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Author Topic: Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915  (Read 2431 times)

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Offline conan

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Oh well,some you win.... :)
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Airship

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A bit more about the raid, but sadly no photograph.

http://www.iancastlezeppelin.co.uk/13-sept-1915/4587635272

Hi Conan

Actually that's my website!

Ian

Offline conan

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A bit more about the raid, but sadly no photograph.

http://www.iancastlezeppelin.co.uk/13-sept-1915/4587635272
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Airship

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I was wondering, does anyone have a photograph of Agnes Robins - the first person in Britain killed by a bomb dropped from an aeroplane - grave in Margate cemetery?

Many thanks

Ian

Having just re-read my post, I think I should clarify. It is a photo of Agnes Robin`s grave I am looking for.
Many thanks
Ian

Offline alkhamhills

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Agnes E Robins

1911 Census :-
At 26 Godwin Rd, Cliftonville, Margate
Born 1875 Cleveland Ohio, United States of America (British by parentage)
Living with Aunt Annie Robins (born about 1853 Margate)
Agnes was an assistant to her Aunt who was a Lodging House Keeper

In 1901 with Annie’s parents George & Elizabeth. At 17 Trinity xx, Margate. George a Mariner
 Annie a lodging House Keeper with Agnes E as Assistant,

Offline Airship

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I was wondering, does anyone have a photograph of Agnes Robins - the first person in Britain killed by a bomb dropped from an aeroplane - grave in Margate cemetery?

Many thanks

Ian

Offline peterchall

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  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2015, 08:05:25 »
Great - many thanks :)
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2015, 22:54:01 »
Any idea how big the bombs were? My guess is no more than 10lb (5kg) each.

A selection of smaller German WW1 bombs. 4 high explosive, 1 incendiary, lower right. The 4.5kg to 20kg HE had a cast iron body with a steel tipped nose, cylindrical stabilizing fin and a propeller activated tail fuse. They tended to oscillate when dropped and drift with the wind.

Offline conan

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Re: Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2015, 19:14:29 »
Thanks for the link Herb Collector,that made fascinating reading.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline peterchall

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Re: Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2015, 18:26:40 »
Any idea how big the bombs were? My guess is no more than 10lb (5kg) each.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Hit and Run Raid on Margate by Single Aeroplane. 13th September 1915
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2015, 17:30:56 »
Two killed. Six injured. £500 damage.

On 13th September, 1915 a single floatplane of Seeflierger Abteilung No. 1, type unknown, crossed the coast near Cliftonville at around 18.00hrs. A bright speck hovering high in the air on a sunny cloudless evening, the machine at first attracted little attention beyond one of admiration.
When the ten bombs started to fall it was too late to seek shelter. Five of the bombs fell upon the sands and cliffs in full view of those enjoying the September sunshine on the sea front.
Two bombs fell on the sands, while another fell near Newgate Gapway on the cliffs. One fell upon the lawn of the Queen's Highcliffe Hotel, and another to the left of the main entrance to the Oval Arena.
A sixth bomb fell into the garden of No.4 Eastern Esplanade. Apart from smashing windows, these bombs caused little damage.

Three bombs fell in Godwin Road. One fell outside No.2, where 4 year old Alice Wilson, standing on the garden path with her mother, was injured on the thigh, foot and finger by bomb splinters. Another bomb landed on the rear of No.14 Godwin Road where two female visitors, Gladys Hazlittand and Florence Meager, were having tea in the first floor front room. Both were injured.
The ninth bomb exploded in the garden of Malabar House. Miss Agnes Robins, aged 40, a lodging house keeper of 26 Godwin Road, was fatally injured by bomb splinters while standing at her front door. She died on the 15th September 1915 and is buried at Margate Cemetery, the first person in Britain to be killed by a bomb dropped from an aeroplane.

The final bomb landed in Albion Road. Miss Kate C Bonny, age 27, of Brookyn Lodge, Albion Road, was standing at the garden gate in expectation of the arrival of her parents from London, when the bomb exploded at her feet. When Mr. and Mrs. Bonny arrived only a few minutes later, they found their daughter pitifully mangled by bomb splinters. She died on the 17th September and is buried at Ramsgate Jewish Cemetery.
A nurse, Dora Andrews, 51, standing holding a child in the front garden of 'The Nook' was injured in the shoulder by a flying splinter.
Mr. Walter May, 38, driving his cab along Albion Road, saw his horse literally blown up before his eyes. Both he and his passenger escaped comparatively uninjured. Another horse nearby died of fright.

Above adapted, with corrections and additions, from 'Thanet's Raid History', published by the Thanet Advertiser 1919, pages 4 and 5. http://www.janetandrichardsgenealogy.co.uk/thanet's%20raid%20history.html

There were two defence sorties, both of B.E.2Cs, Nos. 980 and 982, flying from RNAS Westgate. They caught sight of the raider but were unable to close with him.


 

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