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Author Topic: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey  (Read 5317 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2015, 22:10:16 »
     HMT Sheppey, Naval trawler.
     Built by Cook, Welton & Gemmill (Beverley) Holmes. Launched 1-4-1942, ex Raasay. Scrapped 1959.

HM Trawler Sheppey. The Sheppey was in the Mediterranean in 1943-44. On the 9 December 1943 the Sheppey rescued the crew and passengers of the torpedoed troopship Cap Padaran.

© IWM (F 9742) HMT Sheppey (T292) underway. This vessel, commissioned on 16 September 1942, was intended to be called HMT Raasay but the name was changed prior to commissioning.

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Re: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2014, 22:13:58 »
On the 9th of September, at daylight, the British hired cutter Sheerness, of eight 4-pounders and 30 men and boys, commanded by Lieutenant Henry Rowed, having the look-out on the French fleet in Brest harbour, observed, close in-shore, two chasse-marees (a unarmed French commercial sailing vessel) stealing towards the port. Sending a boat, with seven men and the mate, to cut off one, the Sheerness herself proceeded in chase of the other, then nearly five miles distant, and close under a battery about nine miles to the eastward of Bec du Raz. At 10 a.m. it fell calm, and the only mode of pursuing the enemy was by a small boat suspended at the stern of the Sheerness, and which with difficulty would contain five men. Lieutenant Rowed acquainted the crew with his determination to proceed in this boat, and called for four volunteers to accompany him. Immediately John Marks the boatswain and three others, came forward; and the boat with her five put off from the cutter, in chase of the chasse-maree, then about four miles off, and, by the aid of her sweeps, nearing shore very fast.

After the boat had pulled for two hours, the chasse-maree was seen to run on shore under the above mentioned battery, which stood within a stone's throw of the beach. Notwithstanding this, and that there were 30 French soldiers drawn up on the beach to protect the vessel, Lieutenant Rowed continued his pursuit; and, as he and his four followers laid the French chasse-maree on board on one side, her crew deserted her on the other. It was then that the soldiers opened a heavy fire of musketry upon the British, who had just commenced the cable, and were using other means to get the vessel afloat. In order that the French soldiers might not see how to point their pieces, the British seamen, although there was not a breath of wind, hoisted the foresail; but of which the halliards, almost at the same moment, were shot away. Fortunately for the enterprising crew now on board the chasse-maree, the tide was flowing and aided their exertions; the vessel got off, and the boat commenced towing her from the shore. Fortunately, also, not a men of the five was hurt, although, as afterwards counted, 40 musket-balls, intended for them, had lodged in the side and the two masts of the chasse-maree.

Scarcely had the prize been towed a third of a mile, when a French boat, containing an officer and nine men, armed with muskets, and who had pulled up in the wake of the vessel unobserved by the boat ahead of her, suddenly made her appearance alongside. In an instant, and without waiting for any orders, John Marks, the boatswain, dropping his oar, and neglecting to take any kind of weapon in his hand, leaped from the boat on board the chasse-maree; and, running to the side close off which the French boat lay, stood, in a menacing attitude, unarmed as he was, for at least half a minute, until his four companions, with a supply of muskets and ammunition, and who could only quit their ticklish boat one at a time, got to his assistance. If not astonishment at the sight, it must have been a generous impulse, that prevented the Frenchmen from shooting or sabring the brave boatswain; for they were, it seems, near enough to the vessel's side, to have done the latter.
Seeing that Lieutenant Rowed and his four men were determined to defend their prize, the French boat, after a feeble attempt to get possession, sheered off, the soldiers in her keeping up, for a short time, as they receded from the vessel, an ineffectual fire of musketry. The battery also opened a fire upon the chasse-maree as she was towing off; but it proved equally harmless with that from the soldiers, both on the beach and in the boat.

The capture of two unarmed chasse-marees (for the mate had taken his prize without any difficulty) would, indeed, be a trifling occurrence, were it not for the circumstances under which one of them had been boarded and brought off; circumstances that ennoble the act, and rank it above many which are blazoned in the Gazette, and yield to the parties both praise and promotion: The navy-list shows, that Lieutenant Rowed gained no step in his profession; indeed it was not, as the same document proves, until nearly ten years afterwards, that he was made a commander. As to the boatswain, he, it appears, on account of the very station he filled, and, by every account, so well filled, was, according to the etiquette of the service, excluded from the reward of promotion. It was only, therefore, from the Patriotic Fund at Lloyd's, that he could receive some testimony of the high opinion entertained of his services. Lieutenant Rowed himself made the application, founding it on the inability of the admiralty, without violating precedent, to provide for the "poor fellow; and who," adds his commander, and where was there a better judge? "exclusive of his bravery, is a very good character." The committee, it is believed, presented Mr Marks with a handsome sum of money. Acts like this of Lieutenant Rowed and his four men (the names of all of whom we would record, did we know them) deserve to be made public, if only for the example they hold out, not of adequate reward certainly, but of the impunity which often accompanies the most hazardous attacks. Let him, therefore, who is disposed to calculate the chances of personal risk that may attend the enterprise in which he is called upon to embark, reflect upon the 49 musket-balls which were aimed at, yet missed, Lieutenant Rowed and the four gallant fellows who were on board of this captured French chasse-maree.


From the Naval History of Great Britain 1793-1827, Vol III by William James, published 1837.

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Re: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2014, 22:25:06 »
Queenborough. 'Q' class destroyer.
Built Swan Hunter, launched 16-1-1942.
To Australian Navy -10-1945. HMAS Queenborough.
Broken up 1975. Pity.
60 photos of HMAS Queenborough.
Part one 40 photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/41311545@N05/6684005275/in/photostream
Part two 20 photos https://www.flickr.com/photos/41311545@N05/6684173157/in/photostream

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Re: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2013, 14:22:50 »

Sheerness. 5th rate. 44 guns,
Built by Adams, Bucklers Hard, launched 16-7-1787. Wrecked 7-1-1805 near Trincomalee.


"The Ceylon Government Gazette gives the following account of the fortunate capture of the Alfred French privateer of 14 guns and 73 men, from the Mauritius in December last.

The Alfred first appeared in fight
(5 May 1804) to the southward of Galle, shewing English Colours.-She was then steering to the N.W. but shortly after altered her course and stood directly for the Sheerness-Captain Lind had suspected her from the first, and therefore seeing her superiority in point of falling, got all ports in, and his half ports above, and by keeping his course and disfiguring the ship in every way, he deceived the Privateer so completely, that taking her for an Indiaman, they came boldly down with the intention to board, and actually fired into the Sheerness, who returned a few guns; but finding he still attempted to escape, tho almost under the guns, the Sheerness was obliged to fire nearly a broadside into her, by which two men were killed and six wounded.
This is a most fortunate Capture, for had they not been deceived by the Sheerness, they would have stood to the Northward and most probably taken the Glory last night, a task which, manned & commanded as the Privateer was, she was fully equal to. Too much praise cannot therefore be given to Captain Lind for his most masterly manoeuvre."


The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Sunday 4 November 1804.

Minsterboy

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Re: HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2012, 06:11:46 »
Also, I do believe that one of the tugs currently working out of Sheerness is called the Svitzer Harty.

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HM Ships Queenborough, Sheerness and Sheppey
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2012, 23:19:46 »
HM Ships and boats that have borne the names of places on Sheppey.
Click on ships name for more details (if available.)

Queenborough.  Yacht.  4 guns.
 Launched Chatham DY 1671. Rebuilt Sheerness 1710. Sold 11-7-1777.

    Sheerness. Smack. 2 guns.
      Launched Chatham 1673. Sunk 24-4-1695 as foundation at Sheerness.

Sheerness. 5th rate. 32 guns.
Launched Sheerness 1691. Rebuilt Deptford 1731 as 6th rate. Sold 5-6-1744.

        Sheerness. Dockyard supply hoy.
          Launched Chatham DY -4-1691. Renamed Sheerness Waterboat in 1722. Broken up 1747.
          As there was no water supply at Sheerness, water had to be brought in barrels from Chatham.

Queenborough. 6th rate. 24 guns.
Launched Sheerness DY 1694. Rebuilt Portsmouth DY 1709. Sold 20-8-1719.

        Sheerness. Waterboat and dockyard hoy.
          Built Sheerness 1698. Broken up 1723?

Queenborough. 5th rate. 44 guns.
Launched Portsmouth DY 7-12-1709 as HMS Fowley. Renamed Queenborough 5-11-1744. Sold 8-17-1746.

        Sheerness. Longboat/towing vessel.
          Built Sheerness 1724.

Sheerness. 6th rate. 24 guns.
Built by Buxton, Rotherhithe, launched 8-10-1743. Sold 26-7-1768.

Queenborough. 6th rate. 24 guns.
Built by Sparrow, Rotherhithe, launched 21-1-1747. Foundered 1-1-1761 in a cyclone off Pondicherry.

        Sheerness. Waterboat/dockyard hoy.
          Purchased -10-1747. (Ex Duke of Cumberland.)

        Sheerness. Storelighter.
          Built by Dennett Faversham 1759. Broken up 1811.

Sheerness. 5th rate. 44 guns,
Built by Adams, Bucklers Hard, launched 16-7-1787. Wrecked 7-1-1805 near Trincomalee.

    Sheerness. Tender. 4x3 pdr guns.
     Built by Wilson of Sandgate. Purchased on stocks 6-8-1788. Broken up -5-1811.

    Sheerness. Tender. 10 guns.
     Purchased 1797 (91?) Sold 1810?

    Queenborough. Cutter. 12 guns.
     Listed 1800-06.

    Sheerness. Cutter. 8x4 pdr guns.
     Hired 1800-01.

    Sheerness. Cutter. 10 guns.
     Hired 1802-03.

        Sheppey. Lighter.
          Launched Portsmouth DY 7-7-1856 as MV.1.

    Sheerness. Wood paddle tug.
     Purchased 16-6-1863. Sold 3-4-1906.

        Sheerness. Dockyard craft.
          In service 1865-74. (Also known as Woolwich YC-5).

    Sheerness. Motor fishing vessel.
     Hired as balloon barrage vessel tender 6, 1940-45.

Queenborough. 'Q' class destroyer.
Built Swan Hunter, launched 16-1-1942.
To Australian Navy -10-1945. HMAS Queenborough.
Broken up 1975. Pity.

    Sheppey. Naval trawler.
     Built by Cook, Welton & Gemmill (Beverley) Holmes. Launched 1-4-1942, ex Raasay. Scrapped 1959.

    Sheppey. Controlled minelayer.
     Built by Cook, Welton &Gemmill (Beverley) Holmes. Launched 20-2-1943, renamed Blackbird.





 

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