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Author Topic: WWII Bombs  (Read 8323 times)

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Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2015, 19:20:39 »
Signals99, Why do people find the need to take away people's pleasure in posting here, I hope you ignore that email as I`m sure I speak for all of us when I say we enjoy coming to our forum to find things we may not be able to find and also we enjoy the posts of others. I am very grateful for any information I find here as I have this great thirst for knowledge about our local past history.
Can I say thank you here and now for all the information members have posted here as I have had great times telling my children and grandchildren about the different types of bombs etc that were used during the war. Thank you everyone.

***I am still the child within***

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2015, 14:50:31 »
We can all find most of what we want on the internet, but what a dull way to do it. Like you, I enjoy the ‘discussion’ of the forum and if it was not for the interaction with real people there would be no incentive to look things up anyway. Tell whoever e-mailed you to mind their own business!

Now back to topic :)

Hear hear - you carry on asking Signals99!
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline peterchall

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  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2015, 12:57:28 »
We can all find most of what we want on the internet, but what a dull way to do it. Like you, I enjoy the ‘discussion’ of the forum and if it was not for the interaction with real people there would be no incentive to look things up anyway. Tell whoever e-mailed you to mind their own business!

Now back to topic :)
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Signals99

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2015, 11:47:58 »
Hi, I have received an e mail, it more or less told me "why do I post questions in the forum when I could find most of the answers on the Internet".  Fair comment I suppose!
Most of my answers come about through interaction with posts on the forum and I happen to like it that way, I see you all as unseen freinds.
I don't get back to the towns these days, travelling is a real pain, due to health reasons .but you gals and guys keep me in touch plus I enjoy the nostalgia, Troy Town was my stamping ground 1941-1960.
Yes, I supose I am a bit of an attention seeker, so be it, love you all and will continue to post.

Offline peterchall

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  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2015, 11:30:29 »
Another addition to Rochester- bred’s list of things falling from the skies is the explosive incendiary. A proportion of the standard 1kg stick incendiary was fitted with an explosive charge that went off about a couple of minutes after impact, with enough force to kill anyone close enough to be trying to extinguish the bomb. Obviously intended to deter anyone from trying to do that, and it worked for my mother!

We had a shower of incendiaries over Troy Town one evening, evidenced by a clattering noise. Mum and I went outside to see what it was – the menfolk were in the Morden Arms – to find the place lit up like daylight and one of the bombs on the lawn. Mum grabbed the sandbag that we were obliged by law to have handy while I, fearless as ever, shouted to her “mind it’s not an explosive one”. Whereupon she threw the sandbag – and missed! – and we both went down the cellar. The men came home from the pub and Dad and an uncle got involved with a group putting out one lodged in the roof of the builder’s offices a couple of doors away.

Here is the film that was shown in cinemas regarding butterfly bombs:
http://www.theguardian.com/uk/the-northerner/2013/jun/21/butterfly-bombs-luftwaffe-cleethorpes-grimsby

I don’t think any were dropped on Kent, but note the last paragraph of the accompanying text. An RAF Bomb Disposal Officer was killed by one in 1956 and a man was killed by one in Malta in 1981. I read somewhere of a man taking one into a police station just a few years ago – the wings had jammed and not fully unwound, so the bomb was not armed!
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Signals99

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2015, 23:53:31 »
Great stuff HERB COLLECTOR! How good to see it again and in a much better condition than I remember it.
Now I wonder if we can find the seconalised V II that stood in bomb alley in the EOD museum :)??????

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2015, 22:37:17 »
The Fort Clarence manned V1 (Reichenberg IV) is now fully restored at the Lashenden Air War Museum.
http://headcornaerodrome.co.uk/wac/2013 WAC Spring Newsletter.pdf
You will need to scroll down towards the end with two photos further down.
I Wish It Would Rain The Temptations

Offline peterchall

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2015, 20:26:52 »
It seems to have been the other way round – it was Hitler who wanted them used as manned attack aircraft.

With regard to the small cockpit, I’m amazed to find there were 2-seater versions!

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fieseler_Fi_103R_Reichenberg
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline doug

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2015, 19:28:26 »
Piloted V1 rockets were a later development, the idea a piloted version to be aimed at a target by the pilot, the story goes that Hitler would not sanction the type going in to use because nobody could be sure that the pilot would have a change of bailing out.

Offline peterchall

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2015, 18:07:38 »
A remarkable woman, even if she was a Nazi. Off-topic, so see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanna_Reitsch
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Signals99

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2015, 16:31:11 »
peterchall, many thanks for that, I knew i wasn't as stupid as I look. Yes, as you say, my recollections of the cockpit was it was just aft of the wing trailing edge and about 1m in front of the motor pylon, she must have been  very small. I once saw a lad of about five or six actually get in the cockpit during an "open day", it was tight for him let alone a grown women.

Offline peterchall

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2015, 15:41:11 »
Signal99, you are quite right. There was a piloted version of the V-1, although the reason for it is not clear – some versions say that it was to enable stability problems to be solved by using a human pilot, others that it was to set up a unit of suicide pilots on the lines of the Japanese Kamikaze units.

What is certain is that it was test flown by Hanna Reisch, probably chosen because of her small size. She was involved in an attempt to rescue Nazi leaders from the Berlin bunker in a Fiesler Storch while under Russian shell fire, and the only woman to be awarded the Iron Cross, 1st Class.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Signals99

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2015, 14:14:09 »
Hi, peterchall! That was a good summing up of WWII German Bomb types, thank you.
I note your reference to the Fiesler F103 or doodlebug, as a point of interest I recall a version of this at 'Bomb Alley Lodge Hill Camp' that was fitted with a basic cockpit, joy stick and ailerons plus rudder, again I think it went to the TA centre at Fort Clarence. .
I have, on many occasions been ridiculed, often being told the fuselage was far to small to hold a pilot, but I remember it well, the story was it had been brought back from Peenamunde after WWII.

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2015, 10:08:03 »
Thank you all so much, I now have lots to tell my children, as my oldest said to me she feels so much is lost on younger people these days about what went on during the war that she also wants to be able to pass things down showing what brave people there were who not only signed up during the war to save our country but also the people at home just as much as brave living through it. Thank you.
***I am still the child within***

Offline peterchall

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Re: WWII Bombs
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2015, 08:39:43 »
The German’s name for the bombs are in the link provided by HERB COLLECTOR, but that is not how we knew them.

The most common High Explosive bomb was probably the General Purpose SC250 (250kg = 550lb).

To us ‘incendiaries’ were the thermite sticks which were scattered in their 100’s over an area. The large 'FLAM Liquid Incendiaries’ in the link were ‘oil bombs’ to us.

What we called ‘land mines’ were naval magnetic or acoustic mines dropped by parachute and which exploded if they fell on land.

The most fearsome was the V-1 flying bomb, (Officially the Fiesler Fi103) or ‘Doodlebug’. With manned aircraft raids there were intervals (hours during the Battle of Britain, days during mid-war) when there was no alert and we could relax. But those inhuman things came in a continuous stream, making their presence known by that awesome noise.

The V-2’s were at first reported by the media as ‘gas main explosions’, before the government admitted their existence. There were only 3 or 4 near the Medway Towns and to us they were just ‘Rockets’

A nasty little beast was the ‘Butterfly` Bomb, about the size of a coffee mug with wings, that dropped without exploding but would then explode at the lightest touch. I don’t think any dropped in Kent, but we were warned about them in films and other media.

To complete the list of ‘nasties’, although having no particular name, there was shelling from guns on the French coast. It mainly affected the Folkestone-Dover-Deal area, but shells fell near Rainham on at least one occasion, and a woman was killed by a shell in Maidstone in June 1944.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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