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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #40 on: January 13, 2012, 19:09:02 »
A couple of photos of Prior's Gate in the 19th century. (Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum www.re-museum.co.uk)

1856


1860s
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Offline rochester1

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #39 on: January 13, 2012, 14:34:36 »
With regard to; Rochester Gates and Anns excellent article, I would like to mention one of the most popular and most photographed gates in the 'City'. This is, as recorded by the well known historian Edwin Harris; 'The gate with four names.' That is to say the arch with a dwelling above on Rochester High Street which leads to Rochester Cathedral.  In modern times the most popular of the names is College Gate; a name which will be found on many postcards, or Jaspers Gate. The true name though is Chertseys Gate as recorded in Kelly's.

Chertseys Gate. This name came from a local gentleman Edward Chertsey who took part in what has become to be known as 'Jack Cades Rebellion' of 1450. The patent roll of Henry V1 contains the names of many hundreds of Cades followers (or John Mortimer as he was also known) among which is Chertsey. Edmund of Rochester; the same of Headcorn. The rebellion came to an end when Cades followers quarrelled over the plunder.
'Cade fled but was taken at Heathfield in Sussex when his body was brought to the council. His head was struck from his body which was quartered.One quarter was sent to Blackheath, a second to Norwich, a third to Salisbury and the fourth to Gloucester. The quarters of one of his followers named Nocholas Jakes, were sent to Chichester, Rochester, Portsmouth and Colchester.'
On Cades flight the Lord Chancellor went to Rochester; 'for the tranquility andgood government of the King, and for the seizure of certain goods.' There was £105-15-00 in cash, and goods produced anothr £274- 8-4 out of which~
£40 was given to the citizens and bailiffs of Rochester to make the East Gate of that city toward Canterbury.

College Gate. When HenryV111 dissolved the Monastry of St Andrew which was collegiate as well as parochial, he refounded  the college under the name King Henry V111 Grammer School. To reach the college it was necessary to pass under Chertseys Gate via what is now College Yard. The Gate thereafter took the name of College Gate.

Cemetery Gate. Because it led to the burial ground of St Andrews Priory.

Jaspers Gate. Charles Dickens immortalised this Gatehouse in his unfinished novel; The Mystery of Edwin Drood.
within which book was the character John Jasper. Dickens  described it thus;
'They all three look towards an old stone Gatehouse crossing the Close with an arched thorouhfare passing beneath it. Through the window a fire shines out upon the fast darkening scene, involving in shadow the pendant masses of ivy and creeper covering the buildings front. As the deep  Cathedral bell strikes the hour, a ripple of wind goes through these at their distance, like the ripple of the solemn sound that hums through tomb and tower, broken niche and defaced statue, in the pile close at hand.'
'Is Mr Jaspers nephew with him?' The Dean asks.
'No Sir' replied the Verger, 'but expected. Theres his own solitary shadow between the two windows-this one looking this way- the other looking down into the High Street- drawing his own curtains now.'

A mention of this gatehouse would not be complete without a mention of the Bakers oven door which can be found set into the wall under the arch. It was put there in the later part of the nineteenth century when Rochester Corporation made an order that every home in the city was required to have a brick diustbin in the backyard. Obviously this gatehouse had no backyard to build one in and therefore a chute was built from the dwelling above for the disposal of ashes and suchlike and to hold it back an oven door was purchased or purloined.
Rochester was then as now, a tourist destination, and tourists are shall we say; inquisitive! Many a person would see the door and wonder why it was there. On opening it they would find out! A day spent covered in the detritus of a household was not to be recommended. It is welded up now so you will be OK. Take a look next time you're in town.





Offline kyn

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #38 on: January 13, 2012, 14:13:54 »
The keep is open, it could be that when it was mentioned it was closed for repairs or something?  LewisE has been dragged up it many times :)

seafordpete

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #37 on: January 13, 2012, 13:47:02 »
It was open in 1952-3ish, I can remember going there

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #36 on: January 13, 2012, 13:26:42 »
Fred the Needle,

The keep is currently open under the management of EH via Medway Council. Not sure how long it has been open as a structure but I have lived in the area for about 23 years and to my knowledge it has always been so. There are others on the forum who are more knowledgeable on this than me, I am sure they will advise you. It is currently under threat of colapse due to it not having a roof which allows the full force of the elements to play havoc with it, such a shame. It would be a magnificent place to visit if were possible to install floors and roof, one only has to see the keep at Dover to see what can be achieved if those who have charge of it had the MONEY ( same old thing these days ) and the where with all to take the restoration through. It is such an important piece of architectural history that it should not be lost.

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Fred the Needle

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #35 on: January 13, 2012, 10:30:12 »
I really liked my day in Rochester  :)

The top of the tower was the best bit of the castle.

Pardon me for asking, but I left Kent in 1989 and I thought the Keep had been declared unsafe since then so people couldn't go up it.  Does that mean that I was given duff info or that it's been repaired?

I have NEVER been up the keep in my life - one of the disadvantages of having lived so near it for 35 years  :)

Offline Far away

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #34 on: January 13, 2012, 09:03:25 »
Is that the remains of the monument in the second 1948 picture, a stumpy looking thing?

And my question is - is there still a monument to the pigs?

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2012, 11:39:25 »
The monument was for Queen Victoria's jubilee in 1887,  The memorial was sited near the top of the steps from the Esplanade. It was a very ornate memorial though sadly it was made of very soft stone which succumbed rapidly to erosian by rain, frost. etc. By the Second World War very little remained of it. The last time I have heard of it being seen was in the 1950s , so after slowly crumbling away it must of been removed .
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Offline ann

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2012, 10:16:57 »


Postcard dated 1918.  The sender writes that she saw some men swimming in the Medway!
Anyone know what happened to the monument on the left?

kevin payne

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2011, 21:35:10 »
hi ann,thats very interesting,thankyou for that.

Offline ann

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #30 on: November 27, 2011, 18:36:47 »
Taken from History of County of Kent by WH Ireland 1830

In 1225 the great ditch about this city is reported to have been begun, and in 1284 Solomon de Roffa had the kingís licence to build about and on the walls of Rochester, and to hold the buildings for free.
The city has no gates at present but the names of several are on record, viz. Broadgate afterwards called Eastgate, which stood in the high street, a great part having remained in the reign  of Henry VIII when Leland wrote, by whom it  is styled a marvellous strong gate, who adds that no more gates appeared than were commonly used.  Southgate was near Bully hill, on the road to St Margaretís, the arch of which was taken down in 1770. there was another gate as appears by the Registrum Roffense, called Childegate which seems to have been in the north wall of the city, lading to the marshes, that part of the wall being called from it Childegate wall, and the lane in which it stood, opposite the college gate, Chidegate lane.  In the Textus Roffenis there is also mention made of a gate beyond the bridge.

Offline LewisE

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #29 on: March 01, 2011, 18:12:52 »
I really liked my day in Rochester  :)

The top of the tower was the best bit of the castle.

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2011, 20:42:09 »
This is how Rochester Castle was rebuilt down here in llanharran South Wales for the film Ironclad

http://ironcladfilm.blogspot.com/
  Wonder how it will match up with the real thing

Offline kyn

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2011, 20:08:58 »
Some photos after a visit yesterday with my son  :)



















Offline Leofwine

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Re: Rochester Castle
« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2011, 19:03:58 »
There are some great old pictures of Rochester Castle from the 1860s in the Royal Engineers' Library.

Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum http://www.re-museum.co.uk


Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum http://www.re-museum.co.uk


Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum http://www.re-museum.co.uk
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