News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Rochester Traffic System.  (Read 4321 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2015, 15:32:46 »
Certainly the beacons in the photos have very thin poles with no sign of provision for a fuse box, such as. the bigger diameter base with access door that modern ones have.

Yet they were called Belisha Beacons from the start.

The fuse could of been in the beacon part itself along with the bulb but in any case there were always access covers by traffic lights or whatever in the pavement.

If you look at the Google SV you will see the covers in the pavement which is still there in the previous B&W photo next to one of the beacons.

The later CTV pole with the sign on must be a direct replacement for the older beacon as it is in line with the old pavement in Kings Head Lane/Boley Hill.

The other cover may of supplied electrics to the now gone Police phone which is in the B&W picture also.

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2015, 12:17:59 »
A 1907 OS map shows that what is now Corporation Street was ‘The Common’ from the bridge to the Blue Boar Lane Car Park, where it turned towards the High Street and became ‘Free School Lane’. There was no road beyond ‘The Common’, along the line of what is now Corporation Street towards Star Hill.

So when was that part of Corporation Street laid down? There was obviously no one-way traffic in the High Street before then, and I would place a bet that it was introduced when Corporation Street was completed.

Apart from someone knowing definitely, what clues are there as to when that was?

•   The flats opposite the car park and those further on towards Star Hill look late-1930’ish(?). My mother lived in one of them in 1970 and I thought there was a date plaque on the wall, but I can’t remember what it was, nor does it show in Google SV.
•   A new police station was being built where there is now a big block of flats almost opposite the Casino. It was about half finished when the war began in September 1939 and work was discontinued and it never was finished. How long does it take to half-finish a building of that size?

Of course it doesn’t mean that the buildings were begun as soon as the road was finished, but I imagine it would not be too long after. Does that all support 1935 as the most likely date for the start of the one-way system?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2015, 20:53:50 »
Certainly the beacons in the photos have very thin poles with no sign of provision for a fuse box, such as. the bigger diameter base with access door that modern ones have.

Yet they were called Belisha Beacons from the start.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline GP

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 157
  • Appreciation 11
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2015, 19:47:39 »
If my memory is correct they initially showed a steady light, not a flashing one as of now. Can anyone remember?

From my childhood memory, I thought that Belisha beacons did not have any light  inside. Just a round ball on the post!

The flashing light was a later development.

Online conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 994
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2015, 13:16:51 »
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2015, 08:21:47 »
Just to clarify, pedestrian crossings pre-dated Belisha Beacons, which were an addition to make the crossing more visible.

If my memory is correct they initially showed a steady light, not a flashing one as of now. Can anyone remember?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2015, 16:23:56 »
Thanks KeithJG. Trams stopped running on 30th September 1930 and your earlier photo showing the Titan bus looks summery and the tram lines have gone, so that dates it 1931 at the earliest, and there is still two-way traffic.

As stated earlier, I first lived in Rochester (as distinct from being born in my grandparent’s house there) from March 1935, so the first of your two photos above seems to knock on the head me remembering the one-way system being installed – unless it happened during the summer of 1935. The first of those two photos above, giving prominence to the traffic sign, could suggest that.

I know it’s stretching my memory a bit – I was only 6 in 1935 – but that now seems to me to be the most likely date, with any time back to 1931 being a possibility.

Note the crossing marked only by studs in the road in the second photo above.

Note also that in 1938 the street lights were still suspended above the middle of the road. Their replacement by mercury-vapour lamps is something I do remember, but was it in 1939 or post-war?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2015, 18:30:22 »
I have these two pictures in my collection which i have had for years  and in the first one with the No Waiting sign facing the bridge is 1935 and the other picture you can see the rear of the same sign which is 1938 and one way traffic.

So now we know that the changeover must of happened between 1930 and 1935 ?

Also your Belisha Beacons in both pictures ?

merc

  • Guest
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2015, 12:42:44 »
You could try the Gazette. There might be a notice about it in there...

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2015, 12:24:21 »
Thanks. It proves the one-way system didn’t start with the going of the trams.

A new memory has come to my mind – the installation of Belisha Beacons to mark pedestrian crossings, and I think the first of those that I saw was at the Star Hill end of the High Street. According to Wikwpedia Belisha Beacons were authorised by Act of Parliament in 1934, although those in Rochester may not have been installed until later.

Another factor us the street lights. The photo at Reply#5 shows them to be mercury-vapour lamps – those giving a blue light – and again I think I remember those being installed pre-war.

Is it reasonable to assume that all those developments occurred at the same time? My gut-feeling is still that it was c1935 to 1937.

Where else can we look?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2015, 12:35:53 »
Trying to help with this and this picture by Couchman narrows things a bit as the bus coming towards us must be after 1930 as it is a Leyland TDl. That is the date they were first introduced by Maidstone & District.

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2015, 10:55:32 »
Yep, I think you are right, Smiler.

I have two memories that support my belief that it was one way before the war. One is seeing a bus go from the left lane to the right lane to pass some parked vehicles just as a car was overtaking it in the right lane – very vague but probably the first traffic accident I ever saw, and I know I was a kid at the time. A stronger memory is that I know Corporation Street was one-way from the bridge to Star Hill when I went to Rochester Tech School, 1941 to 1944, and I’m sure that the High Street was one-way in the opposite direction.

That still doesn’t answer the question of when it actually went one-way, of course, and for that I can only rely on a gut feeling that it was about 1936’ish.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 946
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2015, 05:16:34 »
I would make this photo  a bit later than that peterchall as that first car looks like a Ford Pilot to me which were not made until after the war.

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2015, 21:30:12 »
This photo from the Couchman Collection is dated c.1931 but from the cars I woud date it about 1938 – any other opinions?

It confirms that the High Street was one-way before the war, but not when it began.

http://cityark.medway.gov.uk/query/results/?Mode=ShowImg&Img=/cityark/Scans/Unofficial_or_Privately_Originated_Collections/DE0402_Couchman_ephemera_and_MSS_/DE0402_04.html/DE402_4_08L.jpg

Acompnying text reads:
Postcard photograph of Rochester High Street entitled High Street, Rochester looking east from the bridge end of the High Street, showing north and south street frontages, buildings from left to right including White Hart public house and Medway Conservancy Board offices of the (north side) and Bull Hotel, J.H. Springett antique dealer’s and Miss Ketteringham’s confectionery shop (south side). Motor cars and vans are parked along the south side, all facing camera, and foot passengers comprising groups of children and adults are visible on both sides. Published by Shoesmith and Etheridge Ltd., Hastings, Sussex. [A loose note by Couchman stated that on 3 January 1906 the Rochester City Council Works Committee approved the rebuilding of the White Hart (plan ref. RCA/BP/1872) for Messrs. Meux, brewers.] c.1931 p.8 (L)
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Rochester Traffic System.
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2015, 18:54:33 »
I lived in Longley Road, Rochester from March 1935 to late 1937/early 1938 and think I remember it being put into effect during that time.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines