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Author Topic: Evacuated to Wales 1940  (Read 5181 times)

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Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2019, 22:09:45 »
Wow, that is incredible Dave. To have kept in touch for over seventy years, well done
DTT

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2019, 13:41:07 »
I did reply to this a month or so ago but it wasn't recorded. So, try again! I was an 8 year old at Barnsole Road School when we were evacuated, complete with name label, gas mask & small suit case, to Herne Bay on 2nd September 1939.Train from Gillingham. Some mothers came with us as " helpers" & were also billeted in H.B. No families at that time. Donald Obrey & self were with a family at 8, New Street. Nice people, poor but grafters. He drove a lorry & distributed coal & coke for the Gas Board. She worked as a cleaner in a hotel & the daughter- about 16 also worked there as a maid. They also had 2 boys, one 7 one 11. We never had butter, just margarine so I had bread & jam! I kept in touch ever after until the daughter died 3 years ago. They never ever heard from Donald O.- nowt so strange as folk! .We shared the local school, mornings one week, afternoons the next. The reason why we, of the Medway towns, initially went " local"- my friend at the County School went to Sandwich- was because of the number of " Military" targets; Dockyard, Shorts- Airport & Seaplane Works, HMS Pembroke, Royal Marines barracks, Royal Engineers ditto, etc.You can imagine how much we enjoyed the freedom of half day schooling- which caught up with us later!  After the " phoney war", when France had fallen, our school re-evacuated to Bargoed in S. Wales- The County S. to Rhymney- where they stayed for the next couple of years. Because it was too far for my parents to travel, I went to live with an aunt in Shepperton, Middx.coming back home in July 1942.   

Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2019, 12:12:23 »
A further thought on Herne Bay during the war,  there were several very young families in our street and my brother (then early teens) once said that there was a cadre of friends of a similar age. There was not such a wholesale evacuation  of families for the duration as happened, as I understand it, in Margate.

Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2019, 14:45:46 »
Rather think `evacuation` policy changed according to the perceived threat, initially away from the assumed invasion zone, then London, etc, once the Blitz started. But I don`t think it was compulsorily at any time. Several branches of my family were in Gravesend at the outbreak of war but my mother was on holiday in Herne Bay with her parents who were looking at retiring there. With an onslaught of bombing expected at any minute, my father said `stay put` and a little later joined her and they took a house. With a 10 and a 6 year old, the question of their evacuation  arose and Pembrokeshire was mentioned. I believe some HB children did go to West Wales but the story was that my mother heard that the first bombs had been dropped on Pembroke Dock and said "I`ll take my chances"!  She had to take billeted soldiers but was still of an age when she could have been drafted for war work, which would have seen the children sent away, and so decided to have me in 1942. We therefore remained together as a family for the duration.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2019, 10:06:16 »
Smiffy,I was evacuated from Rochester much later in the war,reason for our evacuation ,I was told,was the onset of the V1(doodlebug) attacks,not certain of dates but certainly late1944/early 45.
I ended up in Pickering Yorkshire,with a family named Berryman,I remember the best thing ,was after years of rationing,being on a small holding,the abundance of food was amazing,hams ,chicken,rabbit,
Plus unlimited quantities of vegetables.AND no SCHOOLS.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2019, 13:50:09 »
Hi AlanH,

I was assuming that this would have been in 1940, hence my comment. I wasn't aware that evacuations were still taking place so late in the war, which proves even a barely functional KHF can still be worth visiting!

Offline AlanH

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2019, 09:57:07 »
Hi Smiffy. Apparently Fighter Command had by 1944 taken control of the air space over much of the north which had because of the steel mills etc. been heavily targeted by the Germans. This made the Medway area with the dockyard and factories along the river better targets.
Mum and I were only moved to another address in Sheffield, not another town. I had to prove this to a very vocal Yorky years ago who was astonished when I showed him the card....  and he never paid up with the carton of beer I'd bet him if I was telling the truth. :)
AlanH.


Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2019, 00:04:35 »

I've still got the old ID Card given to everyone in those war time days and I treasure it and keep it safe.
AlanH.
[/quote]


I too still have my original identity card and number, issued when I was born during the war. It has always amused me that this still remains everyones NHS number to this day. Nonetheless when it was suggested that we have EU style identity cards a few years back - which would have saved passports and made policing easier - it was totally rejected as `un-English` to become a number!

Offline smiffy

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2019, 15:12:45 »
Sheffield seems like a really dangerous place for anyone to have been evacuated to, seeing as it was a prime target for the Luftwaffe. It got plastered during the Blitz, so it was quite right that you and your mother were taken elsewhere.

Offline AlanH

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2019, 10:08:03 »
Actually I'm not sure if I should post here at all as I can't remember a thing about being evacuated. But both my elder sister and brother were sent to other places (possible Cornwall), names of which escape me and Mum and me got sent to Sheffield.
First place we went to turned out to be a brothel....... when Mum realised what was happening, with men coming and going at all hours of the day and night, she rushed outside and stopped a car which luckily was being driven by a local doctor. He immediately arranged for both of us (I was only 3 months old) to be taken to a proper evacuees place for however long it was we were there.
I've still got the old ID Card given to everyone in those war time days and I treasure it and keep it safe.
AlanH.

Offline lutonman1

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2018, 03:38:16 »
I went to Glencoe Road school in Chatham, first evacuation, Gillingham, Rainham, then Newington, where we trooped off. We, my brother and I, were billeted in Church Lane with an old Bargee. After several months we came back with the school, then in June / July, by train again to Neath in South Wales, then by bus to Pontardawe, 10 miles north of Swansea. We stayed for one year, my brother learnt Welsh very quickly, even sang songs in Welsh. we were parted in Pontardawe, I went to Ynysmeudu, one mile east, my brother went to Clydach three miles west of Pontardawe. We only met once, before we came home.
MoK

Offline conan

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2018, 22:55:26 »
Regarding the old method of counting, my son now lives in Cumbria and says that they still use the local dialect number words.

Try this link (I especially like the number 15 in most of them :) )

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yan_Tan_Tethera
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2018, 20:15:31 »
lutonman 1. Which school did you go to & where were you evacuated to the first time & then where in Wales (the 2nd time?). Presumably " up the valleys"? My friend who went with his brother's school, Gillingham County, ended up with the local pastor at Rhymney & had to learn several hymns & psalms & never missed church/chapel on Sundays - so you got off lightly!

Offline lutonman1

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Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2018, 19:13:00 »
I notice some lads learned Welsh up to ten. I went a bit  further and learnt up to twenty, for those lads here is what they sounded like in english.
1----een
2 ---dye
3 ---tree
4 ---pedwell
5----pimp
6 ---wearth
7--- sythe
8----oyth
9 ---na
10 -deg
11--ean-a-deg
12--di-a-deg
13 -tree-a-deg
14 -pedwell-a-deg
15 -pump-theg
16 -ena-pump-theg
17 -di -a -pump-theg
18 -orth-a-pump-theg
19 -na-a- pump-theg
20 -egan

Thats how they sounded to me. With an apology.to the Welsh people.
MoK

Offline peterchall

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  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Evacuated to Wales 1940
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2015, 18:17:55 »
   The Government then decided that those born in 1928 and I think 1929?  were to be exempt from  the National Service.......
Those born in 1929, as I was, were not exempt from National Service..
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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