News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: My very first car ajemp  (Read 7036 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ajemp

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 215
  • Appreciation 15
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2015, 12:28:49 »
 

one of my many cars was a vauxhall wyvern  4cyl petrol guzzler , bench seats ,column gear change, I always wanted a cresta but no luck, talking about rust,i bought a ford consul 375 convertable piller box red, I was very proud of this car  until one day  I pressed the button to put down the top and instead of the top going down the rear floor  section went down into the road .............the hydraulic ram  under the rear  seat  had rusted away    it cost me 20 quid to get it welded back into place. and that was a lot  of cash in  those days  it served me well for   another year .  reg no was 700 BGU .LOVED IT!!
                                         AJEMP

Offline Mickleburgh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 147
  • Appreciation 9
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2015, 11:30:34 »
Rust in cars is a fact of life, but does anyone remember the first Vauxhall `Victor` model? Great styling but a capacity for rusting that dogged Vauxhall for years even though they sorted themselves out pretty quickly on subsequent models. About the only make that did not have inherent rust problems was Morris but having said that I did once see a very early `Minor` that had, effectively, snapped in half and someone had welded part of an old bedstead underneath to hold it together, complete with part of a spring!!!

To answer Ajemp, yes the Bradford van was made by Jowett but had a much more troublesome engine than the `Javelin`. Some people managed to graft alternative engines, such as Austin 7, into what were quite new but cheaply bought models.

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2015, 08:15:59 »
:Rusted front wings"! I remember coming out of Blazes (?) night club in Strood one night with a mate in one of those Vauxhall Crestas with the little fins on the back.
It was a bit frosty and we went round the roundabout at Star Hill and left the front nearside wing hanging off the railings. When we checked later (didn't stop in case the cops came past) it must have been held on by the paint only. Terrible cars for rust in those days.
AlanH.

Offline davpott

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
  • Appreciation 46
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2015, 20:46:02 »
Grey moggy 1000. WKC 50.   I changed the rusted front wings with pale blue ones I had bought from a scrap yard.
Typical BMC heater insofar as it worked when you didn't need it and next to useless when you did need it.
It was quite a powerful little car that was fun to drive. Just a shame the drum brakes faded when subject to scrubbing off speed driving down country lanes between pubs. The plus side was it taught me to rely more on technique than on the brakes when cornering at speed.

Offline Bilgerat

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1028
  • Appreciation 238
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2015, 20:15:38 »
My first set of wheels was a white Datsun 120A-F11 with a black vinyl roof. Nippy and economical, it was a little 2+2 coupe. Can't remember the exact registration but I know it ended in 'R'. My favourite was a Mitsubishi Pajero LWB. Built like a tank and with fuel consumption to match, it could (and did) go anywhere. Current wheels are a 1993 Audi Cabriolet 2.0l. It might not win any races but it's a superb drive, especially with the roof off on a hot day and corners like it's on rails. Oh, and a 1973 Triumph Spitfire MK IV. That car shook, rattled but didn't roll, the roof leaked and was an advert for everything which was wrong with the British car industry in the 1970's. What it did have was bags of character and was a total hoot to drive. She succumbed to the dreaded tin-worm and was shuffled off to a man who promised he was going to restore her, but the fact that he owns a scrap yard was, I fear, no coincidence.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Rochester-bred

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 611
  • Appreciation 42
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2015, 11:38:04 »
My car was a white ford cortina mark1 FPN302C the number plate ,it cost me £30 and sat in my garden for 2 years till I sold it but I loved sitting at the driving wheel and pretending at 17 years old that I was out on the roads ,I never got as far as a driving test but I still have my provisional and its up to date although iv never driven .  :)
***I am still the child within***

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2015, 08:19:53 »
This thread brings back some shocking memories of horrid cars driven as a youngster. First car a Ford Consul Mk11 not the one with disc brakes on the front. That was designated a Consul  375 or something.
I bought that "on the knock" from a yard just as you drove into Gravesend and I swear the salesman was Arthur Daley...... :) Anyway, driving home from the car yard with Mum in the back I turned right somewhere in Strood and the left hand rear door flew open and the old girl nearly ended up in the road!
I well remember crash gearboxes as I took a PSV test in an M&D bus from Gillingham depot (a Bristol I think) and you had to double declutch up and down on the old girl.
Except at the bottom of Chatham Hill going up. The examiner (Bill Blackburn?) stopped me at the bus stop bottom of the hill just before Luton Arches  and said "Right lad, you take off from here  in first then straight back into second, don't try to double clutch as you'll just stop". Bang crash it went but it worked.
Further up he stopped me again. "Now lad, I'm going to get out and put a matchbox under the rear wheel (don't know if he actually did) and if you crush it on take off, you've failed". :-((
So into first with the bus straining against the hand brake and off I went (handbrake was about 3' long) and when he got back in he said "Well done lad, you've given me a few frights but I think you'll be OK ...eventually".
Dry old stick he was but knew his stuff with driving.
Now I drive 2010 Land Rover Defender, not much difference actually. :)
AlanH.

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2015, 22:07:55 »
HI Peterchall,   yes if you wanted first gear you stopped, or you double de clutched, some drivers found this hard to do, practice makes perfect         
Stopping to engage first wasn't proper driving! What about the  lorry and bus drivers who didn't have synchromesh on any gear?

Who has heard the expression "It's OK, the next one's a rubber one" said as sarcastic reassurance to a driver who crashed the gears - implying that the next gear ratio wouldn't make a noise when it was selected because the gears were made of rubber
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1932
  • Appreciation 165
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2015, 22:00:11 »
First car was a Citroen 2CV Dyane (the powerful version!!). It was 20 years old when I had it. Current car is a BMW 740i (yes it is the big one with the 4lt V8) also 20 years old.... My cars seem to get better but not younger........................

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Ajemp

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 215
  • Appreciation 15
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2015, 21:46:12 »


    HI Peterchall,   yes if you wanted first gear you stopped, or you double de clutched, some drivers found this hard to do,pratice makes perfect                   
          your reg number today would be worth many thousands of pounds ..............         

Offline Ajemp

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 215
  • Appreciation 15
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2015, 21:04:12 »

 
 Hi mickleburg, did the company Jowett make a commercial vehicle called Bradford?
                                                                                                                                         ajemp.

Offline filmer01

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 159
  • Appreciation 9
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2015, 17:54:37 »
In 1968 my first car was a 1937 Austin Seven Ruby, rebodied in the 50s as a Special with a red wood and alloy body that looked like an MG TC (if the light was poor and you squinted a lot). Cost £10, I had passed my test 6weeks after my 17th birthday and I very proudly drove it to school. Pram hood roof flapped about and the side screens just meant you could not see, you still got very, very wet. Only one small door on the driver's side caused much amusement with a simple, single bench seat and the miniskirt clad young ladies of the day :)

It did 55, both mph flat out and mpg as with 747cc and no great weight (or power) economy was assured.

One of those large packing cases that people used when returning from overseas postings came with it, full of spares - 2 gearboxes, most of an engine, a dynamo etc. Tried the gearboxes, but one had very odd ratios and the other even less syncromesh than the original, which went back in. I still automatically double declutch into first as a legacy of that car and a string of sixties bangers also with crash first gear.

The "spit and hope" crank lubrication failed me on a dark night as I pulled off the A2/A249 traffic lights at Key Street to go up Keycol Hill. The oil pressure suddenly rose and before I could react there was a loud knocking noise then BANG! and it stopped. I walked the remaining 3miles home and got my sister to tow me home the next day. Foolishly I told her to keep the rope taut, so she kept her foot down in her Mini all the way down the other side of the hill (Boyces Hill) - it never went as fast before or since. I could not slow her as the brakes were virtually non-existent - it taken three goes to pass the Mot brake test as the cross shaft (mechanical brakes no fancy hydraulics here) used to twist when effort was applied and upset the balance.

Heaving the spanners about later, even at that early stage in my mechanical journey I realised that there should not be 3 pistons at top-dead-centre and a big end bolt had let go, the conrod had bashed a hole in the alloy crankcase. The crankcase was bashed back into shape, and body filler used to plug the damage, then a coat of aluminium paint - good as new. I rebuilt the rest of the engine with many modifications from the 750 motor club tuning manual, got it going and quickly sold it for £25, plus £10 for the extra spares.

Used the money to buy a 1957 Morris Minor with the luxury of a roof, heater and wipers that wiped more than a handkerchief sized bit in front of the driver, as well as 12volt electrics so the lights gave you a bit of a chance. Oh and the floor was not wood boards that meant puddles could splash through the floor - see comment about female companions above - the screams when cold water shot up their hosiery were quite alarming.... Wish I still had it though - I still have one of the big end bolts, the thread is very badly necked (distorted by overtightening so that a section becomes thinner) so no wonder it blew up.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline Mickleburgh

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 147
  • Appreciation 9
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2015, 16:30:45 »
My first car was a pre-war Austin with a `Shooting Brake` body like the Morris Minor Traveller. It had a `cherished` low number Cornwall registration mark that would sell for hundreds today. Best remembered was my next buy. a Jowett `Javelin` with a `flat-four` engine that had a remarkably good turning circle. Found out why shortly after I got it: coming down the hill into Bridge there was a line of stopped traffic and the brakes failed! The stops were missing and the edge of the tyre had been rubbing on the brake pipe. Managed to go past about a dozen cars, make a sharp right turn and bring it to a stop before oncoming traffic came through. A narrow squeak indeed and I had my mother and several young children on board. Got it home, though, with only the handbrake and great deal of care.
The car I regret missing out on would have been a real girl magnet: a Nash `Metropolitan` soft top coupe, left hand drive, American styling, spare wheel under canvas on the back, but essentially an Austin A30. The garage where I worked specialised in `bangers` from the mart which were done up for sale. This sad specimen must have been an export escapee as the model was not marketed in the UK until 1957. The hood was disintegrated, there was a scuff to the fibreglass wing and the engine would probably need new piston rings. Made up my mind to have it, hopefully at cost if I did much of the work myself; re-spray  yellow with black relief, perhaps. But we also had a Singer sports car in the yard (a poor mans alternative to the MG) and a customer lighted on that and wanted it done up for him at any cost. All our attention was switched to that and the poor old `Metropolitan` shunted to the back of the yard, never to be done up.
The thing about the cars of our youth was that at least you could tinker about with them and learn mechanics as you went along. Today there is virtually nothing under the bonnet you would dare touch. I once had to consult the manual to find out where the windscreen wash bottle was located!

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2015, 15:03:38 »
My ‘first’ car belonged to somebody else – no, I didn’t nick it! One reason I went into the motor trade was that I was mad keen on cars and it seemed the only way I would ever get near them – the thought of owning one was beyond my wildest dreams.

Thus I drove a big variety of cars up to Jaguars. Then in 1954 I went into college lecturing and it was goodbye to driving. As an indicator of living standards, even as a ‘well paid’ lecturer it was 1958 before I could afford my own car. Like Ajemp’s, it was a Ford Popular, Reg No VAT69 (a brand of whiskey!) Do you recall that the 3-speed gearbox had no synchromesh on first  gear?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 946
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: My very first car ajemp
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2015, 14:40:29 »
My first car was a Ford V8 Pilot remember insuring it at TIBERS? in Rochester High St as a 17 year old learner driver for £19 probably be £1000s these days.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines