royal Dockyard, 28th August,1949 and joined the P & O as an Engineer Officer on 29th August, 1949. My idea at that time was to see the world at someone else’s expense and I eventually left the P & O as a Third Engineer in complete  charge of the watch.
 In 1954, having served on RMS Strathaid, a straight turbine engine, the RMS Stratheden, a turbo-electric engine and the RMS Maloja, a reciprocating engine with a Baur Wacht turbine with a cylinder diameter of 108” and a generator built around the propeller shaft which had been removed.
 I was born in 1928 and the Government said that because our Education had been so disrupted by the war that our year was to be exempt from National Service and the Home Guard.
I wonder if Dr.Diesel, who invented the diesel engine and was mysteriously lost(?) overboard, had not been so killed(?), would the Diesel Engine be more popular than it is today?
Altogether I made 13 trips to Australia (and back!), I suppose equivalent roughly to 13 times around the world, stopping at Suez, Bombay, Colombo, Freemantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and, on occasions, France and Italy, but never once did I meet Captain Neptune, I was either on watch or hiding in my cabin behind locked doors.
On these large passenger liners we would carry a Chief Engineer, one Second Engineer, three Fours, three Thirds, 6 Junior Engineers,  6 electricians and three Refrigeration Engineers with the watch or duty system of 4 hours on watch and 8 hours off, 4 to 8, 8 to 12, 12 to 4. On one trip I was getting 4 hours sleep per day, there were too many parties. During rough weather, fog approaching or leaving port, we were required to work 2 hours before our watch and 2 hours after the watch, this was very trying. On one trip we were called before our watch as we were approaching Australia and we waited ages and rung the bridge to enquire what was happening and the reply was “ Sorry, but we have lost Australia, we can’t find it“.
An interesting fact was that the cost of fuel oil in Aden was the same as water in London. The Egyptians then charged duty on the oil being loaded and also charged extra for open decks. The P & O then installed removable shutters to enclose these decks.
As we carried the Royal Mail to Australia, it must be carried on the fastest ship and, at times, a smaller boat would approach us very fast, slow down to run alongside us and then it would shoot ahead under cover of darkness, not being able to show it was faster than us.
When the ship was passing between Sheerness and Southend, I would always slow the pumps that supply the air to enable the fuel to burn properly and release three large puffs of thick black smoke in the air to let my future wife know that we were on our way. At sea we were not allowed to make black smoke as the smuts went all over the passengers sunbathing on the top deck. On one trip the bridge rung down to the engine room and the third engineer answered the phone, the Captain said “Cloughton, will you please stop smoking“, to which Cloughton said “ sorry“ and dropped his cigarette and stamped on it!
I was very short of sleep on one trip so I volunteered for the 8 to 12 watch which nobody liked because that was when the parties were best. When I came off watch I would have a shower and then go to the night watchman and have a cold beer. there would always be a few passengers and we always had a laugh and a joke.One day I was walking along the deck with the Chief Engineer and I stopped to talk to one of my late night drinking pals, when we left the Chief said to me "do you know who that is?" and I said "my drinking friend" .He then replied and said he is Menzies the Australian Prime Minister. I was on deck with Menzies when we arrived in Freemantle with the boats all decked out with signs such as “Go back Menzies” and “We don’t want you here“, etc. We both had a good laugh at that…

MEMORY JERKERS
Recip, turbine, turbo-electric explain each !!
Difference between a ship and a boat.??
and beer French Rugby Team.
West Indies Cricket team Ray Lindwall.
British sailors on islands for one year, no shore leave.
Queers Wilson twins.
Collision with Steel Age.
Bar chits thrown overboard.
Difference in the ships leaving UK to Aussie streamers band etc
Steward hoses down shoreside passengers.
Orcades and Len Parsons and caviar.
D.T.s. eating lino.
Stabbing of Junior Engineer.
Jessie Mathews.
Burl Ives.
Stowaway and Sharks.
Alan Guinn and shore bar.
Ray Watson as stowaway.
Lifeboat sailed to Southend.
Three ships Strath, Aird and even and Maloja.
Himalaya.
Chasing Whales.
Boiler burst, planks alight.
Nuns and Paddy.
Hello you old bast.
Pukaki and Tutara in Melbourne.
Ship sunk in dry dock.
Flood victim there/back London.
Paddy and his gun u.c.force.
Hitch hiking in Aussie.
Strikes in Aussie, break open one packing case, carry message, toilet seats, whiskey.
Emergency button at dance with Alan Guinn.
Gin 3/-, squash 3/- a bottle.
Stromboli and friend.
Bottle gin /day and 200 cigs /week.
Different girl friends, blondes, with child, old one, young ones.
No decorations at all in room.
Dr when we require jabs. Lost records.
Catholic priest on board for Lourdes.
Boil on leg +gin.
2nd Eng a right one, sheet over his head, worked us every day esp day and half.
Black market gold, gems, etc.
Luna park – too wet on tight rope.
Funeral at sea.
2nd Engineer and time off.
serang and tindall 10% to serang.
TV sets but no electricity.
One in 1st class and one in 2nd.
Hurricane at sea Cocoas Islands.
Gun running friend, off ship by stretcher after 3 days, Raja`s wife in dining room samples food.
Stowaway transferred at night.
Migrants buy at Aden, sell later.
Straights of Messina.
Stomboli.
Table tennis ok - snooker ??
Flying fish landed on a steward`s bare stomach whilst asleep.
Paddy and nun.
My torn shirt.
Women overboard, search ship.
Bum boats in Port Said.
Menzies go home.
Maloja to scrapyard & lifeboat kitted out.
Souvenirs, Maloja spoons, desk set, etc.
Left sea and return to work, paid stamp.
Amount of leave, me, no shifts in London.
Engineers pulse in time with the engines.
Harry Smith engagement off.
Ernie Foster wedding.
Hitchhiking in Aussie, no fires allowed.
Menu and food.

The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

 

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