News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Sayings and their meanings.  (Read 17351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 994
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #78 on: February 13, 2016, 23:28:15 »
The phrase get my goat may have had a connection with the sport of kings :)

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/get-someone-s-goat

although this link delves a little deeper although it is of American origin

https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/getting-ones-goat-can-you-help-solve-the-mystery/
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Online davpott

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
  • Appreciation 46
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #77 on: February 13, 2016, 19:59:13 »
If somebody has an annoying or irritating habit, why do we say “It gets my goat”? Why doesn’t it get my dog or horse?

I've no idea where it comes from but I suspect it has an ancient origin as the Spanish have a very similar expression.

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #76 on: February 12, 2016, 21:49:11 »
Years ago the people who made hats, used mercury in their manufacture and this was known to cause insanity
Hence the saying "As mad as a Hatter".
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #75 on: February 03, 2016, 18:27:16 »
A rather personal quote. (With tongue in cheek ) from "You look after the pence and the pounds will look after themselves".

"You look after the pounds, us Pennies can look after ourselves ."
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 994
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #74 on: February 01, 2016, 23:54:01 »
Here`s a few guesses for raining cats and dogs, but it appears that no one really knows
.
https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006041614083
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #73 on: February 01, 2016, 20:44:03 »
I have always used your grandmother's first saying in response to somebody's complicated explanation of something.
My wife uses her second one the other way round - "I might look like a cabbage (or "be cabbage looking") but I'm not as green as you think I am".
I think your last one it means "All the things we are accused of are true, but we are not admitting it, so b***** off"

When it rains heavily, why does it rain cats and dogs? Why not cows and sheep or, more appropriately. fish and seals?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Nemo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 287
  • Appreciation 15
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #72 on: January 31, 2016, 20:59:14 »
Two sayings of my Grandmother were "we had one of those but the wheel fell off" and "you're not as green as you're cabbage-looking".  However, language is dynamic, so offers please for the meaning of "we have no-one available for comment" in the context of "...but here's a statement on the subject"!

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 470
  • Appreciation 37
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #71 on: January 31, 2016, 08:35:27 »
Conan, thank you for the leads, having researched the term His/her Majesty's trusted servant at Maidenhead library plus other on line establishments, it seems it was never in formal usage. No documented evidence has been found at the moment, the nearest I can come up with is 'His/Her Majesty's loyal and trusted servant ' used in some early Victorian warrants, so all in all it may be best to disregard my publication of 28/01/16, sorry for any problems caused, not intended to confuse the issue.😷


Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #69 on: January 29, 2016, 10:50:34 »
Signals99, that is an interesting note, I  will search through my records and see what I can find.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 470
  • Appreciation 37
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #68 on: January 28, 2016, 21:36:11 »
Hi CDP, how far back did Mr Shardlow's manuscripts go? Some Victorian documents use the term Her MAJTS as an abbreviation of Her Majesty's Trusted Servant when referring to senior civilian employees, used in the context of' established personnel in later years. I think it applies to master shipwrights. Foreman of the yard etc.and personnel of that grade, then again, I may well be wrong, can anyone help out with this?

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 828
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #67 on: January 28, 2016, 20:40:01 »
The older workers In Sheerness Yard would say that rabbit is a local term as were many other words I think.
Reference the word `Matey`. My friend, Bert Shardlow, Foreman of Boilermakers in Sheerness Yard and very, very keen on Family and Local History, he gave me his original manuscripts on the History of a few Dockyards and gave  the typed, pristine copies to Greenwich Maritime Museum. On his retirement he spent a lot of time in Woolwich  Deptford, Yards, etc. doing research. He was allowed to enter and wander around all the old Dockyards.
He showed me a copy of a very old manuscript which referred to Her MAJTS workmen in the Yard (I can't  remember this exactly). The MAJTS looked like MATEY on this record. Bert was sure this was the start of the word Matey. He had seen this on many old records.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 470
  • Appreciation 37
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #66 on: January 28, 2016, 08:31:18 »
Peterchall ref your comment "rabbit job is local " during my time in the yard I was employed as a health physics monitor in the nuclear power department, as such l was often sent to other yards to work.
The term rabbit job, as far as I can recall, was not known or used in either yard.
Interestingly enough, neither was the term ' dockyard Matey'. At Devonport I think the term 'dockies' was used as a general discription of yard employees. Sorry can't tell you the term used in Rosyth yard, never could speak 'jockaneas'.😀

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #65 on: January 28, 2016, 07:24:34 »
When I worked in Sheerness Dockyard a " Rabbit " was a personal job that you would work on to take home if you could and obviously hide when the bosses were around .

When I worked in the printing trade, this was known as a `PJ` (private job).

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 470
  • Appreciation 37
Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #64 on: January 27, 2016, 23:35:16 »
Conan , thanks for the post ref 'scran' , it's obvious the word goes back a long long way .  My interpretation was , by and large, taken from a booklet about Kentish social history .There never was an intention to offer the idea as definitive. This is the beauty of the forum one post creates another and in the end we often reach the answer to the question, long may it be so.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines